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Patriotism

' Patriotism ' contains the following 73 items:

Thumbnail for 'Island of Britain'

Island of Britain [ID: 85446942]

"A loyal song - 1803". The island of Britain - first line reads: My friends, ye have heard, in the late British wars. The island of Britain - tune: Hearts of Oak. From the British Neptune, Sunday, Aug. 28, 1803. New God save the king - first line reads: Sound trumpets, beat your drums. New God save the king: From the British Neptune, Sunday, Sept. 4, 1803. The ploughman's ditty: being an answer to that foolish question, "What have the poor to lose?" - first line reads: Because I'm but poor.

Date printed: 1803

Thumbnail for 'Advance, Britannia's sons'

(1) Advance, Britannia's sons [ID: 74891173]

" A new patriotic song". First line reads: Advance! Britannia's sons advance! In two columns with a woodcut above the title and three above the imprint.

Printer: Nicholson, J. (John), printer in Kirkcudbright

Probable date printed: 1853-1856

Thumbnail for 'To the citizens'

(2) To the citizens [ID: 74891350]

First line reads: And shall the patriot who maintain'd your cause. In one column. Signed: M.B. Formerly attributed to Jonathan Swift. Sometimes now attributed to Mary Barber. A poem addressed to the inhabitants of Dublin, with respect to William Wood's coinage.

Date printed: 1724

Thumbnail for 'New song on the volunteers for the Pope'

(3) New song on the volunteers for the Pope [ID: 74891416]

The ballad concerns the raising of an Irish Brigade by Archbishop Paul Cullen to fight in Italy for Pius IX and the Papal States against Garibaldi and the Italian patriots. The Brigade was raised in 1860. First line reads: Arouse, you Romans of tribulation, it threatens both your/ Church and Creed.

Date printed: 1860

Thumbnail for 'Old England for ever'

(4) Old England for ever [ID: 74891602]

" ... and do it no more". First line reads: As the Q- and P-A, so bucksome and all pert. In two columns.

Printer: Birt, Thomas, fl. 1824-1841

Probable date printed: 1833-1841

Thumbnail for 'Bubblers mirrour; or, Englands folly'

(5) Bubblers mirrour; or, Englands folly [ID: 74891755]

A broadside on the South Sea bubble. First line reads: Behold a canting miser who of late. Includes: 'A list of the bubbles, and the prices they were subscrib'd at, and what each sold when highest. Together with satyrical eppigrams upon each ...'. Edward Ward is the author of 'A list of the bubbles'.

Publisher: Bowles, Carington, 1724-1793

Date printed: 1720

Thumbnail for 'Leinster war song'

(6) Leinster war song [ID: 74891803]

First line reads: Bondsmen! - compatriots! - ocoff [sic] of the/ stranger. In two columns with a woodcut above the title. Air: - Araby's daughter.

Date printed: 1860

Thumbnail for 'Bonaparte answered; or, the Briton's war song'

(7) Bonaparte answered; or, the Briton's war song [ID: 74891812]

First line reads: Bow, Britons! bow the haughty head. In one column. One halfpenny each, or 30 for 1s. 6d. or 2s. 6d. per hundred for distribution. --- Printed for J. Ginger, 169, Piccadilly; where a variety of patriotic hand-bills and songs may be had.

Publisher: Ginger, J.

Date printed: 1803-1804

Thumbnail for 'Invasion'

(8) Invasion [ID: 74891824]

" ... a new song". First line reads: Britons! cease your long forbearing. In one column. Signed at foot: Greenwich. H. P. One halfpenny each, or 50 for 1s. 6d. or 2s. 6d. per hundred for distribution. - Printed for J. Ginger, 169, Piccadilly; where a variety of patriotic hand-bills and songs may be had.

Publisher: Ginger, J.

Date printed: 1803-1804

Thumbnail for 'British loyalty or a squeeze for St Paul's'

(9) British loyalty or a squeeze for St Paul's [ID: 74891899]

First line reads: Can any tell - (since Adam's time I mean). In two columns. At foot of sheet between the columns: Price three-halfpence.

