Skip to main content

Literature & Theatre

' Literature & Theatre ' contains the following 65 items:

Thumbnail for 'Epilogue'

Epilogue [ID: 85063370]

" ... spoken by Mrs Mountfort at the Theatre Royal in Drury Lane". First line reads: As a Young Lawyer many Years will drudge. In one column. Price 2d.

Date printed: 1705

Thumbnail for 'Prologue spoken at the first opening of the Queen's new theatre in the Hay-Market'

Prologue spoken at the first opening of the Queen's new theatre in the Hay-Market [ID: 85447825]

A prologue spoken at the first opening of the Queen's new theatre in the Hay-Market - first line reads: Such was our builder's art, that soon as nam'd. Opening prologue paraphras'd in a familiar stile, for the better conception of the true meaning, and for the particular use of Mr. Jer. Collier - first line reads: Good people,/ This same theatre here being intended for pious and virtuous representati-/ons. In one column. Anonymous. By Sir Samuel Garth.

Author: Garth, Samuel, Sir, 1661-1719

Printer: Bragge, Benjamin

Date printed: 1705

Thumbnail for 'Durham garland'

Durham garland [ID: 85449155]

First line reads: A worthy lord of vast estate. In five columns with the title and woodcut above the first two; the columns are not separated by rules. The sheet has been split and mounted as two sheets .

Date printed: 1750

Thumbnail for 'Prologue for the musick'

Prologue for the musick [ID: 86027329]

" ... spoken on Tuesday, January the 4th, 1703". Prologue for the musick - first line reads: Such is, yee fair, your universal sway. Epilogue to the ladies - first line reads: With joy we see this circle of the fair. In one column.

Printer: Tonson, Jacob, 1655-1736

Date printed: 1704

Thumbnail for 'Janus, did ever to thy wond'ring eyes'

Janus, did ever to thy wond'ring eyes [ID: 86225467]

First line reads: Janus, did ever to thy wond'ring eyes. Title from first words of text. Anonymous. By Edmund Smith.

Author: Smith, Edmund, 1672-1710

Date printed: 1705

Thumbnail for 'Congratulatory poem to the King's Most Sacred Majesty, on the happy birth of the Prince of Wales'

Congratulatory poem to the King's Most Sacred Majesty, on the happy birth of the Prince of Wales [ID: 86225480]

First line reads: Joy to the greatest monarch of the earth! In one column.

Author: Behn, Aphra, 1640-1689

Date printed: 1688

Thumbnail for 'Modern Latin ode attempted in English'

Modern Latin ode attempted in English [ID: 86225481]

A translation of John Philips's 'Honoratissimo viro, Henrico St.--John'. First line reads: Kind friend, with whom I sip, and smoke,. Imprint from colophon. 'Price two pence'. Anonymous. By John Philips. In one column.

Author: Philips, John, 1676-1709

Date printed: 1707

Thumbnail for 'Epilogue to Mr Lacy's new play, Sir Hercules Buffoon, or, The poetical esquire'

Epilogue to Mr Lacy's new play, Sir Hercules Buffoon, or, The poetical esquire [ID: 86225483]

Imprint from colophon. First line reads: Methinks (right worthy friends) you seem to sit.

Author: Haines, Joseph, d. 1701

Date printed: 1684

Thumbnail for 'Fable of Midas'

Fable of Midas [ID: 86225484]

Anonymous. By Jonathan Swift. First line reads: Midas, we are in story told. In one column.

Author: Swift, Jonathan, 1667-1745

Date printed: 1712

Thumbnail for 'Ode in praise of musick'

Ode in praise of musick [ID: 86225485]

" ... Composed by Mr Charles King, in five parts, for the degree of Batchelour of Musick, perform’d at the Theatre in Oxford, on Friday the 11th of July, 1707". First line reads: Music soft charm of heav'n and earth. Presumably the music only is by King.

Composer: King, Charles, 18th century

Date printed: 1707

Thumbnail for 'Lenten prologue refus'd by the players'

Lenten prologue refus'd by the players [ID: 86313487]

Anonymous. By Thomas Shadwell. A reply to: Dryden, John:The medall (a satyre against sedition). First line reads: Our prologue-wit grows flat: the nap's worn off.

