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Royalty

' Royalty ' contains the following 136 items:

Thumbnail for 'On the Queens most glorious victories over the French king'

On the Queens most glorious victories over the French king [ID: 85446929]

3 leaves . "Two conjugate half-sheet poems, each printed on the recto, preceded by a dedication leaf 'To the Queen's most excellent Majesty, and to the Right Honourable the Lords Commissioners for the union of both kingdoms', signed 'John Fowler'. (Foxon) On the Queen's most glorious victories - first line reads: The Macedonian youth, whose mighty name. On the happy situation of the British Isle - first line reads: Bless'd British Isle, by heavens propitious hand.

Author: Fowler, John, 17th/18th cent.

Probable date printed: 1707

Thumbnail for 'Poem to Her Royal Highness'

Poem to Her Royal Highness [ID: 85447824]

" ... upon the birth of her daughter". First line reads: Madam!/ By all our thunder-thumping lies, by Jove. In one column. A Whig satire on the birth of a daughter to the Duchess of York. Signed: "A".

Publisher: Sweetman, J., publisher in London

Date printed: 1682

Thumbnail for 'Ecloga'

Ecloga [ID: 85449131]

" ... in qua faelicissima hujusce regni conditio sub regis nostri fortissimi, Gulielmi & Mariae, reginae imperio discribitur". First line reads: Dic mihi quid causae est, Lycida? Qui folus in agris. In one column. Londini, : Typis H. Hills., 1692.

Printer: Hills, Henry, d. 1713

Date printed: 1692

Thumbnail for 'Epilogue to the court, on the Queen's birth-day'

Epilogue to the court, on the Queen's birth-day [ID: 85449132]

First line reads: The rustick muse thus having chang'd the scene. In one column. Price 1d.

Author: Roger, the observator's country-man

Printer: Bragge, Benjamin

Date printed: 1705

Thumbnail for 'To King William'

To King William [ID: 85449137]

" ... Written in the year 1689. By the Honourable Mr. Lloyd, then Batchelor of Arts, and fellow of Pembroke-Hall in Cambridge". First line reads: When England was not safe in its own strength at home. In one column.

Author: Lloyd, Robert Lumley, 1665 or 6-1730

Printer: Baldwin, Ann, 1658-1713

Date printed: 1712

Thumbnail for 'Fable of the widow and her cat'

Fable of the widow and her cat [ID: 85449138]

Sometimes attributed to Jonathan Swift. First line reads: A widow kept a favourite cat. In one column. On Queen Anne and the Duke of Marlborough. A variant has "Price one peny" after the imprint.

Author: Swift, Jonathan, 1667-1745

Date printed: 1712

Thumbnail for 'Excellent new hymn'

Excellent new hymn [ID: 86225488]

" ... compos’d by the priests of the Order of St. Perkin, for the use of High-Church, upon their approaching day of humiliation, being the coronation-day of his truly Protestant Majesty King George". Place of publication from ESTC. the coronation of George I took place in 1714. First line reads: Oh! why dost thou forsake us thus? In one column. A mock-Jacobite lament.

Date printed: 1714

Thumbnail for 'Visit of the King of France to England'

(1) Visit of the King of France to England [ID: 74891152]

First line reads: Across the seas, oh! what a spree. Tune: When I was out a drinking. In two columns with a woodcut above the first.

Date printed: 1844

Thumbnail for 'I am off to Ireland'

(2) I am off to Ireland [ID: 74891218]

" ... so don't you cry for me". Queen Victoria's first official visit to Ireland. First line reads: Albert take your kiddies on your back. In two columns.

Date printed: 1849

Thumbnail for 'New song, on the cruel usage of the French Queen'

(3) New song, on the cruel usage of the French Queen [ID: 74891266]

The arrest and execution of Marie Antoinette. First line reads: All you that have compassion and feeling draw near. In one column with a woodcut beneath the title. J. Evans (Printer) at this address from 1792.

Printer: Evans, J.

Date printed: 1793

Thumbnail for 'Sketch of the present times'

(4) Sketch of the present times [ID: 74891275]

The text mentions the Princess Royal and "another little Prince that has lately come to view" - Prince Edward, later King Edward VII was born in 1841. First line reads: All you that is low spirited. Tune: - Cobbler & butcher.