Author: Colman, George, 1762-1836

Date printed: 1789

Thumbnail for 'King of Sardinia's visit to England'

(10) King of Sardinia's visit to England [ID: 74891944]

The visit took place in 1855. First line reads: Cheer up, cheer up, Great Britain's Isle. In two columns with an illustration beneath the title.

Date printed: 1855

Thumbnail for 'John Bull's invitation to Bonaparte'

(11) John Bull's invitation to Bonaparte [ID: 74891971]

" ... A new song". First line reads: The Chief consul declares that to England he'll come. In one column. Tune: - A cobler there was. Signed at foot: A volunteer. One halfpenny each, or 50 for 1s. 6d. or 2s. 6d. per hundred for distribution. Printed for J. Ginger, 169, Piccadilly; where a variety of patriotic hand-bills and songs may be had.

Date printed: 1803-1804

Thumbnail for 'Come all you British seamen bold'

(12) Come all you British seamen bold [ID: 74892016]

Two ballads. Come all you British seamen bold - first line reads: Come all you British seaman [sic] bold, And listen unto me. When John's ale was new - first line reads: There was two jolly tradesmen.

Printer: Harkness, John, b. 1814

Probable date printed: 1840-1866

Thumbnail for 'Trades unions of England, Huzza'

(13) Trades unions of England, Huzza [ID: 74892052]

Two ballads. Dated at foot in ink, in contemporary(?) hand: April 21: 1834. First line reads: Come all you bold Britons attend to my rhymes. In two columns with an illustration above the title.

Printer: Taylor, W. (William), fl. 1831-1836

Date printed: 1834

Thumbnail for 'Brags of Washington'

(14) Brags of Washington [ID: 74892064]

First line reads: Come all you brave seamen and landsmen/ likewise. In one column with a woodcut avove the title. Concerning the war with America.

Date printed: 1775

Thumbnail for 'Louis Kossuth's welcome to England'

(15) Louis Kossuth's welcome to England [ID: 74892136]

This ballad concerns Kossuth's visit (or exile?) to England in 1849. First line reads: Come all you gallant Britons bold. In two columns.

Date printed: 1849

Thumbnail for 'Great meetings in England, or, the free trades & Protectionests [sic]'

(16) Great meetings in England, or, the free trades & Protectionests [sic] [ID: 74892139]

First line reads: Come all you gallant Englishmen & listen to my song. In two columns with an illustration above the first.

Printer: Hodges, M. A.

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Glories of Tara Hill'

(17) Glories of Tara Hill [ID: 74892253]

The ballad is concerned with the repeal demonstration which took place on Tara Hill near Dublin on the 22nd May 1845. First line reads: Come all you loyal patriots I hope you will combine.

Printer: Balchin, W.

Date printed: 1845

Thumbnail for 'Britons united, or the downfal of tyranny'

(18) Britons united, or the downfal of tyranny [ID: 74892316]

The ballad 'Britons united' anticipates the coronation of William IV and Queen Adelaide, this took place in 1831. Britons united - first line reads: Come all you true-bred Englishmen, where'er you may be. Britons united - there are some corrections to the text in contemporary(?) hand. Britain's watch-word - first line reads: Hail Britain! highly-favoured land!

Printer: King, W. (William) printer in Oxford

Date printed: 1830

Thumbnail for 'Wheels of the world'

(19) Wheels of the world [ID: 74892334]

Wheels of the world - first line reads: Come all you true sons of old Erin, attend to these few simple lines. The heroes of the ninety-eight - first line reads: Ye true born heroes I hope you will now lend an ear.

Date printed: 1860

Thumbnail for 'Word to the wise, or Old England for ever'

(20) Word to the wise, or Old England for ever [ID: 74892388]

" ... A new song for Christmas 1792". First line reads: Come, cheer up, my Lads, merry Christmas is here. In one column. In this edition the verses are unnumbered.

Date printed: 1792

Thumbnail for 'English, Scots, and Irishmen'

(21) English, Scots, and Irishmen [ID: 74892748]

" ,,, A patriotic address to the inhabitants of the United Kingdom". First line reads: English, Scots, and Irishmen. In two columns with a coat of arms in the title.

