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Wars

Crimean War (1853-1856)

' Crimean War (1853-1856) ' contains the following 61 items:

Thumbnail for 'Russia and Turkish war'

(1) Russia and Turkish war [ID: 74891167]

First line reads: Adieu our boney friends adieu. In two columns with a woodcut above the first.

Printer: Paul, Charles, fl. ca. 1845-1848

Date printed: 1853-1856

Thumbnail for 'Sufferings of the British army in the camp at Sebastopol'

(2) Sufferings of the British army in the camp at Sebastopol [ID: 74891311]

First line reads: All you who live at home in ease, aud [sic] sleep/ on beds of down. In two columns with a woodcut beneath the title.

Printer: A. Ryle and Co.

Date printed: 1855

Thumbnail for 'Russian war'

(3) Russian war [ID: 74891371]

" ... Britain, France & victory". The text mentions the victory at Alma (1854) and that victory at Sebastopol had not yet been won. First line reads: Arise, arise, Britannia's sons. In two columns with an illustration above the first.

Printer: A. Ryle and Co.

Date printed: 1854

Thumbnail for 'England and France must conquer the Russians'

(4) England and France must conquer the Russians [ID: 74891392]

The ballad concerns the outbreak of the Crimean War. First line reads: Arise up Britannia devoid of alarms. In two columns with an illustration above the first.

Printer: Hodges, E., printer (from Pitts')

Date printed: 1854

Thumbnail for 'France and England must conquer the Russians'

(5) France and England must conquer the Russians [ID: 74891395]

The ballad concerns the outbreak of the Crimean War. First line reads: Arise up Britannia devoid of alarms. In two columns. Air: - The Campbells are coming.

Printer: A. Ryle and Co.

Date printed: 1854

Thumbnail for 'Give it to him Charley'

(6) Give it to him Charley [ID: 74891413]

This ballad concerns the involvement of Britain in the Crimean War in 1854. First line reads: Arouse, you British sons, arouse! In two columns with an illustration beneath the title. Air: - Royal Charlie.

Printer: A. Ryle and Co.

Date printed: 1854

Thumbnail for 'Russian bear'

(7) Russian bear [ID: 74891431]

The ballad concerns the outbreak of the Crimean War. First line reads: As a fair one of England was musing by the/ rolling sea. In one column. Tune: - Grand conversation under the rose.

Printer: A. Ryle and Co.

Date printed: 1853

Thumbnail for 'Irish soldier'

(8) Irish soldier [ID: 74891473]

The text mentions war against the Russians - undoubtedly the Crimean War. First line reads: As I roved out one evening in the spring time of the year. In one column with an illustration above the title.

Date printed: 1853-1856

Thumbnail for 'Victoria, Albert & Napier'

(9) Victoria, Albert & Napier [ID: 74891614]

The ballad concerns the Crimean war. First line reads: As Victoria and Albert together did stray. Tune: - Vilikins and his Dinah. In two columns with an illustration beneath the title.

Printer: A. Ryle and Co.

Date printed: 1854

Thumbnail for 'Europe and victory'

(10) Europe and victory [ID: 74891686]

First line reads: Attend ye Britons bold and brave. In two columns with a woodcut above the first. Air: - Billy O'Rouke [sic], Pop goes the weasel, etc.

Printer: Hodges, E., printer (from Pitts')

Date printed: 1855

Thumbnail for 'Capture & destruction of Sebastopol'

(11) Capture & destruction of Sebastopol [ID: 74891923]

Sebastopol was taken in 1855. First line reads: Cheer lads, cheer! the enemy is quaking. In two columns with an illustration beneath the title. Tune: - Cheer, boys, cheer.

Printer: A. Ryle and Co.

Date printed: 1855

Thumbnail for 'Emperor of Russia kicked the bucket'

(12) Emperor of Russia kicked the bucket [ID: 74891932]

First line reads: Cheer up Britannia and don't you be down-hearted. In two columns with a woodcut above the first.

Printer: Marks, John, printer in Brick Lane, London

Date printed: 1855

Thumbnail for 'Welcome home our gallant soldiers'

(13) Welcome home our gallant soldiers [ID: 74891938]

This ballad celebrates victory in the Crimean War in 1856. First line reads: Cheer up, cheer up, Britannia's sons. In two columns with an illustration and printer's ornaments beneath the title. Tune: - Brighton camp.

