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Politics & government

' Politics & government ' contains the following 321 items:

Thumbnail for 'Parody on the Mosaic account of the creation, and destruction of the world by the deluge'

Parody on the Mosaic account of the creation, and destruction of the world by the deluge [ID: 85447164]

" ... to the tune of Derry down : Published by Mr Thomas Harper of the ward of Farringdon Without; one of the candidates for the office of common councilman in that ward. Extracted verbatim from a work printed for and sold by him at 207, Fleet Street, entitled "The Constitution of Freemasonry, or Ahiman Rezon; to which is added a selection of Masonic songs, &c. revised, corrected, and improved, with additions, from the original of the late Lawrence Dermott, Esq. By Thomas Harper, deputy Grand-master. London: Printed by T. Burton, Little Queen Street, for the editor. 1801." Octavo. Song xxxiv. pages 175-179." First line reads: Pray lend me your ears, my dear brethren, awhile. A satire on Freemasonry: with a satirical account of a meeting of the inhabitants of Farringdon Without, held December 16th, 1820, printed on the verso. In two columns.

Printer: Burton, Thomas

Printer: Thomas, Edward, printer, of London

Probable date printed: 1820

Date printed: 1820

Thumbnail for 'On Her Majesty's grant of Woodstock Park, &c'

On Her Majesty's grant of Woodstock Park, &c [ID: 85447807]

" ... To His Grace the Duke of Marlborough, 1704. In a letter to Signior Antonio Verrio at Hampton-Court". First line reads: Renown'd in arms, when mighty heroes rise. In one column. Authorship attributed to Bainbrigg Buckeridge. The grant to Marlborough was due, in part at least, to victory at Blenheim - "Marlborough finally returned to London on 25 December 1704, and on 28 January 1705 the queen granted him the former royal manor of Woodstock, with its historical associations as the birthplace of the Black Prince and of the romantic liaisons of Henry II with his mistress, Rosamond Clifford. The grant included the hundred of Wotton, comprising together a total of some 22,000 acres in Oxfordshire, then estimated to produce revenue of about £6000 a year" (DNB).

Date printed: 1705

Thumbnail for 'Elogy, against occasion requires upon the Earl of Shaftsbury'

Elogy, against occasion requires upon the Earl of Shaftsbury [ID: 85447822]

"Calculated for the meridion of Eighty One." First line reads: At the West-End of th' Universal Frame. In one column. Signature mark on recto: A. In another edition, there is no comma after 'elogy'.

Date printed: 1681

Thumbnail for 'Pack of bear-dogs'

Pack of bear-dogs [ID: 85447823]

Also issued with the title 'The old pack'. A satire on the Whigs' pursuit of Sacheverell. First line reads: Come neighbours attend, while I tell you a story. In one column.

Printer: Waters, Edward, fl. 1707-1740

Date printed: 1713

Thumbnail for 'Essay of a character of the late Right Honourable Sir George Treby Kt'

Essay of a character of the late Right Honourable Sir George Treby Kt [ID: 86225414]

" ... Lord Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of Common-Pleas, by N. Tate, servant to His Majesty". First line reads: Indulge One Labour more, my drooping Muse.

Author: Tate, Nahum, 1652-1715

Printer: Roberts, Robert, d. 1702?

Date printed: 1700

Thumbnail for 'By the honourable Lady P----'

By the honourable Lady P---- [ID: 86225482]

" ... Paulo majora canamus". First line reads: Let those malicious pens that take delight. In one column.

Probable date printed: 1710-1725

Thumbnail for 'Second epistle to Mr Tickell'

Second epistle to Mr Tickell [ID: 86225487]

" ... author of the incomparable ode, call'd A voyage to France, &c". First line reads: O Tickell, greatly fated to inherit. Dated from the first epistle 'The tickler tickell'd' by Thomas Burnet. A satire on Tickell's 'Ode. Occasion'd by His Excellency the Earl Stanhope's voyage to France'. '(Price twopence.)' beneath imprint.

