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Temperance & various vices

' Temperance & various vices ' contains the following 50 items:

Thumbnail for 'Satyr upon musty-snuff'

Satyr upon musty-snuff [ID: 85449148]

First line reads: To all nice beauxs, and nicer ladies, who. In one column. With some manuscript amendments in ink to the text.

Date printed: 1707

Thumbnail for 'English padlock unlock’d'

English padlock unlock’d [ID: 85449154]

First line reads: The Spanish Dons, as authors tell us. In one column. An imitation of Matthew Prior's 'An English padlock', London, 1705.

Date printed: 1705

Thumbnail for 'Extraordinary life and death of Mary Anne Pierce'

(1) Extraordinary life and death of Mary Anne Pierce [ID: 74891200]

" ... alias Lady Barrymore, who was for some years the dashing mistress of Lord Barrymore; afterwards she became upon the town, where her exploits in flooring beadles, Charlies &c are well known. She was the terror of police-officers and publicans. Had been 150 times at Bow-street, and confiined in every Gaol in London." In four columns with a woodcut beneath the title. The first line of text reads: This unfortunate woman, who, for many/ years past had been the terror of beadles/ watchmen, publicans, & police-officers. The first line of the ballad reads: AH! who is she whose haggard/ eye.

Printer: Catnach, John, 1769-1813

Date printed: 1832

Thumbnail for 'Lines by a reformed drunkard'

(2) Lines by a reformed drunkard [ID: 74891269]

" ... writing for the benefit of his fellow-men". First line reads: All you that have money, and you that have none. In two columns.

Printer: Henson, G., printer in Northampton

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Sunday Beer Bill is repealed'

(3) Sunday Beer Bill is repealed [ID: 74891407]

The ballad concerns the repealing of the Sunday Beer Bill in August 1855. First line reads: Arouse lads, arouse! bid adieu to the/ pump. In two columns with an illustration above the first and another beneath the second.

Printer: A. Ryle and Co.

Date printed: 1855

Thumbnail for 'Lish young buy-a-broom'

(4) Lish young buy-a-broom [ID: 74891536]

Two ballads. The lish young buy-a-broom - first line reads: As I was travelling in the south country. The bonnie lassie's answer - first line reads: Farewell to Glasgow.

Printer: Harkness, John, b. 1814

Probable date printed: 1840-1866

Thumbnail for 'Lish young buy-a-broom'

(5) Lish young buy-a-broom [ID: 74891539]

Two ballads. The lish young buy-a-broom - first line reads: As I was travelling in the north country. [The bonnie] lassie's answer - first line reads: Farewell to Glasgow.

Printer: Harkness, John, b. 1814

Probable date printed: 1840-1866

Thumbnail for 'New song called the publican's lament'

(6) New song called the publican's lament [ID: 74891563]

First line reads: As I was walking up Pimlico way. In one column with a woodcut above the title.

Printer: Brereton, P., printer in Dublin

Date printed: 1867

Thumbnail for 'Word of advice'

(7) Word of advice [ID: 74892001]

First line reads: Come all sporting husbands, wherever you be. In one column.

Printer: Birt, Thomas, fl. 1824-1841

Date printed: 1828

Thumbnail for 'New song in praise of temperance and Father Hudson'

(8) New song in praise of temperance and Father Hudson [ID: 74892190]

First line reads: Come all you good people I call your/ attention. In two columns with a woodcut above the first.

Printer: Hodges, E., printer (from Pitts')

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Swiss maid'

(9) Swiss maid [ID: 74892430]

Four ballads. The Swiss maid - first line reads: Come haste thee, come hast [sic] thee, my bonny Swiss/ maid. Rise gentle moon - first line reads: Day has gone down on the Baltic's broad billow. Meet me by moon-light - first line reads: Meet me by moonlight alone. Human mortality - first line reads: Tobacco's but an Indian weed.

Printer: Pitts, John, 1765-1844

Probable date printed: 1820-1844

Thumbnail for 'Come landlord fill a flowing bowl'

(10) Come landlord fill a flowing bowl [ID: 74892442]

Three ballads. Come landlord fill a flowing bowl - first line reads: Come landlord fill a flowing bowl. The buffalo - first line reads: Come all you young fellows that have a mi[nd t]o/ range. The fire king - first line reads: God people now pray list awhile. The fire king - Tune: - The bantam cock.

