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Courtship & marriage

' Courtship & marriage ' contains the following 383 items:

Thumbnail for 'To a young gentleman in love'

To a young gentleman in love [ID: 86525074]

" ... A tale". First line reads: From publick noise and factious strife. Anonymous. By Matthew Prior. In one column. This is a variant with 'A' printed bottom right of the first page instead of the catchword 'Contempt'.

Author: Prior, Matthew, 1664-1721

Date printed: 1702

Thumbnail for 'Young woman's A B C'

(1) Young woman's A B C [ID: 74891140]

Three ballads. Young woman's A B C - first line reads: A stands for Annie, she's a pretty girl I know. Flora Bell - first line reads: In Maryland I had a farm. Mother kiss'd me in my dream - first line reads: Lying on my dying bed, through the dark and silent night. In two columns with a woodcut above each. An attempt has been made to obliterate the imprint.

Printer: White, John, printer in Liverpool

Date printed: 1860

Thumbnail for 'Henry's cottage maid'

(2) Henry's cottage maid [ID: 74891185]

First line reads: Ah! where can fly my soul's true-/love. In one column with a woodcut above the title. Anonymous: By Ignaz Pleyel.

Author: Pleyel, Ignaz, 1757-1831

Date printed: 1820

Thumbnail for 'New royal fortuneteller'

(3) New royal fortuneteller [ID: 74891314]

" ... Being a warning to old and young, rich and poor, married and single, but particularly to young men and women, who by perusing this may be suited with good husbands and wives". First line reads: All you who wish your fortunes for to know. In two columns with a coat of arms between 'new' and 'royal' in the title.

Printer: Walker, George, printer at North Shields

Probable date printed: 1834-1888

Thumbnail for 'Single life-for me'

(4) Single life-for me [ID: 74891317]

First line reads: All you young men of high renown. In one column with a printer's ornament above the title.

Printer: Pitts, John, 1765-1844

Probable date printed: 1820-1844

Thumbnail for 'New song called the stock & wall'

(5) New song called the stock & wall [ID: 74891437]

A new song called the stock & wall - first line reads: As a noble lady walked down a narrow lane. Low back'd car - first line reads: When first I saw sweet Peggy. Low back'd car - Anonymous: By Samuel Lover.

Date printed: 1870

Thumbnail for 'Sailor and his truelove'

(6) Sailor and his truelove [ID: 74891440]

First line reads: As a young sailor and his truelove one/ morning in May. In one column with a woodcut above the title.

Printer: Jennings, J., printer in Fleet Street, London

Probable date printed: 1802-1809

Thumbnail for 'Mary of the dale'

(7) Mary of the dale [ID: 74891452]

Three ballads. Mary of the dale - first line reads: As blythe I tripp'd the other morn. The pilot - first line reads: When lightnings pierce the pitchy sky. Jack and I saw them no more - first line reads: Jack and I were both messmates a long time at sea.

Printer: Walker, George, 1758-1835

Date printed: 1830

Thumbnail for 'Lass of ----town'

(8) Lass of ----town [ID: 74891455]

Two ballads. The lass of ----town - first line reads: As down by --- Barracks. The frolicsome widow - first line reads: I'll sing of a widow I know her quite well.

Printer: Harkness, John, b. 1814

Probable date printed: 1840-1866

Thumbnail for 'Old oak tree'

(9) Old oak tree [ID: 74891503]

Two ballads. The old oak tree - first line reads: As I walked out one May morning. The old house at home - first line reads: Oh! the old house at home. In two columns with an illustration above each.

Printer: Walker, George, printer at North Shields

Probable date printed: 1834-1888

Thumbnail for 'Seventeen come Sunday'

(10) Seventeen come Sunday [ID: 74891506]

Seventeen come Sunday - first line reads: As I walked out one May morning. The impatient lassie - first line reads: Deuce tek the clock! click-clackin sae.

Printer: Walker, George, printer at North Shields

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Banks of sweet primroses'

(11) Banks of sweet primroses [ID: 74891509]

Two ballads. The banks of sweet primroses - first line reads: As I walked out one Mid-summer's Morning. The collier lass - first line reads: My name is Polly Parker, I'm come o'er from Worsley.

