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Year.
Inches.
Year.
Inches.
Year.
Inches.
1873 ... ...
69.70
J886 ... ...
99.74
1899 ... ...
35.90
1874 ... ...
82.18
1887 ... ...
94.95
1900 ... ...
69.12
1875 ... ...
78.29
1888 ... ...
57 82
1901 ... ...
7532
1876 ... ...
46.70
1889 ... ...
67.84
1902 ... ...
71.97
1877 ... ...
61.73
1890 ... ...
65.18
1903 ... ...
84.49
1878 ... ...
106.13
1891 ... ...
77.18
1904 ... ...
83.42
1879 ... ...
61.40
1892 ... ...
95.12
1905 ... ...
33.66
1880 ... ...
67.94
1893 ... ...
67.24
1906 ... ...
56.30
1881 ... ...
73.04
1894 ... ...
66.85
1907 ... ...
100.78
1882 ... ...
69.23
1895 ... ...
6759
1908 ... ...
53 54
1883 ... ...
90.18
1896 ... ...
87.65
1909 ... ...
71.22
188t ... ...
75.44
1897 ... ...
81.53
1910 ... ...
67.83
1885 ... ...
67.91
1898 ... ...
74.09
5. The atmosphere of Bombay is generally moist, the lowest relative
humidity 0.668* occurs late in December. During December, January and
February it remains fairly uniform, but from then onwards gradually increases.
With the fall of temperature which occurs in June after the onset of the
rains the relative humidity increases, and. the maximum 0.867 is reached
about the middle of July. Prom July to September there is little fluctua-
tion but about the middle of October a somewhat sharp fall occurs. The
diurnal variations in the relative humidity is most marked in the dry weather.
In December when at 2 p.m. the humidity is only 0.554 at 6 a.m. it is
0.673 ; but in July the respective figures are 0.841 and 0.895.
6. The prevailing winds vary according to season. During the monsoon
months the wind blows from W.S.W. The maximum velocity is 18.8
miles per hour and is attained in July. By November the prevailing winds
come from the N.E., but from January onwards the easterly component
gradually disappears and is replaced in March by a westerly one. About the
middle of May the northerly component is replaced by a southerly one and
from then onwards south-westerly winds increase in strength to their maximum
in July.
Section 2.
7. THE POPULATION OF BOMBAY.-The population of Bombay is
an altogether abnormal one. it may be said to be composed of-
(1) A fixed and permanent population.
(2) A floating population (A) varying in numbers from year to year.
(3) A second floating population (B) varying in numbers from season
to season.
(4) A third floating population (0) composed of people passing through the
City and resident for only brief periods.
8. The fixed population mainly consists of those born in Bombay, together
with a certain number of persons from the Bombay Presidency and other
parts, who may be said to have made Bombay their home. The floating-
population (A) is composed of those who come to reside in Bombay for business
and other purposes, and who remain for periods of one or more years. The
floating population (B) consists of people of the labouring class, who visit
Bombay in search of employment during the dry weather, returning to their
own homes just before the onset of the rainy season. The floating population
(C) includes visitors for short periods, travellers by rail and steamer who
are constantly arriving and departing, the crews of vessels in the harbour and
pilgrims who pass through on their way to Mecca.
Of the total population more than four-fifths are concentrated in the
southern half of the island. Thus the one half of the island contains a
population averaging 200 to the acre, whereas the other shows an average of
only 20 to the acre.
9. There is probably no city in the world in which a larger number of
different races is to be met with than in Bombay ; this is shown by the fact
that at the Census of 1901, 62 different dialects were recorded as being spoken
in the City.
* 1.000 denotes complete saturation.

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