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(221) Page 195 - Lawland lads think they are fine

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THE SONGS OF SCOTLAND.
195
THE LAWLAND LADS THINK THEY AKE FINE.
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Law - land lads think they are fine, But O, they're vain and
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id - ly gau - dy ; How much un - like the grace - fu' mein And man - ly looks of my
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High - land lad - die !
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O my hon - nie High -land lad - die, My hand • some, charm -ing
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High-land laddie ! May heaven still guard, and love re-ward, Our Law-land lass and her High-land lad-die !
If I were free at will to choose
To be the wealthiest Lawland lady,
I'd tak' young Donald without trews,
With bonnet blue, and belted plaidie.
my bonnie, &c.
The brawest 1 beau in burrows town,
In a' his airs, wi' art made ready,
Compared to him, he's but a clown,
He's finer far in tartan plaidie.
my bonnie, &c.
O'er benty 2 hill wi' him I'll run,
And leave my Lawland kin and daddie ;
Frae winter's cauld and summer's sun,
He'll screen me wi' his Highland plaidie.
my bonnie, &c.
Few compliments between us pass ;
I ca' him my dear Highland laddie,
And he ca's me his Lawland lass,
Syne a rows me in beneath his plaidie.
my bonnie, &c.
Nae greater joy I'll e'er pretend,
Than that his love prove true and steady,
Like mine to him, which ne'er shall end,
While heaven preserves my Highland laddie.
my bonnie, &c.
1 Gayest.
: A hill covered with coarse grass.
B Afterwards.
" The Lawland Lads think they are pine." This melody, called " The New Highland Laddie," was composed by
the celebrated English composer, Mich. Arne, to an English version of Ramsay's Highland Lassie. The words and
music appeared in the Ifuses' Delight, p. 66, Liverpool, 1754. The " Old Highland Laddie" is quite a different air,
which consisted originally of one strain, and was so published, with Ramsay's verses, in the Orpheus Caledonius in
1725. It is supposed to be very old, as it appears (according to Mr. Stenhouse) in a MS. collection of airs in 1687.
We subjoin it. We omit the fifth stanza of Ramsay's verses, for sufficient reasons. William Napier, in his first Col-
lection, 1790, also omits that stanza.
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