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Wars

Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815)

' Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815) ' contains the following 62 items:

Thumbnail for 'Britons unconquerable'

(1) Britons unconquerable [ID: 74891182]

" ... a new song". First line reads: Afraid of the French! and afraid of invasion! In one column. One halfpenny each, or 50 for 1s. 6d. or 2s. 6d. per hundred for distribution.

Printer: Ginger, J.

Date printed: 1803

Thumbnail for 'Wellington and glory for ever'

(2) Wellington and glory for ever [ID: 74891329]

First line reads: Amid that race of heroes bold. In one column.

Printer: Pigott, Charles, printer

Date printed: 1812

Thumbnail for 'Verses on the Highland soldiers who fell at Quartre Bras and Waterloo'

(3) Verses on the Highland soldiers who fell at Quartre Bras and Waterloo [ID: 74891335]

First line reads: Among those hills which rise around. In one column. Signed at foot 'J. P.'.

Date printed: 1815

Thumbnail for 'Plains of Waterloo'

(4) Plains of Waterloo [ID: 74891341]

First line reads: The ancient sons of glory were all great men, they say. In two columns with a woodcut above the first.

Printer: A. Ryle and Co.

Date printed: 1846-1859

Thumbnail for 'Battle of Waterloo'

(5) Battle of Waterloo [ID: 74891344]

First line reads: The ancient sons of glory were all great men, they say. In two columns with a woodcut above the first.

Printer: William M'Call (Firm)

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'British flag maintained'

(6) British flag maintained [ID: 74891353]

This ballad concerns the proposed invasion of England. First line reads: And shall we then renounce the Flag? In one column. Price: Threepence per dozen.

Date printed: 1803

Thumbnail for 'Victory at Trafalgar'

(7) Victory at Trafalgar [ID: 74891365]

First line reads: Arise, arise, brave Britains. In one column with a woodcut above the title.

Printer: Angus, Margaret, d. 1821

Date printed: 1805

Thumbnail for 'Relish for old Nick'

(8) Relish for old Nick [ID: 74891398]

" ... Song on the threatened invasion". The ballad concerns the threatened invasion of England by Napoleon. First line reads: Arm Neighbours at length. In one column. Tune: - Vicar and Moses.

Printer: Crowder, J. (John), d. 1830

Printer: Hemsted, Edmund

Date printed: 1803

Thumbnail for 'Grand conversation on Nelson'

(9) Grand conversation on Nelson [ID: 74891599]

The ballad concerns the construction of Trafalgar Square in London to celebrate Nelson's victory at the battle of Trafalgar. First line reads: As some heroes bold, I will unfold, toge-/ther they were conversing.

Date printed: 1845

Thumbnail for 'Notable dialogue which passed yesterday between the Duke of N-------'s great dog (Bounce) and the famous French dog, (Le chiene savant)'

(10) Notable dialogue which passed yesterday between the Duke of N-------'s great dog (Bounce) and the famous French dog, (Le chiene savant) [ID: 74891815]

" ... who is shewn to the gantry at Chairing-Cross,) [sic] as he was coming in at the gate to be shewn to the D----ss". First line reads: Bow, Wow, Oh curse my collar. A satirical conversation between a French and English dog (possibly the dog of Cuthbert Collingwood). In the title 'Northumberland's' is written in manuscript is written in manuscript in place of the blanks.

Date printed: 1805

Thumbnail for 'Britons, to arms'

(11) Britons, to arms [ID: 74891827]

First line reads: Britons, to Arms! of Apathy beware. In one column. Price one penny or 6s. the hundred and 9d. per dozen.

Author: Fitzgerald, William Thomas, 1759?-1829

Date printed: 1803

Thumbnail for 'Britons, to arms'

(12) Britons, to arms [ID: 74891830]

First line reads: Britons, to Arms! of Apathy beware. In two columns. At foot of text: July 14, 1803. W. T. F-G.