Date printed: 1718

Thumbnail for 'Virtues of Sid Hamet the magician's rod'

Virtues of Sid Hamet the magician's rod [ID: 86313490]

First line reads: The rod was but a harmless wand! Anonymous. By Jonathan Swift. A satire on Sidney Godolphin. In one column.

Author: Swift, Jonathan, 1667-1745

Date printed: 1710

Thumbnail for 'Prince Butler's tale'

Prince Butler's tale [ID: 86313491]

" ... representing the state of the wooll-case, or the East-India case truly stated". First line reads: Shews why in dogrel verse this tale. In two columns.

Printer: Baldwin, Ann, 1658-1713

Date printed: 1699

Thumbnail for 'Poem humbly dedicated to the Right Honourable William Lord Cowper, &c'

Poem humbly dedicated to the Right Honourable William Lord Cowper, &c [ID: 86313498]

Suggested date of publication from Foxon; Lord Cowper resigned as Keeper of the Great Seal, 23 Sept. 1710--DNB. First line reads: Since Britains seals to other hands are gone.

Date printed: 1711

Thumbnail for 'England's late jury'

England's late jury [ID: 86766019]

" ... a satyr". First line reads: Wisely an observator said. In two columns. Sometimes attributed to Daniel Defoe. In this edition there is a single rule above "Conclusion" on p. 2.

Date printed: 1701

Thumbnail for 'Black upon blue, or, A purging-potion for Father Ch--pp--n'

Black upon blue, or, A purging-potion for Father Ch--pp--n [ID: 86766355]

First line reads: Well, Ch--pp---n, is it come to this? In one column. A satire against Richard Choppin's electioneering.

Printer: Waters, Edward, fl. 1707-1740

Date printed: 1728

Thumbnail for 'Favourite, a simile'

Favourite, a simile [ID: 86766358]

Anonymous. By George Sewell. First line reads: When boys at Eton once a year. In one column. A satire on changes in political fortune. The imprint is false; possibly printed in London.

Author: Sewell, George, d. 1726

Date printed: 1712

Thumbnail for 'Confinement of the seven bishops'

Confinement of the seven bishops [ID: 86766362]

First line reads: Where is there faith, or justice to be found? In one column. Imprint from Wing.

Date printed: 1689

Thumbnail for 'Hymn preparatory to some electors'

Hymn preparatory to some electors [ID: 86766523]

" ... to be sung at the Scotch ambassadors on the comb, to the tune of Old Noll". First line reads: Great Beelzebub, patron of Whiggs. In one column. On verso: A strange and wonderful relation of the appearance of four men... 29th of September, 1713, in prose, signed J. Maclatchy. In prose and verse. An Edinburgh election ballad.

Author: Maclatchy, J.

Date printed: 1713

Thumbnail for 'Dialogue between Duke Lauderdale, and the Lord Danby'

Dialogue between Duke Lauderdale, and the Lord Danby [ID: 86766530]

First line reads: Great sir, I cannot but congratulate. In one column.

Date printed: 1679-1680

Thumbnail for 'Political alphabet for 1855'

(1) Political alphabet for 1855 [ID: 74891143]

First line reads: A - stands for old Lord Aberdeen. Air: The dickey birds. In two columns. At foot of ballad - J. Morgan.

Printer: Marks, John Lewis

Date printed: 1855

Thumbnail for 'Wonderful whale'

(2) Wonderful whale [ID: 74891146]

Two ballads. The text of 'The good ship Brittania' may refer to the Reform Act of 1867. The wonderful whale - first line reads: About a great Sea Snake you've heard. The good ship Brittania - first line reads: The good ship Brittania was launched on the sea. The wonderful whale - Air: The sea snake. (J. C. Davidson.). In two columns with a woodcut above the second.

Printer: Walker, George, printer at North Shields

Date printed: 1867

Thumbnail for 'Gallant specials'

(3) Gallant specials [ID: 74891251]

Ballad concerning the Chartist 'revolution' of 1848 when special constables were brought to defend London. First line reads: All you that are for a bit of fun. In two columns.