Author: Shadwell, Thomas, 1642?-1692

Date printed: 1683

Thumbnail for 'Prologue written by Mr Dryden, to a new play, call'd, The loyal brother, &c'

Prologue written by Mr Dryden, to a new play, call'd, The loyal brother, &c [ID: 86313489]

By John Dryden. "The loyal brother" was written by Thomas Southerne. First line reads: Poets, like lawfull monarchs, rul'd the stage. In one column. Includes "The epilogue by the same hand; spoken by Mrs. Sarah Cook".

Author: Dryden, John, 1631-1700

Author: Southerne, Thomas, 1660-1746

Publisher: Tonson, Jacob, 1655-1736

Date printed: 1682

Thumbnail for 'Poem on Prince Eugene'

Poem on Prince Eugene [ID: 86313500]

Anonymous. By Samuel Cobb. First line reads: So Tydeus look'd, when, single, he oppos'd. With a publisher's advertisement at foot of verso. In one column.

Author: Cobb, Samuel, 1675-1713

Printer: Baker, John, fl. 1680-1717

Date printed: 1712

Thumbnail for 'Prologue to the Squire of Alsatia'

Prologue to the Squire of Alsatia [ID: 86313505]

" ... Spoken by Mr Mountfort". First line reads: How have we in the space of one poor age. Printed in one column. Attributed to Thomas Shadwell. Imprint from colophon. Second sheet contains Epilogue.

Author: Shadwell, Thomas, 1642?-1692

Date printed: 1688

Thumbnail for 'Prologue to a new play call'd The disappointment, or, The mother in fashion'

Prologue to a new play call'd The disappointment, or, The mother in fashion [ID: 86313506]

Prologue to: Thomas Southerne. The disappointment, or The mother in fashion. "Epilogue by another hand" is by the Hon. John Stafford; see MacDonald. In one column. First line reads: How comes it, gentlemen, that now aday's. Second sheet contains Epilogue.

Author: Dryden, John, 1631-1700

Author: Southerne, Thomas, 1660-1746

Author: Stafford-Howard, John, d. 1714

Date printed: 1684

Thumbnail for 'Prologue and epilogue to the new comedy, called Sir Courtly Nice, or, It cannot be'

Prologue and epilogue to the new comedy, called Sir Courtly Nice, or, It cannot be [ID: 86766356]

First line reads: What are the charms by which these happy Isles. In one column. Imprint from colophon. Based on Moreto's play "No puede ser", which is itself an imitation of Lope de Vega's "Mayor imposible".

Author: Crown, Mr. (John), 1640?-1712

Date printed: 1685

Thumbnail for 'Prologue and epilogue, to the last new play; Constantine the Great'

Prologue and epilogue, to the last new play; Constantine the Great [ID: 86766357]

First line reads: What think ye meant wise providence, when first. In one column, with the epilogue printed on the verso. The prologue to the play by Nathaniel Lee was written by Thomas Otway; the epilogue by John Dryden.

Author: Dryden, John, 1631-1700

Author: Otway, Thomas, 1652-1685

Author: Lee, Nathaniel, 1653?-1692

Date printed: 1683

Thumbnail for 'Epigram on the Spectator'

Epigram on the Spectator [ID: 86766359]

Attributed to Nahum Tate. First line reads: When first the Tatler to a mute was turn'd. In one column. At the foot of the sheet and on the verso are advertisements for other books and pamphlets printed for Curll.

Author: Tate, Nahum, 1652-1715

Publisher: Curll, Edmund, 1675-1747

Date printed: 1712

Thumbnail for 'Garden plot'

Garden plot [ID: 86766360]

Price one penny. First line reads: When Naboth's vineyard look'd so fine. In one column. Sometimes attributed to William King.

