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Courtship & marriage

Maid of sweet Gurteen

(28) Maid of sweet Gurteen

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            MAID

            CF SWEET

           Gurteen.

Printed by W. M'Call, 4 Cartwright Place, Byrom Street,
      Liverpool.—Shops and Hawkers supplied.

Come all you gentle musen, combine and lend an ear,
While I set forth the praises of a charming maiden fair ;
It's the curls of her yellow rocks that stole away my heart,
And death I'm sure, will be the sure, if she and I must part.

The praises of this lovely maid I mean for to unfold,
Her hair hung o'er her shoulders abroad like links of gold.
Her carriage neat, her limbs complete, which agitates my brain,
And her skin is whiter than the swan, upon the purling stream.

My father he contrived a plan, hat filled my heart with woe ;
He looked her in a close room, and would not let her go ;
At her windows I have waited thinking she might be seen,
In hopes to get another sight of            of sweet Gurteen

My father he arose one day                      did say,
Oh ! son ! dear son ! be ad                        t throw yourself away ;
To marry a poor servant w                    ey are so mean;
So, stay at home, and do no                  ong with me remain,

O ! father ! dearest father ! don't part me from my dears
I would not leave my darling girl, for a thousand pounds a year ;
Where I possess'd of England's crown, she should be my Queen ;
In high renown, I'd wear a crown, for the maid of sweet Gurteen

My father in a passion flew, and nnto me did say,
Since it is the case, within this place, no longer she will stay ;
ark what I say, this very day, you ne'er will see her face,
For I will send her far away, into some lonely place.

'Twas in a few days after, a horse he did prepare,
And sent my darling far away, to a place I know not where,
I may go view my darling's room, where oftimes she has been,
But, here in pain, I still remain, for the maid of sweet Gurteen.

How to conclude and make so end, I take my pen in hand,
J O'Brian is my name, and flowery is my land ;
My days is spent in mo ment, since my darling I first seen,
has is th shed, as a place call'd sweet Garteen.

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         ANSWER

                  TO

               BETSY

                  OF

BALLINTOWN BRAE.

Young men and maidens I pray lend an ear,
To hear the sad fate of two lovers so dear ;
Charming young Betsy of Ballintown Brae,
And the Lord of the Moorland, who led her astrong.

One night as this young man lay down for to sleep
Young Betsy came to him, and o'er him did weep
Saying, you are the young man that caused me to
roam,
Far, far from my friends, and my own native home

My once blushing cheek, alas ! moulders away,
Beneath the cold tomb, in sweet Ballintown Brae.
He awoke from his slumber, like one in surprise,
Yes ! yes ! it's the voice of young Betsy ! he cries ;
And if she be dead, as the vision now say,
I'll lie by her side in sweet Ballintown Brae.
He call'd for his servant to saddle his steed,
Over hills and high mountains he rede with great
speed,

Until he arriv'd, in the noon time of day,
At the cot of young Betsy, in Ballintown Brae.
Betsy's old father stood at his own gate,
Like a man, quite forlorn, bewailing his fate,

The young lord advanced to afford him relief,
And begg'd he would tell him the cause of his grief
I had but one daughter, the old man did say,
And now she ties low in sweet Ballintown Brae.

Her skin was as fair as the lily or swan ;
As bonny a lass as the sun e'er shone on ;
Her heart was broke—she died in dispair ;
She sometimes went frantic, and tearing her h i

And all by a young man that led her astray,
And left her far from sweet Ballintown Brae.
Yes ! I am the traitor ! the young man replied;
I certainly would I could make her my bride ;

It's then from a scabbard a small sword he drew,
With a heart unrelenting, he pierc'd his
through ;
And when he was dying, these words he did say,
Leave me down with young Betsy in Ballintown
Brae.

All things being ready, the grave it was dug,
And with bonny Betsy, the young lord was la
So all you young maidens from your cot do
stray,
But think of young Batsy from Ballintown Brae.
                                                            53.

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