Date printed: 1841

Thumbnail for 'Approaching coronation'

(5) Approaching coronation [ID: 74891293]

The coronation of Queen Victoria took place on 28th June 1838 just over a year after her accession on June 20, 1837. First line reads: All you that's fond of fun and sport. In two columns. At foot of text: John Morgan.

Author: Morgan, John

Publisher: Morgan, John

Date printed: 1838

Thumbnail for 'Pimlico Association'

(6) Pimlico Association [ID: 74891332]

" ... a copy of verses spoken by Mr. R. Palmer, at the celebration of the anniversary of her Majesty’s birth day, January 18th. 1799". First line reads: Amid these scenes of war that round us rise. In one column with a coat of arms above the title.

Author: Palmer, R.

Date printed: 1799

Thumbnail for 'Another present for old John Bull'

(7) Another present for old John Bull [ID: 74891356]

This ballad celebrates the birth of Prince Arthur (on 1st May 1850), 1st Duke of Connaught and Strathearn, 7th child of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. First line reads: Another prince has come to town. In two columns.

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Another present for old John Bull'

(8) Another present for old John Bull [ID: 74891359]

This ballad celebrates the birth of Prince Arthur (on 1st May 1850), 1st Duke of Connaught and Strathearn, 7th child of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. First line reads: Another prince has come to town. In two columns.

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Birth of a Prince of Wales'

(9) Birth of a Prince of Wales [ID: 74891404]

The ballad celebrates the birth of Edward, (later King Edward VII) first son of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. He was born November 9, 1841. First line reads: Arouse, arouse, with heart and voice. In two columns. Air: - King of the Canibal Islands.

Date printed: 1841

Thumbnail for 'Frenchmen are coming'

(10) Frenchmen are coming [ID: 74891410]

The ballad possibly concerns the crowning of Louis Napoleon Bonaparte as Emperor Napoleon III in 1852. First line reads: Arouse up Brittannia or soon we shall rue. In two columns.

Date printed: 1852

Thumbnail for 'Victoria the pride of England's roses'

(11) Victoria the pride of England's roses [ID: 74891434]

The ballad concerns the death of William IV and the accession to the throne of Queen Victoria in 1837. Victoria the pride of England's roses - first line reads: As a fair one was lamenting. The rose, shamrock, & thistle - first line reads: Down by yon chrystal fountain.

Date printed: 1837

Thumbnail for 'That licks me'

(12) That licks me [ID: 74891605]

" ... and licks us all". First line reads: As the rose and thistle was conversing. In two columns.

Probable date printed: 1833-1841

Thumbnail for 'Epitaph on Adelaide, Dowager Queen of England'

(13) Epitaph on Adelaide, Dowager Queen of England [ID: 74891608]

" ... born Aug 13 1792 and died at two o'clock Dec 2nd 1849". First line reads: As the shamrock, the rose and the thistle. Tune: - Tars of the blanche. In two columns with an illustration beneath the title.

Date printed: 1849

Thumbnail for 'Peep at the coronation'

(14) Peep at the coronation [ID: 74891629]

Possibly concerning the coronation of William IV in 1831. First line reads: At home in our village when we'd done our daily/ labour.

Date printed: 1831

Thumbnail for 'Queen's glorious speech'

(15) Queen's glorious speech [ID: 74891659]

Dated from internal evidence - the text mentions 'Vic. and Al.' Queen Victoria married Prince Albert in 1840. First line reads: Attend l o h [sic] grave and witty. In two columns with a woodcut above the first.

Date printed: 1840

Thumbnail for 'Ashes of Napoleon'

(16) Ashes of Napoleon [ID: 74891689]

The ashes of Napoleon were eventually returned to paris in May 1840. First line reads: Attend ye gallant heroes bold, unto these lines I will unfold.

Date printed: 1839-1840

Thumbnail for 'Royal nurses or, scandal defeated'

(17) Royal nurses or, scandal defeated [ID: 74891692]

This ballad concerns Mary Anne Brough, wet nurse to the Prince of Wales who was dismissed for drunkenness. She later went on to murder her six children. First line reads: Attend yon Esher ladies all.

