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(87) Page 63 - Auld Rob Morris
THE SONGS OF SCOTLAND.
63
AULD ROB MORRIS.
^qg=£a g^^^=g ^E!^ ^p
glen, He*s the lung o' guid 2 fel - lows, and wale 3 o' auld
&
^^=^3e^S^
Jsi
men ; He has gowd* in his cof - fers, he has
ow - sen 5 and
^^^sm.
*st
2=*=±
-e-
kine, And ae bon - nie las - sie, his dar - ling and mine.
She's fresh as the morning, the fairest in May ;
She's sweet as the evening amang the new hay ;
As blythe and as artless as the lamb on the lea,
And dear to my heart as the light to the e'e.
But ! she's an heiress — auld Robin's a laird,
And my daddie 6 has nocht but a cot-house and yard ;
A wooer like me maunna' hope to come speed ;
The wounds I must hide that will soon be my dead. 8
The day comes to me, but delight brings me nane ;
The night comes to me, but my rest it is gane ;
I wander my lane like a night-troubled ghaist, 10
And I sigh as my heart it wad" burst in my breast.
had she but been of a lower degree,
1 then might ha'e hoped she wad smiled upon me;
0, how past descriving 12 had then been my bliss,
As now my distraction no words can express.
1 Dwells.
7 Must nut.
2 Good.
8 Death.
3 Choice.
9 Lone.
* Gold.
io Ghost.
6 Oxen.
" Would.
e Father.
12 Describing.
"Auld Ron Monius." This air appears in tablature in the Leyden MS. Lyra- Viol Book, mentioned in the Note
page 12 of this work It differs a little from the sets given by Johnson and others. The set adopted by the arranger
for this work is nearly the one given in Watts' Musical Miscellany, 1730. The neglect of the ordinary compass of
voices, alluded to in Note page 9, occurs again in this air. The air was published in the Orpheus Caledonius, in
1725, and in Watts' Musical Miscellany, 1730, vol. iii. p. 174, and in Craig's Select Scottish Tunes, printed in the
same year. Mr. D. Laing notices the air as occurring in Mr. Blaikie's MS., dated 1692, under the name of " Jock the
Laird's Brother." In November 1792, Burns wrote for the air the words here given. The two first lines only belong
to the old ballad given in Allan Ramsay's Tea-Table Miscellany.

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