Printer: Walker, George, printer at North Shields

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'New song call'd Gassco [sic] green'

(12) New song call'd Gassco [sic] green [ID: 74891530]

First line reads: As I walk'd out one morning fair. In one column with two woodcuts above the title.

Printer: Brereton, P., printer in Dublin

Date printed: 1870

Thumbnail for 'Bonny blue handkerchief'

(13) Bonny blue handkerchief [ID: 74891551]

Two ballads. The bonny blue handkerchief - first line reads: As I was a walking one morning in May. The jolly rover - first line reads: Here I come, but seldom seen.

Printer: Walker, George, printer at North Shields

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Lark in the morning'

(14) Lark in the morning [ID: 74891554]

Lark in the morning - first line reads: As I was walkiug [sic] one morning in May. Fanny Gray - first line reads: Well, well, sir! so you've come at last, I thought you'd come/ no more.

Printer: Bebbington, John Oliver

Probable date printed: 1855-1858

Thumbnail for 'I shall be married on Monday morning'

(15) I shall be married on Monday morning [ID: 74891557]

I shall be married on Monday morning - first line reads: As I was walking one morning in spring. The pope he leads a happy life - first line reads: The Pope he leads a happy life.

Printer: Williamson, printer in Newcastle

Date printed: 1845

Thumbnail for 'Fiddle'

(16) Fiddle [ID: 74891578]

First line reads: As Jockey on a summer's day. In one column.

Printer: Jackson and Son, printers in Birmingham

Probable date printed: 1843-1847

Thumbnail for 'Please your wife'

(17) Please your wife [ID: 74891581]

Two ballads. Please your wife - first line reads: As married men are seedy proud, if they/ have got a wife. Making love by moonlight - first line reads: Various folks have various ways of/ making love, we know. Making love by moonlight: Written by Thomas Dodsworth. Sung by Edward Hillier, and George Vokes. At foot of second column: Music to the above song can be had for 7 stamps, to T. Dodsworth, 4, Florence Square, Florence-st., Holloway Head, Birmingham.

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Judy Connor'

(18) Judy Connor [ID: 74891626]

Two ballads. Judy Connor - first line reads: At eighteen year's old I fell ill. Remember the Duke of Argyle - first line reads: Jockey he lo'ed Annie. Judy Connor - Tune: The coronation - (Beuler). Remember the Duke of Argyle - first line reads: Jockey he lo'ed Annie.

Printer: Walker, George, printer at North Shields

Probable date printed: 1834-1888

Thumbnail for 'Something'

(19) Something [ID: 74891680]

" ... a parody on nothing". Something - first line reads: Attend to my song and of something I'll sing. William and Dinah - first line reads: It's of a liquor merchant in london did dwell.

Printer: Pitts, John, 1765-1844

Probable date printed: 1820-1844

Thumbnail for 'Smuggler's bride'

(20) Smuggler's bride [ID: 74891713]

The smuggler's bride - first line reads: Attention give and a tale I'll tell. Dash my vig - first line reads: Adoo and farewell to this wile smoky town. In two columns with an illustration above the second.

Printer: Walker, George, 1758-1835

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'New song called Dianna Kitty Anni Maria'

(21) New song called Dianna Kitty Anni Maria [ID: 74891746]

First line reads: Been in the blooming spring wher [sic] the small birds sing. In one column with a woodcut above the title.

Printer: Brereton, P., printer in Dublin

Date printed: 1870

Thumbnail for 'Rose of Albion'

(22) Rose of Albion [ID: 74891785]

The rose of Albion - first line reads: Blow softly, ye breezes, and waft over/ the billows. God save the Queen - first line reads: God save queen Caroline. In two columns with a woodcut above each.

Printer: J. & C. Evans

Date printed: 1820

Thumbnail for 'Betty of Billingsgate'

(23) Betty of Billingsgate [ID: 74891788]

First line reads: A boat unmoor'd from off Bank-/side. In one column with a woodcut above the title.

Printer: Jennings, J., printer in Fleet Street, London

Probable date printed: 1802-1809

Thumbnail for 'She wore a white rose in her hair'

(24) She wore a white rose in her hair [ID: 74891881]

She wore a white rose in her hair - first line reads: By moonlight we met and whispered fond vows. The blind boy's song - first line reads: I am but a poor blind boy.

