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Collected works > Edinburgh edition, 1894-98 - Works of Robert Louis Stevenson > Volume 11, 1895 - Miscellanies, Volume III

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THE DAY AFTER TO-MORROW
sieve of dangers that we call Natural Selection, to
sit down with patience in the tedium of safety ; the
voices of its fathers call it forth. Already in our
society as it exists, the bourgeois is too much cot-
toned about for any zest in living; he sits in his
parlour out of reach of any danger, often out of
reach of any vicissitude but one of health ; and
there he yawns. If the people in the next villa took
pot-shots at him, he might be killed indeed, but so
long as he escaped he would find his blood oxygenated
and his views of the world brighter. If Mr. Mal-
lock, on his way to the publishers, should have his
skirts pinned to the wall by a javehn, it would not
occur to him — at least for several hours — to ask if
life were worth living ; and if such peril were a daily
matter, he would ask it never more ; he would have
other things to think about, he would be living
indeed — not lying in a box with cotton, safe, but
immeasurably dull. The aleatory, whether it touch
life, or fortune, or renown — whether we explore
Africa or only toss for halfpence — that is what I
conceive men to love best, and that is what we are
seeking to exclude from men's existences. Of all
forms of the aleatory, that which most commonly
attends our working men — the danger of misery
from want of work — is the least inspiriting : it does
not whip the blood, it does not evoke the glory of
contest ; it is tragic, but it is passive ; and yet, in so
far as it is aleatory, and a peril sensibly touching
them, it does truly season the men's lives. Of those
who fail, I do not speak — despair should be sacred ;
297

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Early editions of Robert Louis Stevenson > Collected works > Works of Robert Louis Stevenson > Miscellanies, Volume III > (313) Page 297
(313) Page 297
Permanent URLhttps://digital.nls.uk/90460530
Volume 11, 1895 - Miscellanies, Volume III
DescriptionContents: Virginibus Puerisque; Later Essays: Fontainbleau, Realism*, Style*, Morality*, Books which have Influenced Me, Day after Tomorrow*, Letter to a Young Gentleman, Pulvis, Christmas Sermon, Damien.
ShelfmarkHall.275.a
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Dates / events: 1895 [Date published]
Subject / content: Essays
Anthologies
Edinburgh edition, 1894-98 - Works of Robert Louis Stevenson
DescriptionEdinburgh edition. Edinburgh: Printed by T. and A. Constable for Longmans Green and Co, 1894-98. [28 volumes in total, only some of which NLS has digitised.]
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Form / genre: Written and printed matter > Books
Dates / events: 1894-1898 [Date printed]
Places: Europe > United Kingdom > Scotland > Edinburgh > Edinburgh (inhabited place) [Place printed]
Subject / content: Collected works
Person / organisation: Chatto & Windus (Firm) [Distributor]
Stevenson, Robert Louis, 1850-1894 [Author]
T. and A. Constable [Printer]
Longmans, Green, and Co. [Publisher]
Colvin, Sidney, 1845-1927 [Editor]
Collected works
Early editions of Robert Louis Stevenson
DescriptionFull text versions of early editions of works by Robert Louis Stevenson. Includes 'Kidnapped', 'The Master of Ballantrae' and other well-known novels, as well as 'Prince Otto', 'Dynamiter' and 'St Ives'. Also early British and American book editions, serialisations of novels in newspapers and literary magazines, and essays by Stevenson.
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Person / organisation: Stevenson, Robert Louis, 1850-1894 [Author]
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