First World War 'Official Photographs' > Photographers > John Warwick Brooke

(367) D.2842 - Crowd of women carpenters who work for Government contractors in France

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(367) D.2842 - Crowd of women carpenters who work for Government contractors in France

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First World War 'Official Photographs' > Photographers > John Warwick Brooke > (367) D.2842 - Crowd of women carpenters who work for Government contractors in France
(367) D.2842 - Crowd of women carpenters who work for Government contractors in France
Permanent URLhttp://digital.nls.uk/74547742
DescriptionFemale carpenters working in a yard surrounded by large wooden buildings. In the foreground a number of the women are standing around a large table, holding hammers. According to the original caption they are constructing sides for wooden huts. In the background more women are at work. Although not in uniform, most of the women are wearing similar clothing. Q.M.A.A.C. stands for Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. Women were involved in many aspects of war work, ranging from nursing and driving ambulances to cooking, store-keeping, clerical work and operating telephones. [Original reads: 'OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT IN FRANCE. Q.M.A.A.C. Crowd of women carpenters who work for Government contractors in France. Women carpenters at work in France. Constructing sides of wooden huts.']
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John Warwick Brooke
DescriptionJohn Warwick Brooke, of the Topical Press Agency, was the second British official war photographer to go to the Western Front in 1916. The demands placed on he and his colleague, Ernest Brooks, were heavy. They had to take as many photographs as possible, with as much variety as possible, a difficult task for two men covering an army of over two million. Despite this, Warwick Brooke managed to take what would become some of the most memorable images of World War I. As an officially appointed photographer, Warwick Brooke was assigned to the Western Front to follow the progress of the British Army. During his time there, between 1916 and 1918, Warwick Brooke is estimated to have taken over 4,000 photographs.
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Photographers
DescriptionPhotographs by named photographers.
First World War 'Official Photographs'
DescriptionBlack-and-white photographs mainly of the Western Front during the First World War. Official British war photographers took many of them for propaganda purposes. Unless otherwise stated, titles are the photographs' original captions. From the papers of Field Marshal (Earl) Haig (1861-1928). The Haig Papers also contain Douglas Haig’s diaries.
ShelfmarkAcc.3155
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