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(82) next ››› Page 68Page 68Duty and part of reason

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THE GENTLE SHEPHERD. <>7
Maufe. Then let us gae ; for fee, 'tis hard on night;,
"Xht wedlin clouds ihiae wi' red letting lijjlit.
{Exeunt.
SCENE ir.
IVJien birds begin to nod upon the bough,
/ind the green fivaird grows damp ivi' falling «?ew.
While good Sir William is to reji retired.
The Gentle Shepherd, tenderly infpir\i,
I'Valks thro' the bronm ivi'' Roger ever leel.
To tiicet, to comfart Meg, and takfareiuiel.
Patie and Roger.
Roger.
WOW ! but I'm cadgie, and my heart lawps I'.gLt:
O, Mr. Patrick, ay your thoughts were right;
Sure gentle fonks are farer feen than we.
That naething ha'e to brag of jiedigree.
My Jenny now, wha hrak my heart this morn.
Is perfeft yielding— I'weet— and nae mair fcorn:
I fpak my mind— ihe heard— I fpak again—
She fmil'd— I kifs'd— I woo'd, nor woo'd in vain.
Patie. I'm glad to hear't— But O ! my change this
day
Heaves up my joy, and yet I'm fometimes wy.
I've found a father, gently kind ns brave.
And an eftate that lifts me 'boon the lave.
Wi' looks a' kindnefs, words that love confeft, "!
He a' the father to my foul exnreft, ?.
While clofe he held me to his manly brealt. J
Such M'ere the eyes, he faid, thus fmil'd the mouth
Oitfay lov'd mother, blefFing of my youth 1
E 2

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