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THE GENTLE SHEPHERD. 37
Cou'd ye turn Patie's love to Neps, and then
Peggy's to me,— I'd be the hapl'ieft man.
MoAife. I'll try my arc to gar the bowls row right,
Sae ^aiig your ways and come again at night ;
'Gninft that thne I'll foiiie fimple things prepare.
Worth a* your peale and groats, tak ye nae care.
Bail. Wiel, Maufe, I'll come, gif I the road can find;
But if ye raiie the deil, he'll raife the wind;
Syne, rain, and thunder, may be, when 'tis late.
Will ina'c the night lae mirk, I'll tine the gate.
We're a' to rant in Symmie's at a fead,
O will ye come like badrans for a jeit ;
And there ye can cur different 'haviours fpy ;
There's nane fhall ken o't there liut you and I.
Maufe. ' Tis like I may— but let na on what's paft
'Tween you and me, elfe fear a kittle call.
Bail. If I aught of your fecrets e'er advance.
May ye ride on rae ilka night to France.
(Exit Baiildy.
Maufe her lane.
Hard luck, alake ; when poverty and eild.
Weeds out of falhicn, and a lanely bield,
Wi' a fma' caft of wiles, fhould in a twitch,
Gi' ane the hatefu' name, A ivrinlded ivitcli.
This fool imagines, as do mony fie.
That I'm a wretch in compafl wi' Auld Nic,
Becaufe by education I was taught
To fpeakand a6l aboon their common thought:
Their grofs miftake Ihall quickly now appear; (here'
Soon fliall they ken what brought, what keeps me
^Nane kens but me ; and if the morn were come,
I'll tell them tales will gar them a' fuig dumb.
C 3 (ExH,

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