Author: Fitzgerald, William Thomas, 1759?-1829

Printer: J. Nichols and Son

Date printed: 1803

Thumbnail for 'Nelson's monument'

(13) Nelson's monument [ID: 74891860]

Nelson's monument - first line reads: Britons long expected great news from our fleet. The blue bells of Scotland - first line reads: Oh, where, and oh where is my High-/land laddie gone?

Printer: Keys, Elias

Date printed: 1840-1845

Thumbnail for 'Lines, on the brilliant victory over the combined fleets of France and Spain'

(14) Lines, on the brilliant victory over the combined fleets of France and Spain [ID: 74891863]

" ... October the 21st, 1805". First line reads: Britons, rejoice! - our bulwarks once again. In one column with an illustration above the title. At foot of text: Manchester, Nov. 8, 1805. G. W.

Date printed: 1805

Thumbnail for 'Young Napoleon'

(15) Young Napoleon [ID: 74891884]

First line reads: By the side of the green ocean. In one column with a woodcut above the title.

Probable date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Britons to arms'

(16) Britons to arms [ID: 74891926]

First line reads: Cheerly my hearts of courage true, the hour's at hand to try your worth. In two columns with an engraved illustration above the title and with musical notation.

Publisher: Wallis, J. (John), d. 1818

Date printed: 1803

Thumbnail for 'King or a consul?'

(17) King or a consul? [ID: 74892004]

" ... a new song to the tune of Derry Down". The ballad concerns the proposed invasion of England by French forces in 1803. First line reads: Come all ye brave Englishmen, list' to my story. In two columns with a woodcut above the title. Anonymous: By Hannah Moore.

Printer: Hazard, Samuel, d. 1806

Author: More, Hannah, 1745-1833

Date printed: 1803

Thumbnail for 'King or a consul?'

(18) King or a consul? [ID: 74892007]

" ... a new song to the tune of Derry Down". The ballad concerns the proposed invasion of England by French forces in 1803. First line reads: Come all ye brave Englishmen, list' to my story. In two columns with a woodcut above the title. Anonymous: By Hannah Moore.

Printer: Hazard, Samuel, d. 1806

Author: More, Hannah, 1745-1833

Date printed: 1803

Thumbnail for 'King or a consul?'

(19) King or a consul? [ID: 74892010]

" ... a new song to the tune of Derry Down". The ballad concerns the proposed invasion of England by French forces in 1803. First line reads: Come all ye brave Englishmen, list' to my story. In two columns with a woodcut above the title. Anonymous: By Hannah Moore. Beneath the imprint: Sold also by Messrs. Rivingtons, St. Paul’s Church-yard; Hatchard, Piccadilly, London; James, Wine-street, Bristol; and by all the booksellers in the United Kingdom. Price one half-penny, or 3s. 6d. per hundred. This is a different edition from the items placed at Crawford.EB.1760 and Crawford.EB.1761. The illustration and decorative borders are different from Crawford.EB.1760 and the decorative rule at the foot of the first column is different from Crawford.EB.1761. The texts are identical .

Printer: Hazard, Samuel, d. 1806

Author: More, Hannah, 1745-1833

Date printed: 1803

Thumbnail for 'Battle of Trafalgar'

(20) Battle of Trafalgar [ID: 74892079]

First line reads: Come all you British heroes come listen to my song. In one column.

Printer: Jennings, J., printer in Fleet Street, London

Date printed: 1805

Thumbnail for 'Battle of Trafalgar'

(21) Battle of Trafalgar [ID: 74892082]

The battle of Trafalgar - first line reads: Come all you British heroes come listen to my song. The rose in June - first line reads: Some idly throughout spend their time.

Printer: Walker, George, 1758-1835

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Battle of Trafalgar'

(22) Battle of Trafalgar [ID: 74892085]

First line reads: Come all you British sailors bold. In one column with a woodcut above the title.