Date printed: 1870

Thumbnail for 'Happy couple'

(25) Happy couple [ID: 74892070]

The happy couple - first line reads: Come all you brisk young damsels that sport in Cupid's chain. Old Mr. December - first line reads: Old Mr. December he lost his wife.

Printer: Walker, George, 1758-1835

Date printed: 1830

Thumbnail for 'Wonderful shape'

(26) Wonderful shape [ID: 74892118]

Two ballads. The wonderful shape - first line reads: Come all you free jokers give ear to my song. Edwin and Flora - first line reads: Good morning lovely Flora.

Date printed: 1845

Thumbnail for 'Devil among the ladies or the women turned boxers, for the sake of the handsome coachman'

(27) Devil among the ladies or the women turned boxers, for the sake of the handsome coachman [ID: 74892163]

" ... together with an excellent new song". First line of text reads: The following is an Account of a/ droll affair which took place a few/ days ago. First line of verse reads: Come all you gallant ladies gay. In prose and verse.

Printer: Disley, Henry, fl. 1850-1878

Date printed: 1815

Thumbnail for 'Maid of sweet Gurteen'

(28) Maid of sweet Gurteen [ID: 74892175]

Maid of sweet Gurteen - first line reads: Come all you gentle muses, combine and lend an ear. Answer to Betsy of Ballintown Brae - first line reads: Young men and maidens I pray lend an ear.

Printer: William M'Call (Firm)

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Is your rhubarb up'

(29) Is your rhubarb up [ID: 74892223]

First line reads: Come all you lads and lasses and listeu [sic] for a while. In two columns.

Date printed: 1845

Thumbnail for 'Young woman's wants'

(30) Young woman's wants [ID: 74892301]

Two ballads.Young woman's wants - first line reads: Come all you single fellows, if you want to change your life. Doings on a Sunday night - first line reads: I'm going to sing a funny song. In two columns.

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Young woman's wants'

(31) Young woman's wants [ID: 74892304]

Two ballads. Young woman's wants - first line reads: Come all you single fellows who wish to change your life. Reading made easy - first line reads: Ye Lads of this Nation, of high and low station. In two columns.

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Undaunted female'

(32) Undaunted female [ID: 74892331]

The undaunted female - first line reads: Come all you true lovers and a story I'll un-/fold. A neew [sic] song called The black horse - first line reads: Come all you young bachelors take warning/ by me.

Date printed: 1860

Thumbnail for 'Admred [sic] song called Young Molly Bawn'

(33) Admred [sic] song called Young Molly Bawn [ID: 74892346]

Young Molly Bawn - first line reads: Come all you young fellows that follow the gun. Rocking the cradle - first line reads: As I roved out on a fine summer's/ morning.

Date printed: 1860

Thumbnail for 'Boys of Ballanmore'

(34) Boys of Ballanmore [ID: 74892352]

Two ballads. The boys of Ballanmore - first line reads: Come all you young Irishmen, that are inclined to roam. The knickerbocker line - first line reads: My love she is tailoress, a tailores [sic] by trade.

Printer: Pearson, T., printer in Manchester, fl. 1870-1871

Date printed: 1860

Thumbnail for 'Single life for me'

(35) Single life for me [ID: 74892355]

Two ballads. A single life for me - first line reads: Come all young men of high renown. Fare-thee-well - first line reads: Fare-thee-well! and if for ever.

Printer: Walker, George, printer at North Shields

Date printed: 1830

Thumbnail for 'Comforts of marriage'

(36) Comforts of marriage [ID: 74892361]

First line reads: Come all young men that are, married. In one column.

Printer: Birt, Thomas, fl. 1824-1841

Probable date printed: 1833-1851

Thumbnail for 'Constant pair; or, the pretty prentice boy'

(37) Constant pair; or, the pretty prentice boy [ID: 74892364]

Two ballads.The constant pair - first line reads: Come all you pretty maidens, and a story I'll tell. The workhouse boy - first line reads: The cloth was laid in the Vorkhouse hall.

