Manuscript of Dr. David Livingstone's 'Narrative of an Expedition to the Zambesi and its Tributaries', 1865

Livingstone and his brother Charles spent many months after their return to Britain in 1864 writing his account of the second expedition. This published by John Murray as 'Narrative of an Expedition to the Zambesi and its Tributaries'. However both the trip and the publication were not as successful as his first trip published as 'Missionary Travels and Researches in South Africa '.

74468886

Copyright National Library of Scotland

xml mark-up QA

126

121


>is no one here, shall I cast him into the
long grass. Had the Dr. given the slightest
token of or even kept silent, never
there would strangers have been deceived by
that guide for in a troubling he would have
been where the wicked cease from troubling
we pushed on at last without guides, or only
with crazy ones, for oddly enough, we were often
under great obligations to the incidence of the
different villages. They One honoured us as we slept in the open air by
dancing and singing at our feet the whole
night. They sympathetic with as, probably
in the belief, that we belonged to their own
clap and uninfluenced by the general
opinion of their country men they really
pitied to and took kindly, to us and often guided
us faithfully from place to place, where
no sane man could be hired for love or money
independent
using of the
a
a

to

they
afterwards
assumed
when the
scourge
slave
passed
then
country
signals were
from
different
villages by
of

of defiance
and
sounded
in our ears
at voluble might
and occasionally we were kept awake
in expectation of an instant attack the whole
night. While Masal Kasa was rather anxious to show

what he could do
The perseverance of the explorers was finally
crowned with success for on the 18th of April
they discovered Lake Shirwa (a considerable
body of bitter water. Containing fish