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Crime & punishment

River Roe

(15) River Roe

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              THE RIVER ROE.

I went out one evening, all in the month
of June,
The primroses and daisies and. violets were in
bloom,
pied a lovely fair one, and her I did not
know,
I look her for an angel that was bathing in
the Roe.
Her teeth were like the ivory, her skin a lilly
white.
He cheeks as ted as roses> her eyes like
diamonds bright,
Her sirname I'll not tell, lest you might her
know
But her master's habitation is on the River
Roe.
I quickly ssepped up to her, and this to her
did say,
Are you a goddess or what brought you this
way,
She answered me right modestly, and said I
ana not so,
I'm but a servant maid that was bathing in
the Roe.
I said, my pretty fair maid if with me you'll
agree,
We'll join our hands in wedlock, and wedded
we will be,
My father he's a nobleman, the country wel.
does know,
And his dweliing lies conveniant to the River
Roe.
She quickly made me answer, and this to m
did say,
My mistress she is waiting, I have no time .
stay,
I'll meet you to-morrow and my mistreess
wont know
We've had some conversation on the River
Roe
They both shook hands and parted, from each
other did go,
In hopes to meet next morning along the River
Roe.
She dressed herself in private, away en she
did go,
Her true love he wa waiting along the River
Roe.
When she came up to him he this to her did
say,
I'm glad to meet you here my love upon this
very day,
I'm glad to meet you here, love, the way that
I will know
I you are going to wed with me, and dwell
beside the River Roe.
She modestly modestly made answer, and said
she was content,
I kissed and embraced her, and then away
both went
We were married next evening, as you, shal
shortly know,
She has servants to attend her, and well
the Roe.

            The Robber outwitted.

Come listen awhile and a story I will
Concerning a farmer in Yorkshire did dwell,
He had a youthful boy he hired as his man,
All for to do bis business, his name it was John
Fal de ral de ri.

It was early one morning he called to his man
John to his mastsr he instantly ran,
John, said his master, drive this cow to the
For she's in good order and her I can spare.

Then John drove the cow out of the bawn,
And off to the fair he straightway did run,
He did not go far when he met with three men
And he sold them the cow for five pound ten.

was into an alehouse they went for to drink,
They three men they paid him down in a chink
Oh, what shall I do with this money he did say
Oh, where will I put it, andlady, I pray?

In the lining of your coat I will sow it says she
For tear on the road that robb'd you might be
The robber in the room sat drinking his wine,
He said to himself this money shall be mine.

Then John took his leave and he started hon
The robber he followed him out of the room,
He soon overtool him all on the high way,—
I am glad of your company young man he did
say.

Now, said the robber, you had better ride,
How tar do you travel then, John he replied !
Three or four miles, as far as I Know,
He jumped up behind him and off they did go.

They rode till they came to a narrow lane,
Mow, said the robber, I tell you quite plain,
Deliver up your money without any strife,
Or this very moment I'll take away your life.

Here, then, said John, there's no time to dis-
pute,
He jumped off the horse without fear or doubt
From the lining of his coat he pulled the mo.
ney out,
And 'midst the green grass threw it all abou

The robber he alighted down from his horse,
But little thought that it was to his lost;
While gathering the money that was strew
on the grass,
John jumped to the saddle and rode off with
the horse.

Then one of the servants saw John comi
home,
And into his master he straightway did run
Oh, John, said his master, did yo make a
swop,
O   how did my cow turn into horse.

Oh, no, my dear master, the truth I'll unfolde
I  was stopt on the way by a highway man born
As he gathered the money that was strewn on
the grass,
To make you amends I brought home his horse,

When the taddle bags were opened, in them up
was rolled,
Five huadred bright guineas in silver and gold
A bright pair of pistols, the farmer did vow,
Saying, John, my dear fellow, you have wel

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