Printer: Birt, Thomas, fl. 1824-1841

Date printed: 1848

Thumbnail for 'Vote for Pim and Corigan and religious equality'

(4) Vote for Pim and Corigan and religious equality [ID: 74891290]

Corrigan stood and was elected Liberal MP for the city of Dublin in 1870 and he did not stand for re-election in 1874.

Date printed: 1870

Thumbnail for 'Welcome Louis Kossuth'

(5) Welcome Louis Kossuth [ID: 74891368]

The text mentions the date 'eighteen hundred and forty-nine' and concerns a visit (or exile?) of Kossuth's to England. First line reads: Arise! arise! Britannia's sons. In two columns with a coat of arms above the title.

Date printed: 1849

Thumbnail for 'Ballad'

(6) Ballad [ID: 74891389]

This ballad concerns the 1826 Northumberland election where there was no common ground between the candidates, and they were in fact bitterly opposed to one another. Lord Howick and Mr. Lambton (Whigs) were particularly hostile to Thomas Wentworth Beaumont, then an Independent Reformer, and the ill feeling came to a head on the 10th day. The end result was a duel taking place, early that morning, between Thomas Wentworth Beaumont and Mr. Lambton on the beach below Bamburgh Castle. First line reads: Arise Northumbrians, quickly rise. In two columns. At foot of text: May 12, 1826.

Printer: Boag, William, fl. 1825-1838

Date printed: 1826

Thumbnail for 'Paddie'

(7) Paddie [ID: 74891419]

" ... A new song sung at the theatre in Dublin by Dermet O'Brian". The ballad is a satire on Patrick Foster standing as a Parliamentary candidate for Edinburgh. First line reads: Arra Dermet, dear shoy, I will tell you fine news. In one column.

Date printed: 1747

Thumbnail for 'O'Connell & Granua in the Conciliation Hall'

(8) O'Connell & Granua in the Conciliation Hall [ID: 74891587]

O'Connell delivered several speeches in Conciliation Hall, Dublin in 1845 before the Loyal National Repeal Association. First line reads: As O'Connell & the members were talking of Erin.

Date printed: 1845

Thumbnail for 'State of Great Briton [sic] or, a touch on the times, for 1841'

(9) State of Great Briton [sic] or, a touch on the times, for 1841 [ID: 74891590]

First line reads: As old John Bull was walking. In two columns with a woodcut above the first.

Date printed: 1841

Thumbnail for 'State of Great Britain'

(10) State of Great Britain [ID: 74891593]

State of Great Britain - first line reads: As old John Bull was walking one morning free/ from pain. A lowly youth - first line reads: A lowly youth, the mountain child.

Probable date printed: 1833-1841

Thumbnail for 'New song on the Parliament 1653'

(11) New song on the Parliament 1653 [ID: 74891596]

First line reads: As Plutarch doth write, (a man of known credit). In one column.

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'John Bull & his party or, do it again'

(12) John Bull & his party or, do it again [ID: 74891611]

John Bull & his party - first line reads: As the shamrock, the rose, and the thistle were/ meeting. I'll not beguile thee from thy home - first line reads: I'll not beguile thee from thy home. In two columns.

Probable date printed: 1845-1848

Thumbnail for 'Abolition of the Corn Laws'

(14) Abolition of the Corn Laws [ID: 74891653]

The ballad is concerned with the proposed repeal of the Corn Laws, which eventually happened in 1846. First line reads: Attend awhile and you shall hear. In two columns. Tune: - King of the Cannibal Islands.

Printer: Birt, Thomas, fl. 1824-1841

Date printed: 1845

Thumbnail for 'Burning them out or, a flare up among the ladies'

(15) Burning them out or, a flare up among the ladies [ID: 74891656]

This ballad is probably concerned with the Metropolitan Police Act, 1839 where "Every common Prostitute or Nightwalker loitering or being in any Thoroughfare or public Place for the Purpose of Prostitution or Solicitation to the Annoyance of the Inhabitants or Passengers." and "Every Person who shall sell or distribute or offer for Sale or Distribution, or exhibit to public View, any profane, indecent, or obscene Book, Paper, Print, Drawing, Painting, or Representation, or sing any profane, indecent, or obscene Song or Ballad, or write or draw any indecent or obscene Word, Figure, or Representation, or use any profane, indecent, or obscene Language to the Annoyance of the Inhabitants or Passengers" would be liable to a penalty "not more than forty shillings". First line reads: Attend awhile both great and small. In manuscript beside title: Octr. 15: 1840.

