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(1023)
POST OFFICE REGULATIONS.
19
2. A packet posted -wholly unpaid is charged with
doable the book-postage ; and if posted partially pre-
paid, with double the deficiency.
8. A book-packet ma3 T contain any number of separ-
ate books or other publications, photographs (when
not on glass, or in cases containing glass or any like
substance), drawings, prints, or maps, and any quan-
liiy of paper, or any other substance in ordinary use
for writing or printing upon; and the books or other
publications, prints, maps, &c, may be either printed,
written, engraved, lithographed, or plain, or any mix-
ture of these. Further, all legitimate binding, mount-
ing, or covering of a book, &c, or of a portion thereof,
is allowed, whether such binding, &c, be loose ox
attached ; as also rollers in the case of prints or
maps, markers (whether of paper or otherwise) in
the case of books, pens or pencils in the case of
pocket-books, &c, and, in short, whatever is neces-
sary for the safe transmission of such articles, or
usually appertains thereto ; but the binding, rollers,
&c. must not be sent as a separate packet.
Circulars — i.e., letters which, according to internal
evidence, are being sent in identical terms to several
persons, and the whole or greater part of which is
printed, engraved, or lithographed — may also be sent
by book post.
4. But a book-packet may not contain any letter,
or communication of the nature of a letter* (whether
separate or otherwise), unless it be a circular letter;
nor any enclosure sealed or in any way closed against
inspection ; nor any other enclosure not allowed by
Eule 3. If this Rule be infringed, the entire packet
is charged as a letter, f
5. A book-packet may be posted either without a
cover (in which case it must not be fastened, whether
by means of gum, wafer, sealing wax, postage stamp,
or otherwise), or in a cover entirely open at both
ends, so as to admit of the contents being easily with-
drawn for examination ; J otherwise it is treated as a
letter. For the greater security of the contents,
however, it may be tied at the ends with string;
postmasters being authorized to cut the string in
such case, although if they do so they must again tie
up the packet.
6. No Book-packet may he above 5 lbs. in weight,
nor above 1 ft. 6 in. in length, 9 in. in width, or 6 in. in
depth, unless it he sent to or from one of the Govern-
ment Offices.
7. When, owing to a great and unusual influx of
letters, books, &c, the transmission or delivery of the
.letters would be delayed if the whole mail were dealt
with without distinction, book-packets may be kept
back till the next despatch, or delivery.
(6.) Abuse of the Book Post.
It seems to be but imperfectly understood, that
there is no legal way of sending a letter, other
than a circular letter, through the post for a postage
of a halfpenny, except by means of a post card.
* Entries merely stating who sends the book, &c, ot-
to whom it is given, are not regarded as a letter.
t It is the duty of Postmasters, whenever they have
ground for suspecting an infringement of any of the
above conditions, and occasionally even when there is
no ground for suspicion, to open and examine book-
packets posted at, or passing through, their office.
% In order to secure the return of hook-packets which
cannot be delivered, the names and addresses of the
senders should be printed or written outside; thus "From
of ."
A notion appears to prevail that, because a post
card, which is open to inspection, may have a letter
written or printed upon it, any card whatever, and
even any piece of paper, if only it be placed in an open
wrapper, may be sent through the post with a letter
written or printed upon it for a postage of a halfpenny.
It seems necessary, therefore, to explain for the
guidance of the public —
1. That the letter rate of postage must be prepaid
for any communication of the nature of a letter,
whether it be placed in a closed envelope or in
an open cover, unless a post card be used for the
purpose, or unless the letter be a circular letter, i.e.,
a letter having internal evidence that it is intended
for transmission in identical terms to several persons,
and the whole or greater part of which is printed,
engraved, or lithographed.
2. That cards having merely a halfpenny adhesive
stamp affixed to them must not bear any communica-
tion of the nature of a letter, unless it be a circular
letter.
Large numbers of letters, not being circular letters,
are from time to time found in halfpenny wrappers,
contrary to the express provisions of the book post ;
and, as the officers of the department are instructed
to surcharge all such letters with additional postage,
it will save not only trouble to the Post Office but
annoyance to the public, if care be taken always to
pay letter postage for letters other than circular
letters, unless they be written or printed on post cards.
(7.) Inland Card Post.
1. Official Post Cards impressed, or private Post
Cards embossed with a halfpenny stamp (adhesive
stamps not being accepted in payment of the post-
age), may be transmitted between places in the
United Kingdom with letters written upon the back.
2.. Both the "stout" and the "thin" cards may
be bought singly. Prices of each style are as follows: —
Stout Cards.
i
Thin Cards.
1
2
3
■ fd.
• l*d.
- 2d.
4 -
5 -
6 -
2frJ.
Sid.
4d.
1 1
1 2
3
f d. 1 4 -
■ ljd. 5 -
lfd. | 6 -
2id.
3d.
3R
S. The front (or stamped) side is intended for the
address only, in addition to the printed words " Post
Card " and " The address only to be written on this
side." There must be nothing else written, printed,
or otherwise impressed on it, nor must there be any
writing or printing across the stamp. On the reverse
side any communication, whether of the nature of a
letter or otherwise, may be written or printed. Nothing
whatever may be attached; nor ma}- the card be
folded, cut, or otherwise altered. If any one of these
rules be infringed, the card will be charged Id. on
delivery.
4. When, owing to a great and unusual influx of
letters, books, &c, the transmission or delivery of the
letters would be delayed if the whole mail were dealt
with without distinction, Post Cards (unless paid
for and posted as late letters) may he kept back
until the next despatch or delivery.
5. No card other than one of those issued by the
Government, or a private card embossed with a
halfpenny stamp at the Office of Inland Revenue,
Somerset House, will pass under a halfpenny stamp,
if it bear on it a written communication of the
nature of a letter (unless it be a circular letter).
6. For information as to the conditions under which,

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