Printer: M. Angus & Son

Date printed: 1805

Thumbnail for 'Loss of one hero on the plains of Waterloo'

(23) Loss of one hero on the plains of Waterloo [ID: 74892244]

The loss of one hero on the plains of Waterloo - first line reads: Come all you lovers that are true and constan [sic] . Deeds of Napoleon - first line reads: You heroes of the day, who are lively, brave, and gay. Deeds of Napoleon - Tune: - The mouth of the Nile.

Printer: William M'Call (Firm)

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'New song on the triumphant entry of the allies into Paris'

(24) New song on the triumphant entry of the allies into Paris [ID: 74892382]

" ... being the sure prelude to universal peace!!!" The ballad possibly concerns the entry of the allies in 1814 rather than the subsequent entry after the battle of Waterloo in 1815. First line reads: Come Britons attend to the theme of my song. Tune: - Hearts of oak.

Printer: Jennings, J., printer in Fleet Street, London

Date printed: 1814

Thumbnail for 'Riot; or, half a loaf is better than no bread'

(25) Riot; or, half a loaf is better than no bread [ID: 74892529]

" ... in a dialogue between Jack Anvil and Tom Hod To the tune of "A cobler there was," &c". Anonymous: by Hannah More. The sheet is headed: "Cheap repository". First line reads: Come neighbours, no longer be patient and quiet. In two columns with a woodcut above the title.

Author: More, Hannah, 1745-1833

Printer: J. Evans & Son

Date printed: 1815

Thumbnail for 'Britons triumph or Bonapartes knell'

(26) Britons triumph or Bonapartes knell [ID: 74892559]

The ballad concerns the proposed invasion of England by French forces. First line reads: Come, with all thy slaves around thee. In one column.

Printer: Hamilton, A. (Alexander), printer in Piccadilly

Date printed: 1803

Thumbnail for 'Wellington's laurels'

(27) Wellington's laurels [ID: 74892886]

Two ballads. Wellington's laurels - first line reads: Huzza! my brave boys, for the glorious gazette. The battle of Vittoria - first line reads: Thrice happy land where WELLINGTON was born. The battle of Vittoria: By a young lady of Exeter. Price one penny.

Printer: Pitts, John, 1765-1844

Date printed: 1813

Thumbnail for 'Freedom or slavery'

(28) Freedom or slavery [ID: 74892973]

" ... a new song". Ballad on the proposed French invasion of England. First line reads: The haughty French, with malice fraught. In one column.

Printer: Crowder, J. (John), d. 1830

Printer: Hemsted, Edmund

Date printed: 1803

Thumbnail for 'White flag, or, Boney done over'

(29) White flag, or, Boney done over [ID: 74893072]

This ballad concerns the defeat of Napoleon, probably in 1814 before the battle of Waterloo, as the ballad mentions the crowning of Louis XVIII. First line reads: Great news, brother Britons, our joy freely share.

Printer: Pollock, J. K. (James Kelly), fl. 1815-1844

Date printed: 1814

Thumbnail for 'French, 'tis said'

(30) French, 'tis said [ID: 74893099]

Title from first line. Song, to the tune of Mother Casey. This ballads concerns Napoleon's proposed invasion of England. First line reads: The French, 'tis said. Beneath imprint: Nobleman, magistrates, and gentlemen, would do well by ordering a few dozen of the above tracts of their different booksellers, and causing them to be stuck up in the respective villages where they reside, and causing them to be stuck up in the respective villages where they reside, that the inhabitants may be convinced of the cruelty of the Corsican usurper.

Date printed: 1803

Thumbnail for 'Grand conversation on Napoleon'

(31) Grand conversation on Napoleon [ID: 74893435]

Date derived from Todd 'A directory of printers' (1972), from address in imprint and examination of text and style. The grand conversation on Napoleon - first line reads: It was over that wild beaten track a friend of bold Buonaparte. The brave old oak- first line reads: A song to the oak, the brave old oak.