Author: Mayne, John, 1759-1836

Printer: Wilson, Andrew, fl. ca. 1793-1842

Date printed: 1803

Thumbnail for 'Erin's lads and lasses, o'

(22) Erin's lads and lasses, o [ID: 74892757]

" ... a song for the millions". First line reads: Erin's lads and lasses, O. In one column. Air: - Green grow the rashes, o. At foot of text: Shemus of Ullina.

Date printed: 1860

Thumbnail for 'Irish brigade'

(23) Irish brigade [ID: 74892889]

The first ballad concerns the raising of an Irish Brigade by Archbishop Paul Cullen to fight in Italy for Pius IX and the Papal States against Garibaldi and the Italian patriots. The Brigade was raised in 1860. The Irish brigade - first line reads: Hibrnias [sic] sweet Harp from your slumber awaken. The Fenian men - first line reads: See who comes over the red blossomed/ heather.

Date printed: 1860

Thumbnail for 'Manchester patriot martyrs'

(24) Manchester patriot martyrs [ID: 74892895]

Two ballads. William Phillip Allen, Michael Larkin and Michael O'Brien, the Manchester martyrs, were executed on 23rd November 1867. The Manchester patriot martyrs - first line reads: High upon the gallows tree. Believe me, if all those endearing young charms.

Date printed: 1867

Thumbnail for 'England'

(25) England [ID: 74892943]

" ... home of the world". England: home of the world - first line reads: Hail to thee, England! blest Isle of the ocean. No, my love, not I - first line reads: As I was walking one morning in May.

Printer: Walker, George, 1758-1835

Date printed: 1830

Thumbnail for 'Wooden walls of old England'

(26) Wooden walls of old England [ID: 74893684]

First line reads: In the model I'm bringing before ye. In one column with a woodcut above the title.

Printer: William & John Shelmerdine (Firm)

Date printed: 1830

Thumbnail for 'My native land so green'

(27) My native land so green [ID: 74893813]

First line reads: I am a true born Irishman I came from Paddy's land. In one column with an illustration above the title.

Printer: Brereton, P., printer in Dublin

Date printed: 1867

Thumbnail for 'Patriot brave'

(28) Patriot brave [ID: 74893891]

The patriot brave - first line reads: I drink to the valiant who combat. What Paddy can say more - first line reads: Last night while sitting by the fire. What Paddy can say more: Air- Nothing more.

Date printed: 1870

Thumbnail for 'My native land so green'

(29) My native land so green [ID: 74893960]

First line reads: I am a true born Irishman I came from Paddy's land. In one column with an illustration above the title and another at the foot of the column.

Date printed: 1870

Thumbnail for 'Kossuth in England'

(30) Kossuth in England [ID: 74894152]

This ballad concerns Kossuth's visit (or exile?) to England in 1849. First line reads: Kossuth is my name, as lively as a fairy. In two columns with an illustration above the first.

Date printed: 1849

Thumbnail for 'John Bull and his rhubarb'

(31) John Bull and his rhubarb [ID: 74894173]

1850 is written in pencil beneath the imprint. First line reads: Last Sunday morning in full glee. In two columns.

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Britons' defiance to France'

(32) Britons' defiance to France [ID: 74894311]

First line reads: Mad with the plunder of the world. Tune: Can of grog. In one column. Signed at foot: R.B. One halfpenny each, or 50 for 1s. 6d. or 2s. 6d. per hundred for distribution.

Printer: Ginger, J.

Date printed: 1803

Thumbnail for 'Merrily, o! or, The Tyrolese song of liberty'

(33) Merrily, o! or, The Tyrolese song of liberty [ID: 74894362]

First line reads: Merrily ev'ry bosom boundeth. In one column with a woodcut above the title.

Composer: Moore, Thomas, 1779-1852

Publisher: Dickinson, Bernard William, fl. 1823-1834

Probable date printed: 1823-1834

Thumbnail for 'Word to the wise'

(34) Word to the wise [ID: 74894389]

" ... a new ballad on the times". First line reads: The monsieurs they say have the world in a string. In one column with a woodcut above the title.

Date printed: 1820

Thumbnail for 'Word to the wise'

(35) Word to the wise [ID: 74894416]

" ... a new ballad on the times". First line reads: The mounseers they say have the world in a string. In one column.