Printer: Walker, George, printer at North Shields

Date printed: 1830

Thumbnail for 'Crocodile'

(38) Crocodile [ID: 74892460]

Two ballads. The crocodile - first line reads: Come list, ye landsmen, unto me. My gentle Colleen Bawn - first line reads: For sixteen months I courted her. In two columns with an illustration above each.

Date printed: 1860

Thumbnail for 'Tailor and the treacle cask'

(39) Tailor and the treacle cask [ID: 74892466]

Two ballads. The tailor and the treacle cask - first line reads: Come listen awhile and a story I'll tell. Margaret Scott's epitaph - first line reads: Stop passenger until my life you read.

Printer: Harkness, John, b. 1814

Probable date printed: 1840-1866

Thumbnail for 'Silly old man'

(40) Silly old man [ID: 74892469]

Two ballads. The silly old man - first line reads: Come listen awhile and I'll sing you a song. The constant lovers - first line reads: A sailor courted a farmer's daughter.

Printer: Pitts, John, 1765-1844

Probable date printed: 1820-1844

Thumbnail for 'Fun upon fun or, The butcher in his glory at the sale of the beauty of Bethnal-Green'

(41) Fun upon fun or, The butcher in his glory at the sale of the beauty of Bethnal-Green [ID: 74892496]

" ... in Smithfield market, on Friday last, giving an account how she was sold to a baker for twenty guineas". In prose and verse. First line of text reads: Another disgraceful transaction took place in/ Smithfield-market on Friday last. First line of verse reads: Come listen ye lovers of fun to this song.

Printer: Catnach, John, 1769-1813

Date printed: 1815

Thumbnail for 'Woman, is the pride of the land'

(42) Woman, is the pride of the land [ID: 74892505]

Three ballads. Woman, is the pride of the land - first line reads: Come, married and single, together pray mingle. Her mouth with a smile - first line reads: Her mouth with a smile. I heard thy fate without a tear.

Printer: Walker, George, printer at North Shields

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'John and his wife on using tea'

(43) John and his wife on using tea [ID: 74892523]

Two ballads. John and his wife on using tea - first line reads: Come neighbours near, and I'll tell you a tale. Oh, no! We never mention her - first line reads: Oh, no! we never mention her.

Printer: Walker, George, printer at North Shields

Date printed: 1830

Thumbnail for 'Second thoughts are best'

(44) Second thoughts are best [ID: 74892562]

Two ballads. Second thoughts are best - first line reads: Come write me down ye powers above. Oh, no! We never mention her - first line reads: Oh, no! we never mention her, her name is never heard.

Printer: Birt, Thomas, fl. 1824-1841

Date printed: 1828

Thumbnail for 'Hint to husbands and wives'

(45) Hint to husbands and wives [ID: 74892571]

" ... or an entertaining dialogue between a man and his wife in this neighhourhood [sic], concerning house-keeping, with an entire new song". First line reads: Come you married men and women too, of every degree. In prose and verse. In two columns with an illustration above the title.

Printer: Walker, George, printer at North Shields

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Barber of Seville'

(46) Barber of Seville [ID: 74892577]

First line reads: A Comely young lad liv'd, a few years ago. In two columns with an illustration above the title. Imprint from top of sheet. Printed beneath the title: '(Extracted from the Monthly mirror - New series, No. XIV.) "I could a tail unfold." by P. G.'.

Printer: Robert Laurie and James Whittle

Date printed: 1808

Thumbnail for 'Amrock [sic] green'

(47) Amrock [sic] green [ID: 74892580]

The shamrock green - first line reads: A constant girl was heard to cry. Blow th candle out - first line reads: It's of a young 'prentice boy who went to court his dear.

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Rose, shamrock, & thistle'

(48) Rose, shamrock, & thistle [ID: 74892589]

Three ballads. Peter and Peggy - first line reads: A couple from the emerald isle, once lived in Manchester awhile. Drunkard's friend - first line reads: To work on Monday I think its not right. Rose, shamrock, & thistle - first line reads: The land of Erin is the land of delight.

Printer: Bebbington, John Oliver

Probable date printed: 1858-1861

Thumbnail for 'Helen the fair'

(49) Helen the fair [ID: 74892688]

First line reads: Fair Helen one morn from her cottage had/ stray'd. In one column with a woodcut above the title.

Printer: Birt, Thomas, fl. 1824-1841

Date printed: 1828