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Slavery

' Slavery ' contains the following 10 items:

Thumbnail for 'Blind boy'

(1) Blind boy [ID: 74891779]

Two ballads. Blind boy - first line reads: The blind boy's been at play, mother. Nelly Gray - first line reads: It's of an old green valley on old Kentucky shore. In two columns with an illustration above each.

Printer: Taylor, T., printer in Brick Lane, London

Date printed: 1860

Thumbnail for 'Bombardment of Algiers, or, downfall of slavery'

(2) Bombardment of Algiers, or, downfall of slavery [ID: 74892091]

First line reads: Come all you British seamen bold, wherever/ you may be. In one column with a woodcut above the title.

Printer: Pitts, John, 1765-1844

Date printed: 1816

Thumbnail for 'Don't be angry mother'

(3) Don't be angry mother [ID: 74892790]

Three ballads. Don't be angry mother - first line reads: Don't be angry, mother, mother. Massa's in the cold, cold ground - first line reads: Round de meadows am a ringing. I am not angry - first line reads: I am not angry, dearest boy.

Author: Foster, Stephen Collins, 1826-1864

Date printed: 1860

Thumbnail for 'Dying slave'

(4) Dying slave [ID: 74893090]

First line reads: For many long years I have been a poor slave. In one column with a woodcut above the title.

Printer: Jennings, J., printer in Fleet Street, London

Probable date printed: 1802-1809

Thumbnail for 'Please to purchase this paper'

(5) Please to purchase this paper [ID: 74629330]

" ... price one penny. Of a poor African, who escaped from slavery". Broadside in three columns with illustrations of slave ship and slaves in cotton fields.

Date printed: 1840

Thumbnail for 'Slavery days'

(6) Slavery days [ID: 74893861]

Slavery days - first line reads: I am thinking to day of dem years dat passed away. Wait till the moonlight falls on the water - first line reads: Cease your repining, bright eyes are shining.

Printer: White, John, printer in Liverpool

Date printed: 1860

Thumbnail for 'Uncle Tom's cabin'

(7) Uncle Tom's cabin [ID: 74894014]

Uncle Tom's cabin - first line reads: I'm thinking of poor uncle Tom. Cruiskeen lawn - first line reads: Let the farmer praise his ground as the/ huntsmen [sic] does his hounds. In two columns.

Printer: Henson, G., printer in Northampton

Date printed: 1860

Thumbnail for 'Female drummer'

(8) Female drummer [ID: 74894317]

Female drummer - first line reads: A maiden I was at the age of sixteen. The galley slave - first line reads: O think on my fate, once I freedom enjoy'd.

Printer: Walker, George, printer at North Shields

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Spotted cow'

(9) Spotted cow [ID: 74895472]

Spotted cow - first line reads: One morning in the month of May. Poor Tom - first line reads: Mas'r I can tell you nothing. Poor Tom - With an extract from 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' by Harriet Beecher Stowe as an introduction. The ballad is based on this passage. In two columns with an illustration above each.

Printer: Disley, Henry, fl. 1850-1878

Author: Stowe, Harriet Beecher, 1811-1896

Date printed: 1860

Thumbnail for 'Slave chase'

(10) Slave chase [ID: 74895898]

The slave chase - first line reads: Set ev'ry stitch of canvas to woo the fresh'ning wind. The brave old oak - first line reads: A song to the oak, the brave old oak. Kathleen Mavourneen - first line reads: Kathleen Mavourneen, the grey dawn is breaking. The star of Glengary - first line reads: The red moon is up on the moss-covered mountain. The words to "The slave chase" are by A. B. Reach and were possibly written for Henry Russell's "Negro life" of 1855. The words to "The brave old oak" are by H. F. Chorley. The words to "Kathleen Mavourneen" were written by Mrs. Crawford and those to "The star of Glengary" by Eliza Cook. In two columns with an illustration above each. Four ballads.

Printer: Walker, George, printer at North Shields

Date printed: 1855