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Your search returned 72 broadsides

Displaying broadsides 61 to 72 of 72:

Hurrah! For Francis Jeffrey!
Verse 1: 'Come, ye Electors, ane an' a', / Baith rich an' poor, and great an' sma', / And welcome hame wi' great ec'at / Your weel-kent friend, Frank Jeffrey.' This ballad was to be sung to the tune 'Whistle o'er the Lave o't'. The broadside was published by Sanderson of 243 High Street, Edinburgh.

Husband's Commandments
This satirical broadside begins: '1. I am thy husband; thou shalt have no other husband but me, whom thou didst vow to love, honour and obey; for I saved thee from old-maidenism, and rescued thee from the terror of single blessedness.' A note at the foot of the sheet states that it was published, or supplied, by 'L. Macartney, The Poet's Box, 184 Overgate, Dundee'.

Husband's Secret Let Out!
This poem begins: 'In this fair town not long ago, / As I have heard the story go'. The sheet carries a detailed woodcut depicting an amorous couple in a doorway, being spied upon by a group of gents.

Huy and Cry After Sir John Barlycorn
This ballad begins: 'WE all the Drunkards of the Nation, / Issue Our Royal Proclamation / To you great King at Arms, the Lion, / (Since every Liedge thro' drought is dying;) / With all your bretheren, Heraulds too, / And Pursuevants, that follow you.'

Huzza for Honest Aytoun
This ballad begins: 'The Whigs are vap'ring through the toun, / Wi' Campbell, counsel o' the Croun- / As if a Lunnon lawyer loon / Could ere compete wi' Aytoun!' It was advertised as a new song and was to be sung to the tune, 'The auld wife ayont the fire'. A woodcut illustration of a rather dubious-looking character adorns the top of the sheet.

Huzza for Honest Aytoun!
This political ballad begins: 'THE Whigs are vap'ring through the toun, / Wi' Campbell, counsel of the croun - / As is a lunnun lawyer loon, / Could ere compete wi' Aytoun!' A note below the title states that this is a new song, and should be sung to the tune, 'The auld wife ayont the fire'. While there are no publication details included on this sheet, the reference to Jamie Aytoun suggests that it was almost certainly published in Edinburgh during the 1830s.

Huzza For Reform and the Garland of Green!
Verse 1: 'Let them boast of the Shamrock, the Thistle and Rose, / I sing of what's fairer than any of those - / Of the cause of Reform and the Garland of Green'. The text preceding this reads: 'A NEW SONG. / TUNE - Sprig of Shillelah'. Two woodcuts have been included on this sheet - one at the top of thistles and a bonnet and one at the bottom of a smiling clown's face.

Huzza! for Provost Aytoun!! A New Song
This political ballad begins: 'Come all Reformers sing again, / For what reformer can refrain, / On hearing the heart-string strain, / Huzza for honest Aytoun?' A note below the title states that it should be sung to the tune of 'The Arethusa', which is a traditional Scottish song dating from around 1730. The sheet was published by Waugh of Edinburgh, and the date of publication was probably around 1833.

Huzza! for Provost Spittal!!! An Excellent New Song
The ballad begins: 'YE Whig Reformers all draw near, / To Aytoun'd trash ne'er lend an ear, / But join with me in a counter cheer - / Huzza for Provost Spittal!' A note below the title states that it should be sung to the tune of 'The Arethusa', which is a traditional Scottish song dating from around 1730, and also the name of a poem by the radical poet, Percy Bysshe Shelley. Although no publication date is included, a note at the foot of the sheet states that it was published by Waugh of Edinburgh.

Huzzah for Aytoun
The first verse begins: 'Come all Reformers brave and free, / All honest men come join with me, / And pitch your voice on the highest key, / To sing - Huzza for Aytoun!' Advertised as 'A New Song', it was to be sung to the tune 'The Arethusa'. This broadside includes a woodcut illustration of a man and woman - both of whom appear to be merrily drunk - walking arm in arm.

Huzzah! For Provost Spittle !!! An Excellent New Song
Verse 1 begins: 'Ye Whig Reformers all draw near, / To Aytoun's trash ne'er lend an ear'. The song should be sung to the tune 'The Arethusa' and was printed by Waugh of Edinburgh.

Hymn, to the Victory in Scotland
This ballad begins: 'I sing the praise of Heros brave / Whose Warlike merit conquest gave, / And scorn'd to trample on a Foe, / But beat them first, then let them go: / After a Battle sharp and bloody, / Beyond the reach of Humane Study, / Obtain'd between strong Rocks & Trenches, / By dint of Sword, and vast expences'. The sheet was printed around 1719, by R. Thomas in London. It was also reprinted in Edinburgh.

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