Printer: Catnach, John, 1769-1813

Date printed: 1835

Thumbnail for 'Grand conversation of Napoleon'

(32) Grand conversation of Napoleon [ID: 74893438]

Two ballads. The grand conversation of Napoleon - first line reads: It was over that wild beaten track, a friend of bold Buonaparte. The opera box - first line reads: Miss Emily Chatter!

Printer: Walker, George, printer at North Shields

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Countryman's humourous description of the surrender of Buonaparte'

(33) Countryman's humourous description of the surrender of Buonaparte [ID: 74893513]

First line reads: Ize a lad, d'ye zee, that's just cum'd up to to/ town. In one column with a woodcut above the title.

Author: Pope, C.

Date printed: 1815

Thumbnail for 'Manchester dandy'

(34) Manchester dandy [ID: 74893729]

Wellesley (formerly Wesley), Arthur, first duke of Wellington (1769-1852) was in 1809 created Viscount Wellington, in February 1812 Earl of Wellington, in October 1812 Marquis of Wellington, and in 1814, Duke of Wellington - the title Marquis of Wellington is mentioned in the text. First line reads: I'se a poor simple clown, and just come from town.

Date printed: 1812-1814

Thumbnail for 'Sprightly Irishman'

(35) Sprightly Irishman [ID: 74893819]

First line reads: I am a weaver by my trade. In one column.

Printer: Pitts, John, 1765-1844

Date printed: 1820-1844

Thumbnail for 'Surrender of Buonaparte'

(36) Surrender of Buonaparte [ID: 74894236]

First line reads: Little Boney's done over at last. In one column with a woodcut above the title.

Author: Pope, C.

Date printed: 1815

Thumbnail for 'Battle of Waterloo'

(37) Battle of Waterloo [ID: 74894287]

The battle of Waterloo (1) - first line reads: Loud roar'd the dreadful battle. The battle of Waterloo (2) - first line reads: You sons of Britain list awhile. The battle of Waterloo (3) - first line reads: The ancient men of glory, they are all great men you say. Waterloo - first line reads: On the sixteenth day of June my boys in Flanders where/ we lay. In two columns with two woodcuts between them. The first is a battle scene with the figures and places lettered, with a key for identification. The second is of a heroic figure on horseback spearing a fallen Frenchman (Napoleon?).

Printer: Pitts, John, 1765-1844

Date printed: 1815

Thumbnail for 'Little Boney a-cockhorse'

(38) Little Boney a-cockhorse [ID: 74894653]

First line reads: Oh dear! little Boney's a coming. In one column with a woodcut above the title.

Printer: Pitts, John, 1765-1844

Date printed: 1802-1805

Thumbnail for 'What d'ye think of the new Spanish war'

(39) What d'ye think of the new Spanish war [ID: 74894995]

First line reads: And they're all for clipping clip, clip, clipping. In one column. Song concerning the Spanish fighting the French during the Peninsular War.

Printer: Bishop, William, fl. 1801-1836

Date printed: 1822

Thumbnail for 'Battle of Barossa'

(40) Battle of Barossa [ID: 74895382]

First line reads: On the 21st of February from Cadiz we set sail. In one column with a woodcut above the title.

Printer: Pitts, John, 1765-1844

Date printed: 1820-1844

Thumbnail for 'Shall Frenchmen rule o'er us'

(41) Shall Frenchmen rule o'er us [ID: 74895904]

Song to the tune of "Hearts of oak, &c. Title from first line. On the proposed invasion of England by Napoleon. First line reads: Shall Frenchmen rule o'er us? - King Edward said, NO! In one column.

Printer: Brettell, J. (John)

Date printed: 1803

Thumbnail for 'Berkshire farmer's thoughts on invasion'

(42) Berkshire farmer's thoughts on invasion [ID: 74896000]

" ... A song". The ballad concerns the threatened invasion of England by Napoleon. First line reads: So! Bonaparte's coming, as folks seem to say. In one column. Tune: - Liberty Hall.

