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'Foreigners'

New song called The dear and darling boy

[NLS note: a graphic appears here - see image of page]

   A New Song Called the

Dear and Darling Boy

When first un o this town I came,
W th you I fell in love,
And if I could but gain you,
I'd I'll never rove,
There ts not a girl in all this town,
I love as well as thee,
I'll rowl you in my arms,
My cushla gal ma chree.

My love she won't come nigh me,
Nor hear the moan I make,
Neither would she pity me,
Tho my poor heart should break,
If I was born of noble blood,
And she of low degree,
She would hear my lamentation,
And surely pity me.

Our ship is on the ocean,
Now ready for to sail
If the wind blow from he east,
With a sweet and pleasant gale,
If the wind blew from my love,
With a swee and pleasant sound
It is for your sake, my darling girl,
I'd range the nation round.

Nine months we are on the ocean,
No harbour can we spy
We sailed from the French landers
To harbours were nigh,
We sailed from the French Flanders
To harbours that were nigh,

Oh, fare you well, my darling girl,
Since you and I must part,
is the bright beams of your beauty
That stole away my heart,
But since it is my lot, my love,
To say that must go,

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            Brennan on the
                     Moor.

It's of a fearless highway man a story I will tell,
His name was Willy Brennan in Ire' nd he did dwell
It was on the Livart mountains h commenced his
wild career,
And many a wealthy gentlemen before him shook
with fear,
A brace or londed pistols he carried beth nighs and
day,
He neverrobbed a poor man upon the King's highway
But what he'd take from the rich like Turpin and
Black Bess.
He always divided it with the widow and orphan in
distress.
One night he robbed a packman, the name of Pedlar
Brown.
They travelled on together til the day began to dawn
The pedlar seeing his money gone, likewise his
watch and chain.
Ae at once encountered Brennan, and robbed him
back again.
One day on the highway, as Willy he sat down,
He met this mayor of Cashel a mile outside the town
The mayor he knew his features, I think young man
said he,
Your name is Willy Brennan, you must come along
with me.
As Brennan's wife hod gone to own, provisions for
to buy,
When she saw her Willy, she began to weep and cry
He says, " give me that tenpenno," as soon as Willy
spoke,
Shehanded him a blunderbus from underneath he
cloak,
Then with his loaded bluaderbus, the truth I will
unfold,
He made the mayor to tremble and robbed him of
his gold,
One hundred pound was offered for his apprehension
And he with bridle and saddle to the mountain did
rapair.
Then Brennan being an outlaw upon the mountains
high,
When cavalry and infantry to take him they did tr ,
He lavghed at them with scorn, until at length, '
said,
By a false-hearted young man was basely betrayed.
In the county of Tipperary, in a place they caried
Clonmore,
Willy and his comrade that day did suffer sore.
He amongst the tern whibh was thick upon the field
And nine wounds he did receive before that he did
yie d,
When Brennan and his comrade found they were
betrayed,
They with the mounted cavalry a noble battle made
He lost his foremost finger which was shot by a ball
So Brennan and his comrad were take a er all.
So when taken prisoners , ons they were bound.
And conveyed to Cloumel jail, strong walis surround
Farewell u to my wife and tomy children there,
Likewsse my aged father, he may shed tear me
To my loving mother, who tere her locks and cried
I wish Wi Brennan in the cradle you died

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