Author: Swift, Jonathan, 1667-1745

Date printed: 1709

Thumbnail for 'Panegyrick on the author of Absolom and Achitophel'

Panegyrick on the author of Absolom and Achitophel [ID: 86766361]

" ... occasioned by his former writing of an elegy in praise of Oliver Cromwel, lately reprinted". First line reads: When old philosophers wrote the worlds birth. In one column. On John Dryden's "Poem upon the death of his late Highness Oliver, Lord Protector of England, Scotland, and Ireland. Sheet is signed on recto: A.

Date printed: 1681

Thumbnail for 'Prologue to the last new play A duke and no duke'

Prologue to the last new play A duke and no duke [ID: 86766429]

First line reads: Who would have thought to have seen so many here. Printed in one column. Anonymous. By Thomas Duffett. "A duke and no duke" was written by Nahum Tate. Includes "The epilogue, spoken by Mr. Haines".

Author: Tate, Nahum, 1652-1715

Author: Duffett, Thomas

Printer: Croom, George

Date printed: 1684

Thumbnail for 'Prologue to Mr Lacy's new play, Sir Hercules Buffoon or Poetical esquire'

Prologue to Mr Lacy's new play, Sir Hercules Buffoon or Poetical esquire [ID: 86766476]

Imprint from colophon. First line reads: Ye scribling fops, (cry mercy if I wrong ye).

Author: D'Urfey, Thomas, 1653-1723

Date printed: 1684

Thumbnail for 'Squirrel'

Squirrel [ID: 86766483]

First line reads: Dear William, didst thou never pop. In one column. Price 2 d.

Author: Prior, Matthew, 1664-1721

Date printed: 1706

Thumbnail for 'Prologue to the court'

Prologue to the court [ID: 86766531]

" ... on the Queen's birth-day, 1704". First line reads: The happy muse, to this high scene preferr'd. Anonymous. By William Congreve. In one column.

Author: Congreve, William, 1670-1729

Date printed: 1705

Thumbnail for 'Proper new ballad, breefely declaring the death and execution of 14 most wicked traitors'

(1) Proper new ballad, breefely declaring the death and execution of 14 most wicked traitors [ID: 74516000]

"Shrouded in glory, and with praise full blown,". A satire by an opponent of John Home's 'Douglas: a tragedy'. Verse: Rejoyce in hart good people all, In three columns and printed in black letter. T.D. (Thomas Deloney) at foot of text.

Printer: Allde, Edward, d. 1627

Author: Deloney, Thomas, 1543?-1600

Date printed: 1586

Thumbnail for 'Ivy green'

(2) Ivy green [ID: 74891191]

Two ballads. The ivy green is a poem from 'The Pickwick papers' set to music, first published 1836-1837. The ivy green - first line reads: Ah! a dainty plant is the ivy green. Woodman spare that tree - first line reads: Woodman spare that tree. Woodman spare that tree - Anonymous: By George Pope Morris. In two columns with a woodcut above each.

Author: Dickens, Charles, 1812-1870

Author: Morris, George Pope, 1802-1864

Probable date printed: 1836-1837

Thumbnail for 'Jack Rag'

(3) Jack Rag [ID: 74891326]

Jack Rag - first line reads: Although my name is Jack Rag, if you will list awhile. I'm seventeen come Sunday - first line reads: As I walked out one May morning. In two columns with a woodcut above the first.

Date printed: 1830

Thumbnail for 'Quakers comicall song'

(4) Quakers comicall song [ID: 74891338]

" ... sung by Mrs Willis at the new Playhouse, and in Mr Dogetts booth in Bartholomew Faire." First line reads: Amongst the pure ones all, which conscience doth profess, and yet that sort of/ conscience. In two columns with musical notation.

Date printed: 1815

Thumbnail for 'Song of Argus Zion on finding the ruins of Nineveh'

(5) Song of Argus Zion on finding the ruins of Nineveh [ID: 74891386]

First line reads: Arise, arise! ye nations! the day is near at hand. In two columns with an illustration beneath the title. Tune - Lowlands low.

Printer: Hodges, E., printer (from Pitts')

Date printed: 1860

Thumbnail for 'Prologue to the University of Oxford'

(7) Prologue to the University of Oxford [ID: 74891617]

First line reads: As wandring streams by secret force return. In one column. Price 2d.