Publisher: Wallis, J. (John), d. 1818

Date printed: 1803

Thumbnail for 'Buonaparte and Talleyrand'

(43) Buonaparte and Talleyrand [ID: 74896171]

" ... It is well known that Monsieur Talleyrand always objected to the invasion of England as a mad attempt, that must end in destruction of the invaders. Having been favoured with a note of a conversation between him and the chief consul on this subject, I have attempted, for the entertainment of my countrymen, to put it into rhyme / A. S." On the proposed invasion of England by Napoleon. First line reads: Buonaparte./ Talleyrand, what's the state of my great perparation. In two columns.

Date printed: 1803

Thumbnail for 'Battle of Waterloo'

(44) Battle of Waterloo [ID: 74896549]

First line reads: The trumpet sounds to victory with/ wars alarms. In one column.

Printer: Pitts, John, 1765-1844

Date printed: 1815

Thumbnail for 'Britannia's charge to the sons of freedom'

(45) Britannia's charge to the sons of freedom [ID: 74896642]

This ballad concerns Bonaparte's proposed invasion of England. First line reads: The tyrant for destruction eager burns. In one column.

Author: Rowe, Nicholas

Date printed: 1803

Thumbnail for 'Glorious news, Wellington in France and Bonaparte out of Germany'

(46) Glorious news, Wellington in France and Bonaparte out of Germany [ID: 74896828]

Glorious news, Wellington in France and Bonaparte out of Germany - first line reads: What famous times are coming on. Glorious news, Wellington in France and Bonaparte out of Germany - tune: Mrs. Casey. Boney in England - first line reads: Should Boney come here some Englishmen swear. In two columns with a woodcut above the second. Two ballads. Probably printed by Wood in Liverpool. See Crawford.EB.3403.

Date printed: 1814

Thumbnail for 'Glorious news, Wellington in France and Bonaparte out of Germany'

(47) Glorious news, Wellington in France and Bonaparte out of Germany [ID: 74896831]

Glorious news, Wellington in France and Bonaparte out of Germany - first line reads: What famous times are coming on. Glorious news, Wellington in France and Bonaparte out of Germany - tune: Mrs. Casey. Bonaparte's mistake at Germany - first line reads: Early last spring Buonaparte did begin. In two columns with a woodcut above the second. Two ballads.

Date printed: 1814

Thumbnail for 'Drummer-boy of Waterloo'

(48) Drummer-boy of Waterloo [ID: 74896900]

Drummer-boy of Waterloo - first line reads: When battle rouse'd each warlike band. Drummer-boy of Waterloo - air: Woodland Mary. Hail! Smiling morn! A very popular glee - first line reads: Hail! Smiling morn. The orphan child - first line reads: The night was dark as I did ramble. The orphan child - air: Young Henry of the raging main. Three ballads.

Printer: Walker, George, printer at North Shields

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Happy contrast between Nov 30 1792, and April 30 1814'

(49) Happy contrast between Nov 30 1792, and April 30 1814 [ID: 74897137]

To celebrate the defeat and exile of Napoleon to Elba in 1814, before the battle of Waterloo. Written in ink beneath the title: by George Sandeman London. The first lines of both songs are identical: Who would not be in love with Britain and Good order?

Author: Sandeman, George

Printer: D. Schaw and Son

Date printed: 1814

Thumbnail for 'Prophecy! Or, Bonaparte killed at last by his own troops'

(50) Prophecy! Or, Bonaparte killed at last by his own troops [ID: 74897257]

" ... A true story, just brought from Paris by a gentleman, who arrived in England only two days ago This story is founded on a dream of Bonaparte, which happened a week since, and has greatly agitated his mind, arising no doubt, from the inward workings of conscience. This dream he communicated to his faithful Mameluke, and some how or other it has transpired - perhaps by the secret intentions of providence, whose ways are inscrutable. The dream is here given in verse". This ballad concerns the proposed invasion of England by Bonaparte and his forces. First line reads: Ye Britons, to your country true. In two columns. 1d. each; 6d. per dozen; or, 3s. 6d. per 100.

Date printed: 1803