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Soldiers & sailors

Dick dock, or the lobster & crab

(40) Dick dock, or the lobster & crab

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DICK DOCK, OR THE LOBSTER & CRAB.

Dick Dock a tar at Greenwich moor'd,
One Day had got his beer on board,

When he a poor maim'd pensioner from Chelsea saw ;
And for to have his jeer and flout—

For the grog once in, the wit's soon out,
Cries,How good Master Lobster did you loſe your claw;
Was't that night in a drunken fray ?
Or t'other, when you ran away ?
But hold you Dick, the poor for has one foot in the grave,
For slander's wind too fast you fly,
Do you think it fun ? you swab you lie,
Misfortunes ever claim the pity of the brave

Old Hannibal in words as groſs,
For he like Dick had got his dose ,
So to have his bout at grambling took a spell ;
If I'm a lobster, Master Grab,
By the information on your nab,

In nine skimiſh or other they have crack'd your shell ;
And then how you hobbling go ,
On that jury-mast, your timber-toe
A nice one to find fault, with one foot in the grave ;

But halt ! Old Hannibal, halt ! halt !
Distreſs was never yet a fault,
Misfortunes ever claim the pity of the brave ,

If Hannibals' your name,d'ye see,
As sure as they Dick Dock call me,

As once it did fall out,I ow'd my life to you ;
Spilt from my house once when 'twas dark,
And nearly swallow'd by a shark ,

Who boldly plung'd in,sav'd me and pleas'd all the crew.
If that's the case then,cease your jeers,
When boarded by the same Monsieurs,

'You,like a true English tion,snatch'd me from the grave,
Crying, Cowards!do the Man no harm ;
Damme, don't you see he's lost his arm :

Misfortunes ever claim the pity of the brave .

Let's broach a can before we part,
A friendly one with all my heart,
And as we push the grog about, we'll cheerly sing ,

On land and sea may Britons fight ;
The Worlds example and delight,
And conquer every enemy of George our King :

Tis he who proves the hero's friend ,
His bounty waits us to our end ,
Tho' crippled and laid up,with one foot in the grave ;

Then,tars and soldiers never fear,
You shall not want compaſsion's tear,
Misfortunes ever claim the pity of the brave.

438
Publish'd Aug.6,1806, by LAURIE & WHITTLE, 53, Fleet Street, London .

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