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'Foreigners'

Sich a getting up stairs

(8) Sich a getting up stairs

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Sich a Getting up Stairs.

Kentuck one night a party met,
Who say dey going to have a treat ;
They came from Old-Town, short and tall,
To hire a dance at the Nigger Ball

                            CHORUS.

And sich a getting up stairs,
And a playing on the fiddle,
Sich a getting up stairs I neber did see.

Mister Brown he came in his Mackintosh,
His head all frizz'd like a pumpkin squash,
He smok'd cigars, the best Havan,
And a watch as large as a warming pan.
                            And sich a getting up stairs, &c.

Miss Rose came in her mistress clothes,
But how she got them nobody knows ;
And long before de ball did meet,
She was dancing Taglioni at de corner of de street.
                            And sich a getting up stairs, &c.

A little old man was riding by,
His horse was trying to kick a fly,
He lifted his leg towards the South,
And sent it bang into his own mouth.
                            And sich a getting up stairs, &c.

De watchman, sent to keep the peace,
Took de whole of de parties to de police,
In de morning how dey all did stare,
When dey found 'emselves before de mayor,
                            And sich a getting up stairs, &c.

Miss Sambinto was de first he call'd,
And wid his look she so appall'd,
Dat down she faint twice plump away,
And on de ground, poor gal, she lay,
                            And sich a getting up stairs, &c.

How now, say de mayor, what mean all dis,
When among de crowd spoke Mr. Bombis,
Dat lady woman is to be my wife,
So me shall blow you out of your life.
                            And sich a getting up stairs, &c.

O dam, says de mayor, is dat the rig,
He take off his head and throw away his wig,
Which makes de parties all declare,
Dey nebber go again before de mayor.
                            And sich a getting up stairs, &c.

        ENCORE VERSES

There came one night to dis fancy ball,
A bone squash captain, handsome and tall ;
He was a traveller of high degree,
And all his adventures he told to me.
                            And sich a getting up stairs, &c.

In a fight one day he was cut in two,
He went and got a pound of glue ;
He stuck himself togedder so right and tight,
When dry, he came back and finished de fight.
                            Oh, sich a getting up stairs, &c.

He went to sleep on a berry hot day,
De glue it melted all away ;
And when he woke he found, vid surprise,
Some thief had carried off both his thighs.
                            And sich a getting up stairs, &c.

Dis being de case, he saw no fun,
And having no legs he couldn't run,
So he shied a stone at de old thief's head,
And tho' seven miles off he kill'd him dead.
                            And sich a getting up stairs, &c.

A ball one day knock'd off his head,
De people all thought he was quite dead.
But he pick'd up his head and run away,
And nebber was heard of since dat day.
                            And sich a getting up stairs, &c.

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    The Highland Bride.

Away to the battle,—away, away,
Nor tarnish the glory by love's delay :
The man who shall shelter in danger's hour,
The noon of his manhood in beauty's bower,
Was never by blood to the North allied,
Nor e'er shall be blest with a Highland Bride.

Away to the battle, thro' death's dark cloud,
The sun of thy glory ere moon tide shroud,
Who would to his country a traitor prove,
Was never a man to be true in love,
Was never by blood to the North allied,
Nor e'er shall be blest with a Highland Bride.

Durham: Printed by George Walker, Jun.Sold by John
Livsey,
43 Hanover Street, Shudehill, Manchester.
                                        [279]

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