Author: Morgan, John

Publisher: Morgan, John

Date printed: 1842

Thumbnail for 'Removal of Napoleon Buonaparte's ashes'

(18) Removal of Napoleon Buonaparte's ashes [ID: 74891698]

The ashes of Napoleon were eventually returned to paris in May 1840. First line reads: Attend, you gallant Britons bold.

Author: Morgan, John

Date printed: 1840

Thumbnail for 'Removal of Napoleon's ashes'

(19) Removal of Napoleon's ashes [ID: 74891701]

Three ballads. The ashes of Napoleon were eventually returned to paris in May 1840. Removal of Napoleon's ashes - first line reads: Attend you gallant Britons. The old mousquetaire - first line reads: 'Neath a vine cover'd porch sat an old musquetaire. Speak of a man - first line reads: Oh, speak of a man as you find him.

Author: Morgan, John

Date printed: 1840

Thumbnail for 'Here's a health to the Queen of England or, Britain's hopes'

(20) Here's a health to the Queen of England or, Britain's hopes [ID: 74891707]

This ballad celebrates the news of Queen Victoria's pregnancy - she was married in Feb. 1840 and had her first child, Princess Victoria "Vicky" of Great Britain (Princess Royal), in Nov. 1840. The ballad though, anticipates a male heir. First line reads: Attend you ladies, one and all.

Date printed: 1840

Thumbnail for 'Lines on the removal of the remains of Napoleon from St Helena'

(21) Lines on the removal of the remains of Napoleon from St Helena [ID: 74891716]

The ashes of Napoleon were eventually returned to Paris in May 1840. First line reads: Attention pay bothyoung [sic] and old, unto the lines I will unfold.

Date printed: 1840

Thumbnail for 'Napoleon on the Isle of St Helena'

(22) Napoleon on the Isle of St Helena [ID: 74891806]

Napoleon on the Isle of St. Helena - first line reads: Bony is gone from the wars of all fighting. A new song on the downfall of the chignons - first line reads: Good people all now pay attention while I unto you relate.

Date printed: 1840

Thumbnail for 'Young Napoleon'

(24) Young Napoleon [ID: 74891890]

Young Napoleon - first line reads: By the dangers of the ocean. The silly maid - first line reads: I'm fourteen summers old I trow. In two columns. '(179)' is printed at the foot of the second column, beneath the imprint. Two ballads.

Printer: Walker, George, printer at North Shields

Probable date printed: 1860

Thumbnail for 'Royal little dear's wants'

(25) Royal little dear's wants [ID: 74891995]

This ballad anticipates the marriage of Victoria the Princess Royal and Prince Friedrich Wilhelm of Prussia, the marriage took place on January 25, 1858.

Date printed: 1857

Thumbnail for 'Birth of the Prince of Wales'

(26) Birth of the Prince of Wales [ID: 74892046]

The ballad celebrates the birth of Edward, (later King Edward VII) first son of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. He was born November 9, 1841. First line reads: Come all you bold Briton [sic], and list for a while.

Date printed: 1841

Thumbnail for 'Queen's visit to the Sawney Islands'

(27) Queen's visit to the Sawney Islands [ID: 74892049]

'1857' is written in pencil beneath the imprint. First line reads: Come all you bold Britons & list for a while. In two columns with a coat of arms above the first.

Date printed: 1857

Thumbnail for 'Humours of the royal visit to Cambridge'

(28) Humours of the royal visit to Cambridge [ID: 74892178]

This ballad is a satire on Victoria and Albert's visit to Cambridge on 25-26 Oct. 1843 in order that Prince Albert might receive a doctorate from the University.

Date printed: 1843

Thumbnail for 'Princess's faerwell [sic] to England'

(29) Princess's faerwell [sic] to England [ID: 74892271]

The ballad celebrates the marriage of Victoria the Princess Royal and Prince Friedrich Wilhelm of Prussia, the marriage took place on January 25, 1858.

Date printed: 1858

Thumbnail for 'Royal visit to Gravesend'

(30) Royal visit to Gravesend [ID: 74892274]

The ballad celebrates the marriage of Victoria the Princess Royal and Prince Friedrich Wilhelm of Prussia, the marriage took place on January 25, 1858.