Printer: Birt, Thomas, fl. 1824-1841

Date printed: 1839

Thumbnail for 'New gagging bill'

(16) New gagging bill [ID: 74891677]

First line reads: Attend to me and you shall see. In two columns.

Printer: Bebbington, John Oliver

Date printed: 1848

Thumbnail for 'Scene in high life'

(17) Scene in high life [ID: 74891683]

" ... the new steam carriage, &c". The text mentions 'B-'s Poor-Law Bill' perhaps a reference to the 1834 Poor Law Bill. Imprint reads: Reprinted from Pitts, London: Being an answer to the poisoned family. First line reads: Attend unto my ditty, & a story you shal [sic]/ hear. Tune: - The present fashions.

Printer: Pitts, John, 1765-1844

Date printed: 1834

Thumbnail for 'Gunpowder plot'

(18) Gunpowder plot [ID: 74891719]

Protestant song - first line reads: Awake, O ye Protestants/ timely awake. Gunpowder plot - first line reads: Remember, remember,/ The fifth of November. In two columns with a circular illustration between them.

Printer: A. Ryle and Co.

Probable date printed: 1846-1859

Thumbnail for 'Excellent new song to the tune of "Unfortunate Miss Bailey"'

(19) Excellent new song to the tune of "Unfortunate Miss Bailey" [ID: 74891728]

The song refers to Hobhouse, John Cam, Baron Broughton (1786-1869), politician, and the text mentions a bribery scandal - possibly the one referred to here - "On Melbourne's coming to power in July 1834 Hobhouse accepted the post of first commissioner of woods and forests. Melbourne's confidence in Hobhouse's loyalty may have been strengthened by his knowledge of the part he had played in discouraging Byron's elopement with Melbourne's late wife, Lady Caroline Lamb, on 29 July 1812. Melbourne and Hobhouse were often the sole guests at Buckingham Palace dinners. Hobhouse was returned for Nottingham at a by-election, also in July 1834. In 1841 he was accused of having won the by-election by bribery and intimidation (traditional approaches, without which campaigning in Nottingham would have been difficult) but was exonerated twice by select committee." (DNB) First line reads: A Baronet bold, as I've been told.

Date printed: 1834

Thumbnail for 'New song'

(20) New song [ID: 74891866]

First line reads: Brother Freemen, as many address you in prose. In one column. Tune: - Vicar and Moses.

Printer: Grosvenor and Hall

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'New Guy Fawkes speech'

(21) New Guy Fawkes speech [ID: 74891869]

" ... for the fifth of November". Above the woodcut in contemporary(?) hand: '1829'. First line of text reads: In the year 1605, and in the reign of James the First, a cabal, consisting of Jesuits. First line of ballad reads: But tho' Old Nic was their friend, the plot/ was found out.

Printer: Billing, E., fl. ca. 1802 - 1839

Date printed: 1829

Thumbnail for 'Blackbird of Avondale; or, the arrest of Parnell'

(22) Blackbird of Avondale; or, the arrest of Parnell [ID: 74891893]

Parnell was arrested in October 1881. First line reads: By the sweet bay of Dublin whilst carelessly strolling.

Date printed: 1881

Thumbnail for 'Jem Paull's address to his constituents; or, an excellent new song on the Westminster election'

(23) Jem Paull's address to his constituents; or, an excellent new song on the Westminster election [ID: 74891911]

This ballad appears to be a parody concerning the Scottish politician James Paull. He purchased a seat in the 1805 election and this ballad is likely to have been an attempt to discredit him in the campaigning for the 1806 election, hence the mention of his conections with other radical politicians (e.g. Sir Francis Burdett). First line reads: Cease, Sir Samuel, gallant Sailor! Tune: - The storm.