Printer: Pitts, John, 1765-1844

Probable date printed: 1820-1844

Thumbnail for 'T Whitaker's farewell to drunkenness'

(11) T Whitaker's farewell to drunkenness [ID: 74892604]

Two ballads. T. Whitaker's farewell to drunkenness - first line reads: Farewell landlords, farewell Jerry. The drunkard's catechism - first line reads: Question. - What is your name? Answer. Sot.

Printer: Walker, George, printer at North Shields

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Father Mathew, and the pledge'

(12) Father Mathew, and the pledge [ID: 74892652]

Mathew made a successful visit to Scotland in 1842, and although he had been invited to England as early as 1840 did not take up the offer of a major crusade there until the summer of 1843. First line reads: Father Mathews is come to town.

Date printed: 1843

Thumbnail for 'Private still'

(13) Private still [ID: 74892670]

Two ballads. The private still - first line reads: An Exciseman once in Dublin at the time/ that I was there. As the old cock crows the young ones' learn - first line reads: The sayings of the sages are themes on which/ I rhyme.

Date printed: 1860

Thumbnail for 'Private still'

(14) Private still [ID: 74892673]

Two ballads. The private still - first line reads: An Exciseman once in Dublfn [sic] at the time that/ I was there. The lamentations of Patrick Brady or The heroes of '98 - first line reads: Ye true born heroes I hope you will now len/ an ear.

Date printed: 1860

Thumbnail for 'Semele'

(15) Semele [ID: 74892682]

First line reads: Extinguish the candles, give Phoebus fair play. In one column with a woodcut above the title.

Date printed: 1810

Thumbnail for 'Water drinker'

(16) Water drinker [ID: 74892709]

Three ballads. The water drinker - first line reads: Drink! drink! drink! Sleep gentle lady - first line reads: Sleep gentle lady, the flowers are closing. The Irish emigrant - first line reads: I'm sitting on the stile, Mary.

Printer: Walker, George, 1758-1835

Date printed: 1835

Thumbnail for 'Land, land'

(17) Land, land [ID: 74892835]

Two ballads. Land! Land - first line reads: The dangers of the deep are past. We wo'nt go home till morning - first line reads: Brave boys, let's all be jolly!

Printer: Walker, George, 1758-1835

Date printed: 1830

Thumbnail for 'Down among the dead men'

(18) Down among the dead men [ID: 74893021]

Down among the dead men - first line reads: Here's a health to the queen and a lasting peace. The Englishman - first line reads: There's a land that bears a well known name.

Printer: William M'Call (Firm)

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Down among the dead men'

(19) Down among the dead men [ID: 74893024]

Down among the dead men - first line reads: Here's a health to the Queen and a lasting peace. Old Dan Tucker - first line reads: I came across de ocean wide.

Printer: Walker, George, 1758-1835

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Bacchus & time'

(20) Bacchus & time [ID: 74893132]

Two ballads. Bacchus & time - first line reads: Gay Bacchus one evening inviting his friends. Heigho! says Thimble - first line reads: Thimble's scolding wife lay dead. Bacchus & time - Air: To Anacreon in heaven. (Captain Morris.). Heigho! says Thimble - Air: Heigho! says Rowley. (G. Colman.).

Printer: Walker, George, printer at North Shields

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Tee-total society leaders'

(21) Tee-total society leaders [ID: 74893201]

First line reads: Good friends I have penned a few lines. In two columns. '[176]' is printed at the foot of the second column. Tune: - The dandy fiddler.

Date printed: 1835

Thumbnail for 'Starve away and no beer!'

(22) Starve away and no beer! [ID: 74893510]

First line reads: I wish you all a happy New year. In two columns.

Printer: Birt, Thomas, fl. 1824-1841

Date printed: 1840

Thumbnail for 'Sunday water-party'

(23) Sunday water-party [ID: 74893567]

" ... with some account of the club at the Oak - of the trip to Richmond, and the melancholy disaster which befel them on their return home, whereby the whole party were drowned". First line reads: In a village near town, on the banks of the Thames. In three columns with a woodcut within the title. Price one penny.

