Skip to main content

‹‹‹ prev (84) Page 60Page 60Will ye go to the ewe-bughts, Marion

(86) next ››› Page 62Page 62Soldier's return

(85) Page 61 - Duncan Gray
THE SONGS OF SCOTLAND.
61
P = 72
u, mf.
DUNCAN GRAY,
IL J* " l J-
ALLEGRETTO V ^ j T~~7 T I -
:zfc
-»— -
:t
Dun - can Gray cam' here to woo, Ha, lia, the
ft===t
#=B=^-3^

woo - ing o"t ; On blythe Yule night, when we were fu','
=P=S=
Ha, ha, tlic
^^
-^H g -
woo - ing o't.
Mag - gie coost 3 her head fu' 3 heigh, 4 Look'd a - sklent/' and
IH
^
ss
w&
jtZZX.
un - co G skeigh, 7 Gart 8 poor Dun - can stand a - beigh f Ma. lia, tlie woo - ing o't.
Duncan fleech'd, 10 and Duncan pvay'd.
Ha, ha, the wooing o't,
Meg was deaf as Ailsa Craig,"
Ha, ha, the wooing o't.
Duncan sigli'd baith out and in,
Grat 1! his een baith bleer'd" and blin', 14
Spak' o' lowpin' 16 o'er a linn, 1 "
Ha, ha, the wooing o't.
How it comes, let doctors tell.
Ha, ha, the wooing o't,
Meg grew sick as he grew well,
Ha, ha, the wooing o t.
Something in her bosom wrings,
For relief a sigh she brings ;
And 0, her e'en, they spak' sic tilings !
Ha, lia, the wooing o't.
Time and chance are but a tide,
Ha, ha, the wooing o't,
Slighted love is sair" to bide, 18
Ha, lia, the wooing o't.
Shall I, like a fool, quo' he,
For a haughty hizzie ' 9 die ?
She may gae to — France for me !
Ha, iia, the wooing o't.
Duncan was a lad o' grace,
Ha, ha, the wooing o't,
Maggie's was a piteous case,
Ha, ha, the wooing o't.
Duncan couldna be her death,
Swelling pity smoor'd 50 his wrath ;
Now they're crouse 21 and canty 2 - baith
Ha, ha, the wooing o't.
1 Tipsy. '- Cast. : > Full. 1 High. Askance. fl Very.
7 Proud ; saucy. 8 Made ; furced. 9 At a shy distance. 10 Supplicated flatteringly.
11 A remarkably large and lofty rock, rising in the firth of Clyde, between the coasts of Ayrshire and Kintyre. l - Wept.
■ 3 Bleared. "Blind. "Leaping. »<> A waterfall ; a precipice. 17 Sore: painful.
18 Bear ; endure. w A young girl. *> Smothered. 21 Cheerful.. "Merry.
" Duncan Ghay." " It is generally reported," says Mr. Stenhouse, " that this lively air was composed by Duncan
Gray, a carter or carman in Glasgow, about the beginning of last century, and that the tune was taken down from
his whistling it two or three times to a musician in that city. It is inserted both in Macgibbon and Oswald's Collec-
tions." See Museum Illustrations, vol. ii. page 148. The words given in this work are those written by Burns in
December 17'.l2.

Images and transcriptions on this page, including medium image downloads, may be used under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence unless otherwise stated. Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence