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Plater')
winds through the fertile vales of Melrose and Kelso, and, in a course of thirty miles, receives th
Gala, the Allan, the Leader, the Tiviot and the Eden. The Tiviot, which falls into the Tweed nearl;
opposite to Kelso, is a lovely river ; it passes through a vale to which it gives name, and, in a cours,
of from thirty to forty miles, receives the Borthwick, the Ale, the Slitterick, the Rule, the Jed, thi
Oxnam and the Keaile Waters, with many subsidiary streamlets. The Liddal (or Liddle) rises in ant
runs through the parish of Castletown ; it gives the name of Liddisdale to a division of the county
and for a distance of four or five miles forms the boundary with England : the streams tributary to tht
Liddal are the Hermitage, the Tweeden, the Tennis, the Kershope and the Blackburn. The Tyne anc
Coquet rivers have their origin in this county ; after which they enter England, and fall into the ses
at Tynemouth and Coquet Isle. The waters of Roxburghshire, while useful and ornamental to the
country through which they glide, possess considerable interest with both the antiquary and the poet
from the associations connected with their streams; for besides beiug frequently mentioned in the pages
of history, they have elicited laudatory strains from the Scottish lyrists — among the rest those of the
author of the Seasons. The principal Railways that have connection with this county are, the ' North?
British,' the ' Edinburgh and Hawick,' the ' York, Newcastle and Berwick,' and the ' Berwick and Kelso^
all branches of, or in connexion with the first mentioned line, these, besides the places indicated by theii:
designations, include various other towns in their respective routes. From Roxburgh, a branch fromthei
Berwick and Kelso line runs to Jedburgh.
The county of Roxburgh comprises thirty entire parishes, and five parts of parishes : it containsi
only one Royal Burgh— Jedburgh— which, in connexion with Haddington, Dunbar, North Berwick
and Lauder, returns one member to parliament ; and the county sends another.
POPULATION OP THE SHIRE, IN THE YEARS, 1801, 1811, 1821, 1831, 1841 AND 1851,;
The Italic letters p. b. and t. signify respectively Burgh, Parish and Town.
Ancrum p.
Ashkirk (o) p.
Bedrule p.
Boswell, Saint . .p.
Bowden p.
Castleton p
Cavers p.
Crailins; p.
Uckford p.
Ednam p
Hawick p. If t.
Hobkirk p.
Hounam p.
Jedburgh,... b. If p.
Kelso p.
Kirktown p.
Lilliesleaf ..... p,
Lindean, with-i
Galashiels(6 J - p
1801. 1811. 1821. 1831. 1841. 1851
1222
348
260
49'
829
1731
1382
669
9
598
2798
760
372
S834
1196
320
673
174
1309
396
235
50
865
1887
1402
695
1097
53;
36*8
709
373
4454
440S
287
755
175
1386
360
344
636
954
2038
1504
748
1!33
601
4387
652
327.
5251
4S60
315
779
187
1454
405
309
701
1010
2227
1625
733
1148
637
4970
676
260
5647
493i)
291
781
170
1407
563
256
747
857
213
1709
667
1069
61
6573
776
283
5116
532S
31
771
195
1554
578
240
884
981
2130
14
734
1073
658
780
720
25i
5476
5634
283
798
182
Linton p.
Makerstoun ....p.
Maxton p.
Melrose p.
Minto p.
Mort-battle p.
Oxnam p
Robertown (c) . . . .p.
Roxburgh p.
Selkirk(e) p.
Sniailholm p.
Southdean p.
Sprouston p.
Stitchel (d) p.
Teviothead p
Wilton p.
Yetholm p.
Total Population of Roxburghshire
1801. 1811. 1821. 1831. 1841. 185L I" 1
403
248
368
26.-5
477
785
68^
381
949
*446
697
1105
506
1307
1011
462
352
438
3132
514
983
727
328
946
'455
804
1199
522
1500
1138
458
345
463
3467
472
1070
693
384
926
"620
837
1371
451
1661
462
326
462
4339
4Hl
1055
676
424
962
*628
839
1384
434
iseh
1280 1289
526
355
450
5331
455
1051
653
418
979
"592
Si8
1439
462
1867
129,
630 i
345 i
550
7365
467
997
689
368
1)4-1
'617
845i
1424
426 I
550
2577
13 J2
33682 37186 40860 43613 46127 51828
-Vote. — (a) The parish of Ashkirk is partly in Selkirkshire; the entire population for 1851 is here entered.
(b) Galashiels is mostly in Selkirkshire ; the whole parish contains 3,014 inhabitants.
(c) Robertown and Selkirk parishes are mostly in the shire of Selkirk ; the former is entered partially here, the latter in
its shire.
(d) Stitchel parish is partly in Berwickshire ; the whole parish contains 832 inhabitants.
The total annual value of Real Property in Roxburghshire as assessed in April, 1315. amounted to £254,180; and the
amount assessed to the Property Tax, in 1843. to £264,321 5s. 8d. ; and as assessed to the Property and Income Tax in 1849,
to £306,315.
ANCRUM AND NEIGHBOURHOOD.
xjLNCRUM is a small village in the united parish of
Ancrum and Langnewton, 12 miles w. from Kelso, II e.
from Hawick, and 4 n. from Jedburgh ; pleasantly
situated on the right bank ol the water of Ale, about
a mile above its junction with the Teviot, and about 3
miles from the riawick branch of the North British
railway. Ancrum House, tbe resilience of Sir William
Scott, stands in a delightful position, and commands
some beautifully picturesque prospects; the trees in
the park are considered the oldest and finest in this
part of the country. At a short distance east of the
village stood Ancrum Castle; opposite to which, in
the face of a perpendicular rock, are some caves, sup-
posed to have been places of retreat in the troubles of
former jtges. In the earlv part of the last century the
banks of the Teviot and Ale, at this spot, were the
favourite haunt of Thomson, the poet of 'The Sea-
sons;' one of the caves just, mentioned is still pointed '■
out, in which, it is said, he frequently retired to in-
dulge his reveries, and on that account is called
'Thomson's cave;' his name is carved on the roof,
by (it is supposed) his own hand. Mount Teviot, the
residence of the Marquess of Lothian, is also in
the village. Dr. Bucban, the celebrated author of the
' Domestic Medicine' and other medical works, was
born in this village. Tne parish stretches six miles
along the north side of the river Teviot, and its
breadth is about four miles. A part of the Roman,
road that led from York to the banks of the Forth
passes through the north corner of the parish, and the
remains of a Roman encampment are likewise suffi-
ciently discernible.
POST OFFICE, Ancrum, Ann Scott, Post Mistress. — Letters (from Jedburgh) arrive every
morning at eight, and afternoon at ten minutes past four, and are despatched every afternoon atone, and
evening at six.

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