Date printed: 1830

Thumbnail for 'Our ancesters [sic] were Englishmen'

(36) Our ancesters [sic] were Englishmen [ID: 74894437]

Our ancesters were English - first line reads: My ancestors were Englishmen, an Englishman am I. The morn was gay - first line reads: The morn was gay, but the bride wept fast.

Printer: Walker, George, 1758-1835

Date printed: 1830

Thumbnail for 'England and Napoleon'

(38) England and Napoleon [ID: 74894743]

First line reads: Oh! have you heard the news of late. In two columns.

Date printed: 1855

Thumbnail for 'We've just come home from Germany'

(39) We've just come home from Germany [ID: 74894788]

Dated in pencil beneath the imprint '1847'. First line reads: Oh! here we are again John Bull. In two columns.

Date printed: 1847

Thumbnail for 'Poor working man'

(40) Poor working man [ID: 74895100]

First line reads: Old England my country, my own native land. In two columns.

Printer: White, John, printer in Liverpool

Date printed: 1875

Thumbnail for 'Conversation of old England in 1854'

(41) Conversation of old England in 1854 [ID: 74895364]

First line reads: Now what is your opinion of the russians and the/ turks? In two columns.

Printer: Marks, John, printer in Brick Lane, London

Date printed: 1854

Thumbnail for 'Irishman's glory shines brighter than gold'

(42) Irishman's glory shines brighter than gold [ID: 74895664]

Irishman's glory shines brighter than gold - first line reads: Poets may pen the fame of each nation. Patrick O'Neill - first line reads: On April the first I set out like a fool.

Date printed: 1870

Thumbnail for 'Much admired national song entitled O'Donnell abu'

(43) Much admired national song entitled O'Donnell abu [ID: 74895736]

" ... A D 1597". First line reads: Proudly the notes of trumpet is sounding. In one column with an illustration above the title.

Date printed: 1870

Thumbnail for 'Sons of glorious France'

(44) Sons of glorious France [ID: 74895739]

First line reads: The prussians we cast of victorious won by cannon sword &/ lance. Air: My boat is on the shore. In one column with an illustration above the title.

Printer: Brereton, P., printer in Dublin

Date printed: 1870

Thumbnail for 'Old flag'

(45) Old flag [ID: 74895763]

First line reads: Raise the old flag! - Dangers dawn. In one column. Printed at the foot of the text: Joseph Edmundson Masterson. The paper has been coloured green.

Date printed: 1880

Thumbnail for 'Lines written on the monument of Daniel O'Connell'

(46) Lines written on the monument of Daniel O'Connell [ID: 74895775]

On the celebrations to mark the laying of the foundation stone of the O'Connell monument on Monday, August 8th 1864. The monument was not completed until May 1883. First line reads: praRejoice [sic] ye Irish patriots you lived to see the/ day. In two columns with an illustration above the title.

Date printed: 1864

Thumbnail for 'Parody by an honest Englishman'

(47) Parody by an honest Englishman [ID: 74895802]

First line reads: "Rouse Britannia ---- dangers call thee. In one column.

Printer: Ginger, J.

Date printed: 1803

Thumbnail for 'Resurrection of the potatoes'

(48) Resurrection of the potatoes [ID: 74895850]

" ... being an answer to the elegy on their death". First line reads: Saint Patrick, guardian of this isle. In two columns. A reply to 'Elegy on the much lamented death of those excellent patriots... the potatoes' (ESTC T032563).

Printer: Waters, Edward, fl. 1707-1740

Date printed: 1739

Thumbnail for 'Shannon & Chesapeake'

(49) Shannon & Chesapeake [ID: 74895913]

The Shannon & Chesapeake - first line reads: She comes, she comes in glorious style. The battle song - first line reads: March on, march on the trumpets sound.

Printer: Walker, George, 1758-1835

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Master Boney's hearty welcome to England'

(50) Master Boney's hearty welcome to England [ID: 74895940]

" ... being the song of songs, and worth all the songs in the world put together To be sung or said by every jovial fellow, who is a happy true lover of our good king and most happy constitution". First line reads: Should Boney come hither, the grave-ones they say. Printed above the title 'Third edition, with alterations, revised and corrected'. In two columns.

Date printed: 1803