Printer: Applegath, Augustus, d. 1871

Probable date printed: 1822-1826

Thumbnail for 'Drunkard reclaimed'

(24) Drunkard reclaimed [ID: 74893651]

The drunkard reclaimed - first line reads: In taking of my walks one fine sumer morn. The dying child - first line reads: Oh, what is it that strains my frame.

Date printed: 1860

Thumbnail for 'Rakish young fellow'

(25) Rakish young fellow [ID: 74893711]

The rakish young fellow - first line reads: I once was a rakish young fellow. The gipsey's tent - first line reads: Our fire on the turf, and tent 'neath the hill. In two columns with an illustration above each.

Printer: William M'Call (Firm)

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Gin-shop; or, A peep into a prison'

(26) Gin-shop; or, A peep into a prison [ID: 74894266]

'[Enter'd at Stationers Hall]' at the foot of the third column. In three columns with a woodcut above the second. First line reads: Look through the land from North/ to South. Signed at end: Z., i.e. Hannah More. Price an half-penny, or 2s. 3d. per 10.

Author: More, Hannah, 1745-1833

Date printed: 1795

Thumbnail for 'New song on the new Drunken Act'

(27) New song on the new Drunken Act [ID: 74894497]

First line reads: My jovial friend draw near likewise each jolly toper. In one column with an illustration above the title.

Printer: Brereton, P., printer in Dublin

Date printed: 1870

Thumbnail for 'Brandy and ale'

(28) Brandy and ale [ID: 74894554]

First line reads: My name it is Daffy Down Day. In one column.

Printer: Carrall, M. W.

Probable date printed: 1822-1834

Thumbnail for 'Publican and sinner'

(29) Publican and sinner [ID: 74894674]

First line reads: Oh dear, what a row and a riot! In two columns with an illustration above the first. This ballad is concerned with 'Godfrey's Cordial' which was a patent medicine given to children troubled with colic. It appears from the text that it may also have been used by some doctors to drug and molest victims. It consisted of sassafras, opium in some form, brandy or rectified spirit, caraway seed, and treacle. There are seven or eight different preparations. Named after Thomas Godfrey of Hunsdon.

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Father Pat'

(30) Father Pat [ID: 74895106]

Father Pat - first line reads: Old Father Pat was blithe and free. Ill omens - first line reads: When daylight was yet sleeping under the billow. Ill omens - tune: Kitty of Cole.

Printer: Walker, George, printer at North Shields

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Friend and bottle'

(31) Friend and bottle [ID: 74895973]

First line reads: Since the first dawn of reason that beam'd/ on my mind. In one column with a woodcut above the title.

Printer: Jennings, J., printer in Fleet Street, London

Probable date printed: 1802-1809

Thumbnail for 'Spree'

(33) Spree [ID: 74896063]

The spree - first line reads: The spree, the spree, the jovial spree. A tee-total song - first line reads: Let ilka drouthie neighbour, that likes a wee drap.

Printer: Walker, George, printer at North Shields

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Allowed to be drunk on the premsises [sic]'

(34) Allowed to be drunk on the premsises [sic] [ID: 74896087]

Allowed to be drunk on the premsises - first line reads: Strange laws will oft come into force. Allowed to be drunk on the premsises - air: The chummy's society. Banks of the blue Moselle - first line reads: When the glow-worm gilds the elfin bower. In two columns. Two ballads.

Printer: Walker, George, 1758-1835

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Storming the gaming houses, or The West-end in an uproar'

(35) Storming the gaming houses, or The West-end in an uproar [ID: 74896093]

'1850' is written in pencil beneath the imprint. First line reads: Such a game there was on tuesday last. In two columns with an illustration above the first.

Printer: Paul and Co.

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Sup of good whisky'

(36) Sup of good whisky [ID: 74896132]

A sup of good whisky - first line reads: A sup of good whiskey will make you glad. Of all the arts the wind can blow - first line reads: Of all the arts the wind can blow.

Author: Burns, Robert, 1759-1796

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Carpenter; or, The danger of evil company'

(37) Carpenter; or, The danger of evil company [ID: 74896336]

'[Enter'd at Stationers Hall.]' at the foot of the third column. In three columns with a woodcut above the second. First line reads: There was a young West-country/ man. In this edition the centre of the frame above the title is free of any wording and in the imprint the second line is "By J. Marshall,". Signed: Z., i.e. Hannah More. Price an half-penny, or 2s. 3d. per 100, 1s. 3d. for 50, 9d. for 25.