Printer: A. Ryle and Co.

Date printed: 1856

Thumbnail for 'Welcome home our gallant soldiers'

(14) Welcome home our gallant soldiers [ID: 74891941]

This ballad celebrates victory in the Crimean War in 1856. Welcome home our gallant soldiers - first line reads: Cheer up, cheer up, britannia's sons. What will you do love - first line reads: What will you do love when I am going.

Printer: Hodges, E., printer (from Pitts')

Date printed: 1856

Thumbnail for 'We have nicely licked the Russians'

(15) We have nicely licked the Russians [ID: 74891962]

This ballad celebrates victory in the Crimean War in 1856. First line reads: Cheer up old Britannia and listen awhile. In two columns with an illustration beneath the title.

Printer: A. Ryle and Co.

Date printed: 1856

Thumbnail for 'Briton's rejoice, the war is over'

(16) Briton's rejoice, the war is over [ID: 74891965]

This ballad celebrates victory in the Crimean War in 1856. First line reads: Cheer up you bold sons of Britannia. In two columns with an illustration beneath the title.

Printer: A. Ryle and Co.

Date printed: 1856

Thumbnail for 'Welcome France'

(17) Welcome France [ID: 74891968]

This ballad celebrates Napoleon's visit to Britain during the Crimean War in 1855. First line reads: Cheer up with a loud hurah.

Date printed: 1855

Thumbnail for 'Fall of Sebastopol'

(18) Fall of Sebastopol [ID: 74892127]

First line reads: Come all you gallant Britons bold. In two columns with an illustration beneath the title.

Printer: Hodges, E., printer (from Pitts')

Date printed: 1855

Thumbnail for 'Downfall of Sebastopol'

(19) Downfall of Sebastopol [ID: 74892130]

First line reads: Come all you gallant Britos [sic] bold. In two columns with an illustration beneath the title.

Printer: A. Ryle and Co.

Date printed: 1855

Thumbnail for 'Glorious victory over the Russians'

(20) Glorious victory over the Russians [ID: 74892133]

" ... With the taking of Alma & Sebastopol". First line reads: Come all you gallant Britons bold. In two columns with an illustration above the first. Air: - Helmet on his brow.

Printer: A. Ryle and Co.

Date printed: 1855

Thumbnail for 'Peace and victory'

(21) Peace and victory [ID: 74892154]

This ballad celebrates victory in the Crimean war. First line reads: Come all you gallant heroes. In two columns with an illustration above the first.

Printer: Dever, W., ballad publisher

Date printed: 1856

Thumbnail for 'Tis time we hunt the bear'

(22) Tis time we hunt the bear [ID: 74892157]

This ballad concerns the early parts of the Crimean war. First line reads: Come all you gallant huntsmen who love to hunt the game. In two columns with a woodcut beneath the title.

Printer: Paul and Co.

Date printed: 1854

Thumbnail for 'Gallant Cambridge jumping over Prince Albert'

(23) Gallant Cambridge jumping over Prince Albert [ID: 74892367]

The Duke of Cambridge was appointed as 'general commanding-in-chief' on 15 July 1856, the duke succeeded Lord Hardinge. First line reads: Come arouse up Britannia and/ banish all grief.

Date printed: 1856

Thumbnail for 'Death of the Russian Emperor'

(24) Death of the Russian Emperor [ID: 74892370]

First line reads: Come arouse up Britannia, no more droop your/ head. In two columns with a woodcut above the first.

Printer: Marks, John, printer in Brick Lane, London

Date printed: 1855

Thumbnail for 'Visit of the Emperor of the French'

(25) Visit of the Emperor of the French [ID: 74892742]

This ballad celebrates Napoleon III's visit to Britain during the Crimean War in 1855. Air: - The bailiffs are coming. First line reads: The Emperor and Empress are coming so keen.

Printer: A. Ryle and Co.