Date printed: 1858

Thumbnail for 'Regent and king'

(31) Regent and king [ID: 74892394]

This ballad is written in praise of George IV, King of Great Britain (Prince Regent at the time), possibly in the light of victory at Waterloo. First line reads: Come cheer up my lads we'll no longer repine.

Author: Percival, John

Printer: Swindells, A. (Alice)

Date printed: 1815

Thumbnail for 'Oh dear, I am going to be married'

(32) Oh dear, I am going to be married [ID: 74892400]

The ballad anticipates the marriage of Victoria the Princess Royal and Prince Friedrich Wilhelm of Prussia, the marriage took place on January 25, 1858.

Printer: A. Ryle and Co.

Date printed: 1858

Thumbnail for 'Newtimes'

(33) Newtimes [ID: 74892418]

The text mentions the Egyptian Hall and 'Victoria's little cheese - That weighs about nine thousand stone' - Queen Victoria was, in 1841, presented with the 'Great Pennard cheese' in the Egyptian Hall.

Date printed: 1841

Thumbnail for 'Royal christening'

(34) Royal christening [ID: 74892439]

This ballad anticipates the baptism of Princess Victoria, first child of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. The baptism took place on 10th Feb, 1841.

Date printed: 1841

Thumbnail for 'Royal marriage'

(35) Royal marriage [ID: 74892487]

This ballad concerns the marriage of Victoria the Princess Royal and Prince Friedrich Wilhelm of Prussia, the marriage took place on January 25, 1858.

Printer: Neesom, printer in Brick Lane, London

Date printed: 1858

Thumbnail for 'Social fellows'

(36) Social fellows [ID: 74892502]

First line reads: Come, push the bowl about, and never/ mind the score. In one column with a woodcut above the title.

Printer: Jennings, J., printer in Fleet Street, London

Probable date printed: 1802-1809

Thumbnail for 'Lines written on the royal visit of the Prince of Wales'

(37) Lines written on the royal visit of the Prince of Wales [ID: 74892658]

" ... huraw for Punchestown". First line reads: The fifteenth of April it was ra y [sic] grand. In one column with a woodcut above the title. Air: - Huraw for the king and his jackey [sic] so blue.

Author: Sadlier, Joseph, fl. 1861-1870

Date printed: 1868

Thumbnail for 'Death of Princess Charlotte'

(38) Death of Princess Charlotte [ID: 74892700]

First line reads: Fare thee well endearing treasure. Tune: - Crazy Jane.

Date printed: 1817

Thumbnail for 'Duke William and a young nobleman's ramble into the west country'

(39) Duke William and a young nobleman's ramble into the west country [ID: 74892712]

" ... where they were pressed, carry'd on board a tender, and brought to the gangway to be flogg'd". First line reads: Duke William and a nobleman, heroes of England's nation. In one column with a woodcut above the title. A slip-song - "Duke William and a nobleman, heroes of England's nation". - Duke William = Prince William Henry, later William IV.

Date printed: 1795

Thumbnail for 'Duke William's frolic'

(40) Duke William's frolic [ID: 74892715]

Duke William's frolic - first line reads: Duke William and a Nobleman, heroes of England's nation. A thumping Cork red - first line reads: Hail to the root that in Erin advances.

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Victoria Queen of England'

(42) Victoria Queen of England [ID: 74892868]

Victoria's coronation took place on June 28th 1838. First line reads: Did you hear the trumpet sound of fame. In two columns. Signed at foot of the second column: John Morgan.

Author: Morgan, John

Date printed: 1838

Thumbnail for 'Queen's visit to Blackwall'

(43) Queen's visit to Blackwall [ID: 74892892]

First line reads: The high and low the rich and poor. In two columns with a woodcut beneath the title. Tune: - Trotting horse.

Date printed: 1840

Thumbnail for 'French National Guards visit to London'

(44) French National Guards visit to London [ID: 74892907]

1850 is written in pencil beneath the imprint. First line reads: How charming does the ladies look. In two columns.

Date printed: 1850

Thumbnail for 'Have you seen the National Guards of France'

(45) Have you seen the National Guards of France [ID: 74892985]

1850 is written in pencil beneath the imprint. First line reads: Have you seen the National Guards of France? In two columns.

Date printed: 1850