Author: More, Hannah, 1745-1833

Date printed: 1795

Thumbnail for 'New songs'

(38) New songs [ID: 74896474]

The last slavish drunkard - first line reads: 'Tis the last slavish drunkard left drinking alone. The last slavish drunkard - tune: The last rose of summer. New way to pay old debts - tune: Derry down. In two columns with an illustration above each and another at the foot of the first. Two ballads.

Printer: Walker, George, printer at North Shields

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Teetotalers procession'

(40) Teetotalers procession [ID: 74896843]

" ... on Whit-Monay, June 1". First line reads: What lots of fun how they do run. In two columns.

Printer: Birt, Thomas, fl. 1824-1841

Date printed: 1840

Thumbnail for 'Parson Gibson'

(41) Parson Gibson [ID: 74896936]

Note at the foot of the first ballad mentions two reports in "The Times" dated December 19th and 24th, 1853. Parson Gibson - first line reads: When first I saw old Gibson. Parson Gibson - air: The low-back'd car. The parson grocer - first line reads: Come friends, and listen unto me. The parson grocer - air: Rosa May. In two columns.

Printer: J. Noakes and T. Styles (Firm)

Date printed: 1854

Thumbnail for 'Wild rover'

(42) Wild rover [ID: 74896972]

The wild rover - first line reads: When I was a young man I roved up and down. Betsey Baker - first line reads: From noise and bustle far away.

Printer: Walker, George, printer at North Shields

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'John Bull's petition for cheap beer'

(43) John Bull's petition for cheap beer [ID: 74897251]

" ... Containing tap room topics, or advice to brewers". First line reads: Ye brewers a' baith far and near. In two columns.

Author: John Bull (Symbolic character)

Date printed: 1820

Thumbnail for 'Dialogue between drunken Bill and tea-total Jack'

(44) Dialogue between drunken Bill and tea-total Jack [ID: 74897353]

First line reads: Ye thirsty souls, lay down your bowls. Prose passage in two columns. "The song" in three columns. '[34]' is printed beneath the second column of "The song". In prose and verse.

Printer: Walker, George, 1758-1835

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Gamblers in a hobbel'

(45) Gamblers in a hobbel [ID: 74897458]

'1840' is written in pencil at the foot of the second column. First line reads: You comical coves I pray draw near. In two columns with a woodcut above the first.

Date printed: 1840

Thumbnail for 'Life of a drunkard'

(46) Life of a drunkard [ID: 74897470]

Life of a drunkard - first line reads: You drunkards all on you I call, wherever you may be. Teetotal boy - first line reads: You drunkards all, both great & small, to these few lines attend.

Printer: Pearson, T., printer in Manchester, fl. 1870-1871

Date printed: 1865

Thumbnail for 'Drinking is a foolish thing'

(47) Drinking is a foolish thing [ID: 74897473]

First line reads: You drunkards I pray you attend. In two columns with an illustration above the first.

Printer: Henson, G., printer in Northampton

Date printed: 1845

Thumbnail for 'Cure for a drunken husband'

(48) Cure for a drunken husband [ID: 74897734]

The London Lock Hospital was the first venereal disease clinic, being the most famous and first of the Lock Hospitals opening on January 31st 1747. A cure for a drunken husband - first line reads: You married women draw near awhile. The unfortunate lad - first line reads: As I was a walking down by the Lock Hospital. In two columns with an illustration above each. Two ballads.

Publisher: Carrots, John

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Sacred to the memory of Father Matthews'

(49) Sacred to the memory of Father Matthews [ID: 74897866]

" ... the great teetotalist". Mathew was most active in Ireland around this time (1845). Sacred to the memory of Father Matthews - first line reads: You sons of Hibernia pray give attention. Good bye sweetheart coodbye [sic] - first line reads: The bright stars fade the morn is breaking. In two columns with two illustrations beneath the title.

Printer: Hodges, E., printer (from Pitts')

Date printed: 1845

Thumbnail for 'Grand procession'

(50) Grand procession [ID: 74897956]

The text mentions the procession taking place in 'the year 39'. First line reads: You true sons of Erin, that's sober and steady. In two columns with an illustration.

Author: Mundy, Edward

Date printed: 1839