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Soldiers & sailors

Rake of Kildare

(9) Rake of Kildare

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         The Rake of Kildare.

As I roved thro'the town toview the pretty lass
The old maids with a frown peeped ta me thro
their glasses,
o Kildare town we will go down to view the
lasses pretty,
And the sailors also, which sets forth all it's
There'sCaptainCoraock of Cromwells Fort, a
very famous name, sir,
3e keeps the buck and doe, and huats the
sporting gams, sir,
He winds the whip and spur, and makes the
hunters rattle,
And when that he comes home he'll surley
crack a bottle.
ohn Blake for to promote, he played some tune
so merry;
He gave some charming notes to banish melancholy
He'll then blow-np the pipes to play the tune,
brave Larry,                                 [Carey.
You'd laugh untill you'd die to hear sweet Paddy
He'd play the Queen, the Prusian was, the falls
of the Boyne water,
Jaannette and Jeannott, and the Marches of
Alexander,
The blooming sweet cockade, the French brigade
is coming,
'Connell was in for Clare, and all th were
singing,
played the reels of Colleen Down,           
of Kitty's cottage,
The affermonious jig, called—my moher
of pottage.
The Wexford rakes in style, and trip' the world
before him,
The sailor's hornpipe, and Garry Owen and Glory
3e played Kitty from Athlone, with Mooreen
mora Glannow,
Moreen on the road, and the flashy rakes of
Mallow.
Anghrim's overthrow, and the fall of Carring
Brave Sarsfield took command at many afamous
battle,
Ie played the famous chorus jig, the ancient ladies
fancy,
ask and the bottle of punch, and the bonny
Highland laddle,
The ale house in great glee, with the glass of brand
The roving —my dand
Creena, he can play with sil ariatio
The ramble from , the Devil among
Tailors.
The job of journed work, and the boy she I
behind her,
The song of Paddy Whack, and tally-high-
the grinder.
e played the waltz of Bob and Joan, with Jo
Joice the joker,
That famous jig tow-row, that was kept for
Captain Croker.
The bail of Ballinaſad, and the banks of Bannow
Plunkett's Moll in the vad, and Shawn O'Dwyer
of Glana,
played the march of Buonaparte crossing the
Alps in winter,
Th union hornpipe, and the Killinick brave for
huntars,

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         THE BOLD DESERTER.

My parents me , I being their
eldest son,
But little thought it would be my fate to fol-
low the fife and drwn.
The courting of a pretty maid until she won
my heart,
She first advised me for to list and afterwards
,         desert.
She being my mother's waiting maid, no fairer
could be found,
Her cheeks they were a rosy red, her eyes a
lovely brown,
kin it was a lily white, her teeth all in a

her sake I did enlist, that she with me
might go.
word and sash, and scarlet coat, I new
must ay aside,
And to son e lonesome valley go, my fortunes
to abide,
ade adieu to the Light Bobs, where once I
took delight
My journeys too I must pursue, and travel
then by night.
It is under the shelter of a tree I am obliged
to lie,
To shade me from ray enemies, although my
friends are nigh,
I am like the owl that hates the day and dare
not show my face,
With patience waiting for the night, to seek
some distant place.
I have one brother, sailor bold, he knows
not I am here,
But aloud in vain I call on him, his small
boats to draw near,
But alas ! the tide floats him away, his boats
he can't pull to,
And here in pain I still remain, and know not
wha to do.
Oh once I thought I ne'er would be in this de-
jected state,
A poor forlorn effigy, exposed to hardships
great ,
The bird that flutters on each tree with terror
strikes my heart,
Each star I see alarms me—O why did I desert
Oh why did I desert, my boys, or from my
colours fly,
No stint of pay or cowardice, those things I
do deny.
It was cursed whiskey apted me, and dread
misfortune's stroke,
My life is in a state of woe, with grief my
heart is broke.
Now to conclude and maka an ede-d
serting song,
hope to shine in armour bright, and
fore 'tis long,
For my sergeant and my officer have clot
for me in store,
And if they'd combine and pardon me
desert no more.

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