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  THE CELTIC MONTHLY
  It:;
  the highest enconiums. The intrepidity of the
  little baud of Hifjlilanders merits the greatest
  praise." The gallant Colonel in commimicatiug
  the Prince's approbation of the services ren-
  dered by the brigade, added that, " the
  humanity and generosity with which the
  soldiers treated the great lloek of prisoners
  they took, did them as much honour as sub-
  duing the enemy."
  At Graibenstein, in June, 1762, the British
  troops, under the command of the Marquis of
  Granby, " behaved with a bravery not to be
  paralleled, especially the Grenadiers and
  Highlanders." In 1762 were fought the battles
  of VVilhelmstahl and Landwehr-hagen, in which
  the British troops again acquired great dis-
  tinction, cavalry and inf.mtry. Early in 176li
  the "Seven Years' War" was brought to a
  termination by treaty signed in Paris.
  The Highlanders from the peculiarity of
  their dress and the great distinction they won
  in these difterent encounters, attracted the
  notice of the Germans. They had formed the
  most extraordinary notions of them. In
  common with the English then, " they looked
  upon the Highlanders as savages, and believed
  SCOTS GREY— rXIFOHM OF PRIVATE, 181.5.
  them to be strangers to Christianity." Further
  acquaintaintance with the so-called " savages "
  soon dissipated the illusions under which the
  Germans laboured.
  The French too had their own illusions about
  the Highlanders. At first they were disposed
  to treat them with great contempt, but having
  frequently met them and seen them in the
  front of so many battles, they believed there
  were twelve battalions of them instead i>f two.
  On the conclusion of hostilities in November,
  1762, the Highlanders were ordered home. In
  these campaigns they had earned great disinct-
  tion for bravery and good conduct, and so great
  was the estimation in which they were held by
  the Dutch that in their march through Holland
  they were welcomed by acclamation, the women
  presenting them with laurel leaves, no doubt
  prompted by the friendly intercourse that had
  existed previously between the people and the
  Scots Brigade. On their march to Scotland
  through England they received the most
  marked attention, particularly at Derby, whose
  inhabitants presented the men with gratuities
  in money. The most probable reason that may
  be assigned for this remarkable predilection is,

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