Date printed: 1855

Thumbnail for 'Emperor and Empress's visit to England'

(26) Emperor and Empress's visit to England [ID: 74892745]

This ballad celebrates Napoleon III's visit to Britain during the Crimean War in 1855. First line reads: The Emperor and Empress are coming so keen.

Date printed: 1855

Thumbnail for 'Entry of the guards into London'

(27) Entry of the guards into London [ID: 74892880]

This ballad celebrates victory in the Crimean War. First line reads: Huzza boys huzza this is a joyful meeting. In two columns with an illustration beneath the title.

Printer: Powell, John, printer in Whitechapel

Date printed: 1856

Thumbnail for 'Noble alliance or the lily, rose, shamrock and thistle'

(28) Noble alliance or the lily, rose, shamrock and thistle [ID: 74892928]

Two ballads. The first ballad concerns the outbreak of the Crimean War and celebrates the alliance with France. The noble alliance or The lily, rose, shamrock and thistle - first line reads: Hurrah for the noble alliance! The noble alliance or The lily, rose, shamrock and thistle - Tune: Red, white & Blue. Our soldiers and sailors or the Reds and Blues - first line reads: Our soldiers and our sailors.

Printer: Hodges, E., printer (from Pitts')

Date printed: 1854

Thumbnail for 'Dialogue between the three great powers about to go to war'

(29) Dialogue between the three great powers about to go to war [ID: 74892952]

This ballad concerns events prior to the outbreak of the Crimean war. First line reads: Hark! loud rumour of fierce bloody war. In one column with a woodcut above the title.

Date printed: 1854

Thumbnail for 'Russian bear'

(30) Russian bear [ID: 74892955]

This ballad concerns events prior to the outbreak of the Crimean war. First line reads: Hark the loud rumour of fierce bloody War. In one column with a woodcut above the title.

Date printed: 1854

Thumbnail for 'Peace for the land that we love'

(31) Peace for the land that we love [ID: 74893150]

This ballad celebrates victory in the Crimean War in 1856. First line reads: The glorious bells they are ringing. In two columns with an illustration beneath the title.

Printer: A. Ryle and Co.

Date printed: 1856

Thumbnail for 'New song on the great Russian war'

(32) New song on the great Russian war [ID: 74893267]

First line reads: Good people all of each degree. In two columns with an illustration beneath the title.

Printer: Tourle, Charles

Date printed: 1854

Thumbnail for 'In the days when I was hard up'

(33) In the days when I was hard up [ID: 74893657]

The second ballad - 'Up with the standard of England' possibly concerns the Crimean war. In the days when I was hard up - first line reads: In the days when I was hard up. Up with the standard of England - first line reads : Hark, where the Lion is roaring!

Date printed: 1855

Thumbnail for 'Chancellor of the exchequer's new song'

(34) Chancellor of the exchequer's new song [ID: 74893744]

" ... as sung with great applause by Mr Gladstone to John Bull, on opening his war budget for 1855". First line reads: I sing of the Russians. In two columns.

Date printed: 1855

Thumbnail for 'Nightingale in the camp'

(35) Nightingale in the camp [ID: 74894356]

First line reads: The men before Sebastopol! In two columns with a woodcut above the title.

Printer: Nicholson, J. (John), printer in Kirkcudbright

Date printed: 1855

Thumbnail for 'Dialogue between John Bull & the czar'

(36) Dialogue between John Bull & the czar [ID: 74894704]

First line reads: O did you not hear the news afar. In two columns with an illustration above the first.

Date printed: 1855

Thumbnail for 'Dialogue between John Bull and the czar'

(37) Dialogue between John Bull and the czar [ID: 74894707]

Two ballads. A dialogue between John Bull and the czar - first line reads: Oh, did you not hear the news afar. Minna's tomb - first line reads: Oh Minna Minna, then for ever. In two columns.

Date printed: 1855

Thumbnail for 'John Bull and the Russians'

(38) John Bull and the Russians [ID: 74894737]

" ... Tom Blunt". The first ballad concerns the outbreak of the Crimean War. John Bull and the Russians - first line reads: Oh! have you heard the news of late, about a/ mighty king so great. John Bull and the Russians - tune: King of the Cannibal islands. Tom Blunt - first line reads: Oh, don't you remember old Ned, Tom Blnnt [sic]. Tom Blunt - By Edward Simmons Thompson.