Author: Steele, Richard, Sir, 1672-1729

Publisher: Lintot, Bernard

Date printed: 1706

Thumbnail for 'Whistling Will'

(8) Whistling Will [ID: 74891620]

In one column with a woodcut above the title. First line reads: As Wbistling [sic] Will came from the play.

Printer: Pitts, John, 1765-1844

Probable date printed: 1820-1844

Thumbnail for 'Authors and books'

(9) Authors and books [ID: 74891872]

First line reads: Part I./ 1. Brownrig of Exon's first and second tome. In two columns.

Author: Barksdale, Clement, 1609-1687

Date printed: 1685

Thumbnail for 'On a visit to Mr Groves' theatre of arts'

(10) On a visit to Mr Groves' theatre of arts [ID: 74892532]

" ... now exhibiting every evening with great applause, in the Calton Convening Hall, Regent Bridge". First line reads: Come! now let us visit the THEATRE OF ARTS. In one column. At foot of column above the imprint: Two performances each evening - First at 7 - Second at 9. Admission half the usual prices. Front seats 1s.; second seats, 6d.; gallery, 3d.

Printer: Glass, J. (John), printer in Edinburgh, fl. 1819-1841

Date printed: 1840

Thumbnail for 'Dissatisfied man; or Anything to make a change'

(11) Dissatisfied man; or Anything to make a change [ID: 74892679]

" ... a popular comic song". Two ballads. The dissatisfied man - first line reads: Existence is monotonous. I ain't such a fool as I look - first line reads: I was born in a country town. I ain't such a fool as I look - Tune: Major Longbow.

Author: Bruton, James, 1815-1867

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Epilogue to the new play of the Maid of Bristol'

(12) Epilogue to the new play of the Maid of Bristol [ID: 74893696]

First line reads: In times like these, the Sailor of our Play. Price 1d. or 9d. per dozen. The paper is pale blue. In one column.

Author: Colman, George, 1762-1836

Printer: Cox, Son & Baylis

Date printed: 1803

Thumbnail for 'Old gentleman's wish, or The reformed old gentleman'

(13) Old gentleman's wish, or The reformed old gentleman [ID: 74893846]

In two columns. [Possibly published with another item - 'Authors and books': Crawford.EB.1713] Signed: C.B., i.e. Clement Barksdale. First line reads: I am grown old, alas!

Author: Barksdale, Clement, 1609-1687

Date printed: 1685

Thumbnail for 'I'm o'er young to marry yet'

(14) I'm o'er young to marry yet [ID: 74893852]

Two ballads. I'm o'er young to marry yet - first line reads: I am my mammy's ain bairn. I'm o'er young to marry yet: Sung by Miss Abbey, of the theatre, Durham. Poor Mary of the silvery tide - first line reads: It is of a fair young creature who dwelt by the sea side.

Author: Burns, Robert, 1759-1796

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'To the friends of virtue and liberty'

(15) To the friends of virtue and liberty [ID: 74894047]

On the controversy which arose in 1767 upon the awarding of a royal patent, allowing plays to be performed legally, to David Ross, manager of the Canongate theatre? Opposition to this was led by George Stayley. First line reads: Is there a man.

Date printed: 1767

Thumbnail for 'Tady Blany, a new song'

(22) Tady Blany, a new song [ID: 74894566]

" ... Sung by Mr Bannister in the entertainment of the Touch Stone". First line reads: My name's Tady Blany, I'll be bound. In one column with a woodcut above the title and another at the foot of the column. ''The Touchstone' by Charles Dibdin.

Author: Dibdin, Charles, 1768-1833

Date printed: 1780

Thumbnail for 'Jenny Lind mania; or, The Swedish nightingale arrived at last'

(23) Jenny Lind mania; or, The Swedish nightingale arrived at last [ID: 74894830]

Jenny Lind first appeared in England in 1845. First line reads: Oh! is there not a pretty fuss.

Printer: A. Ryle and Co.