Printer: Boyle, Thomas, fl. 1806-1808

Date printed: 1806

Thumbnail for 'Release of C S Parnell'

(24) Release of C S Parnell [ID: 74891914]

Parnell was arrested in October 1881 and released in 1882. First line reads: The chain is broken again, he's free, our hope/ and Ireland's pride.

Date printed: 1882

Thumbnail for 'Chartist's flare-up on Witsun-monday [sic]'

(25) Chartist's flare-up on Witsun-monday [sic] [ID: 74891920]

First line reads: The Chartists all are going mad. In two columns with a woodcut above the first. Tune: - Paddy will you now.

Printer: Bebbington, John Oliver

Date printed: 1848

Thumbnail for 'England demands 'reform!' & reform she'll have'

(26) England demands 'reform!' & reform she'll have [ID: 74891935]

This ballad most likely concerns Disraeli's introduction of the Reform Act of 1867 and not the failed Bill of 1859. First line reads: Cheer up! Cheer up! Britannia/ cries. In two columns. Air: - Sweet little creature.

Date printed: 1867

Thumbnail for 'Great Catholic victory'

(27) Great Catholic victory [ID: 74891947]

" ... five Roman Catholics at the head of the poll". First line reads: Cheer up, cheer up, Hibernia's sons. In two columns. At foot of second column: Composed by John White.

Author: White, John

Date printed: 1880

Thumbnail for 'Jeannot's answer to Jeannette'

(28) Jeannot's answer to Jeannette [ID: 74891953]

Two ballads. Jeannot's answer to Jeannette - Cheer up, cheer up my own Jeannette tho' far away I go. Comic version of 'There's a good time coming' - first line reads: There's a good time coming, boys.

Printer: Walker, George, 1758-1835

Date printed: 1830

Thumbnail for 'Great chartist meeting'

(29) Great chartist meeting [ID: 74891959]

Ballad concerning the Chartist 'revolution' of 1848 when special constables were brought to defend London. First line reads: Cheer up my lads, says farmer Bull.

Printer: Bebbington, John Oliver

Date printed: 1848

Thumbnail for 'World on credit'

(30) World on credit [ID: 74892067]

First line reads: Come all you brisk and jovial blades. In one column with a woodcut above the title.

Printer: Croshaw, C.

Date printed: 1825

Thumbnail for 'New song for the times'

(31) New song for the times [ID: 74892106]

" ... the union houses must come down and railroads go to pot". '1858' is written in pencil beneath the imprint. First line reads: Come all you English poor folks. In two columns.

Printer: A. Ryle and Co.

Date printed: 1858

Thumbnail for 'Essex and victory'

(32) Essex and victory [ID: 74892145]

The two ballads refer to the parliamentary elections of 1847. 'The election race at Maldon' mentions the candidates Waddington, Lennard and Dick - they all competed in the 1847 election, Dick unsuccessfully.

Author: Morgan, John

Date printed: 1847

Thumbnail for 'Interesting and amusing song and dialogue which took place a few days ago in a well-known barber's shop'

(33) Interesting and amusing song and dialogue which took place a few days ago in a well-known barber's shop [ID: 74892148]

" ... respecting proceedings in the 19th century". First line reads: Come all you gallant farmers of every degree. In two columns with an illustration above the first. In prose and verse.

Printer: Birt, Thomas, fl. 1824-1841

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Parliament in 1856'

(34) Parliament in 1856 [ID: 74892202]

First line reads: Come all you good people young and old. In two columns.

Printer: Dever, W., ballad publisher

Date printed: 1856

Thumbnail for 'Sir C Napier for Southwark'

(35) Sir C Napier for Southwark [ID: 74892241]

Charles Napier stood and was elected to parliament in both the 1857 and 1859 parliamentry elections. He was elected unopposed in 1855.

Date printed: 1857