Printer: Hodges, E., printer (from Pitts')

Date printed: 1854

Thumbnail for 'John Bull & the Russians'

(39) John Bull & the Russians [ID: 74894740]

The ballad concerns the outbreak of the Crimean War. First line reads: O have you heard the news of late. In two columns with an illustration above the first.

Printer: A. Ryle and Co.

Date printed: 1854

Thumbnail for 'Great battle at Alma'

(40) Great battle at Alma [ID: 74894755]

First line reads: Oh, have you heard this glorious row. In two columns with an illustration above the first.

Printer: Marks, John, printer in Brick Lane, London

Date printed: 1854

Thumbnail for 'Flare up amongst the Lambeth guardians'

(41) Flare up amongst the Lambeth guardians [ID: 74894839]

The text mentions the battles of Alma, Balaklava and Inkerman. First line reads: Oh Lambeth is a funny place. In two columns with an illustration above the first.

Printer: Paul and Co.

Date printed: 1855

Thumbnail for 'Bold Napier'

(42) Bold Napier [ID: 74895094]

Only on 22 February 1854, when the Crimean War had become inevitable, did Graham appoint Napier to command a Baltic fleet. Bold Napier - first line reads: Old England calls her sons to arms. Bold Napier - tune: Low-back'd car. The sporting farmer - first line reads: You farmers all, both great and small. The sporting farmer - tune: Coronation.

Printer: Hodges, E., printer (from Pitts')

Date printed: 1854

Thumbnail for 'John Bull and his German Legion'

(43) John Bull and his German Legion [ID: 74895103]

On the raising of a German Legion to fight in the Crimean War. First line reads: Old Farmer Bull come wheel about. In two columns.

Printer: Marks, John, printer in Brick Lane, London

Date printed: 1855

Thumbnail for 'Russian war or John Bull's dream'

(44) Russian war or John Bull's dream [ID: 74895121]

Concerning the outbreak of the Crimean War. First line reads: Old John Bull the other day. Tune: Bow, woo, woo. In two columns.

Printer: Marks, John, printer in Brick Lane, London

Date printed: 1854

Thumbnail for 'Nightingale in the East'

(45) Nightingale in the East [ID: 74895133]

The Nightingale in the East - first line reads: On a dark lonely night on the Crimea's dread/ shore. The Nightingale in the East - tune: The cotta[ge] and water mil [sic]. Jimmie. A parody on "Minnie" - first line reads: When my spirits are high, if I've/ cash in my cly. Two ballads.

Printer: A. Ryle and Co.

Date printed: 1855

Thumbnail for 'Premier's lament'

(46) Premier's lament [ID: 74895340]

On the lead up to the Crimean war. First line reads: Now the Parliament men are going to meet. In two columns with an illustration above each.

Printer: Powell, printer in Drury Lane

Date printed: 1854

Thumbnail for 'English cabinet makers stuck in the mud'

(47) English cabinet makers stuck in the mud [ID: 74895358]

On the outbreak of the Crimean war. First line reads: Now there has been some glorious rigs. In two columns with an illustration above the first.

Printer: Paul, Charles, fl. ca. 1845-1848

Date printed: 1854

Thumbnail for 'Great battle of Inkermann [sic]'

(48) Great battle of Inkermann [sic] [ID: 74895622]

First line reads: Pay attention you sons of old England. In two columns with an illustration above the first.

Printer: A. Ryle and Co.

Date printed: 1854

Thumbnail for 'Glorious celebration of peace'

(49) Glorious celebration of peace [ID: 74895772]

On the conclusion of the Crimean War. First line reads: Rejoice, rejoice from shore to shore. In two columns with an illustration beneath the title. Tune: - Coronation.

Printer: A. Ryle and Co.

Date printed: 1856

Thumbnail for 'Success to the shamrock rose & thistle'

(50) Success to the shamrock rose & thistle [ID: 74895817]

This ballad can be dated after the Crimean War, the text mentions the battle at Alma and 'ironclads' these warships were not developed until ca. 1865. First line reads: Rumours of war are flying through the world. Tune: Union Jack. In two columns.

Date printed: 1870