Date printed: 1845

Thumbnail for 'Sprig of shillelah and shamrock so green'

(24) Sprig of shillelah and shamrock so green [ID: 74894860]

" ... sung with unbounded applause by Mr Johnstone, of the Theatre Royal, Drury lane". First line reads: Och! love is the soul of a neat Irishman. In two columns with an engraving above the title. '473' is printed top left of the page.

Author: Lysaght, Edward, 1765-1814

Date printed: 1807

Thumbnail for 'Jenny Lind and poet B'

(25) Jenny Lind and poet B [ID: 74894989]

Jenny Lind made her first appearance on the English stage in 1845. First line reads: Oh what a precious uproar. Tune: Lucy Long.

Printer: Hodges, E., printer (from Pitts')

Date printed: 1845

Thumbnail for 'Copy of verses humbly presented to all my worthy masters and mistresses of the hamlet of Hammersmith, in the county of Middlesex'

(26) Copy of verses humbly presented to all my worthy masters and mistresses of the hamlet of Hammersmith, in the county of Middlesex [ID: 74895397]

First line reads: Prologue./ Once more, my gen'rous Sirs, I do appear. Three columns of text with a large woodcut above the title and eighteen woodcuts with captions surrounding the text on the sides and foot.

Author: Meredith, John

Printer: Bayley, Susannah

Date printed: 1793

Thumbnail for 'True coppy of the epilogue to Constantine the Great'

(27) True coppy of the epilogue to Constantine the Great [ID: 74895541]

" ... That which was first published being false printed and surreptitious ". First line reads: Our hero's happy in the plays conclusion. "Constantine the Great" is by Nathaniel Lee.

Author: Dryden, John, 1631-1700

Printer: Tonson, Jacob, 1655-1736

Author: Lee, Nathaniel, 1653?-1692

Date printed: 1684

Thumbnail for 'End of Covent Garden'

(30) End of Covent Garden [ID: 74895682]

Covent Garden Theatre was destroyed by fire on March 5th, 1856. First line reads: Poor Covent Garden is gone to pot.

Printer: Dever, W., ballad publisher

Date printed: 1856

Thumbnail for 'Pray Goody'

(31) Pray Goody [ID: 74895700]

" ... Sung by Mr Kelly, in Midas". First line reads: Pray, Goody, please to moderate. Printed at foot of the sheet: The music of the song may be had of G. Walker, No. 106, Great Portland Street, Mary-le-Boue [sic].

Printer: Pitts, John, 1765-1844

Probable date printed: 1802-1819

Thumbnail for 'Rustica Academiae Oxoniensis nuper reformatae descriptio'

(32) Rustica Academiae Oxoniensis nuper reformatae descriptio [ID: 74895814]

" ... in visitatione fanatica Octobris sexto, &c Ann Dom 1648 cum comitiis ibidem anno sequente: et aliis notatu non indignis". First line reads: Rumore nuper est delatum. In three columns. There are various manuscript corrections to the text.

Author: Allibond, John, 1597-1658

Date printed: 1705

Thumbnail for 'Epilogue to the Tragedy of Douglas'

(33) Epilogue to the Tragedy of Douglas [ID: 74908470]

" ... Spoke by the Author". Verse - "Shrouded in glory, and with praise full blown,". A satire by an opponent of John Home's 'Douglas: a tragedy'.

Date printed: 1756

Thumbnail for 'Dog and the moon'

(34) Dog and the moon [ID: 74895997]

A fable. Possibly on the controversy which arose in 1767 upon the awarding of a royal patent, allowing plays to be performed legally, to David Ross, manager of the Canongate theatre? Opposition to this was led by George Stayley. The dog and the moon - first line reads: A snarling cur, which could not bear. A poem, on reading the fable of the dog and moon - first line reads: Hide, Cynthia, hide thy silver face. In two columns.

Date printed: 1767

Thumbnail for 'Geo Leybourne's up the monument'

(36) Geo Leybourne's up the monument [ID: 74896030]

Geo. Leybourne's up the monument - first line reads: Some like to spend their leisure time. George Leybournes artful Joe - first line reads: Oh! my father was the owner of a baked potatoe can.

Author: Leybourne, George, 1842-1884

Date printed: 1865