The Word on the Street
home | background | illustrations | distribution | highlights | search & browse | resources | contact us

Subject Browse Results

Your search for ballad returned 911 broadsides

Displaying broadsides 91 to 120 of 911:

Bleaching Lass of Kelvinhaugh
Verse 1: 'I went out one summer's evening, / To view the banks of sweet Kelvinhaugh: / Twas there I met a wee bleacher lassie, / Her cheeks like roses and her skin like snaw.' This song is to be sung to the tune of 'Lord Bateman's Daughter'. It was published by the Poet's Box of Overgate, Dundee, and cost a penny.

Blockade of Edinburgh Castle; or, Captain Taylor in Livingston's Yards
This ballad begins: 'WHERE wholesom Pot-Herbs flourish all around, / And spring luxuriant from the fertile Ground, / Behind a Bush, whose scanty Leaves afford / A flight Defence, whilst loud the Cannons roar'd, / High o'er his Head, and whistling thro' the Air, / The lethal Bullets fly in [b]lack Despair, / Taylor on the cold Earth extended lay, / And thus himself bemoan'd - O luckless Day.'

Bloody Gardener's Cruelty' or 'The Shepherd's Daughter Betray'd
This ballad begins: 'COME all you constant lovers, and to me lend an ear, / And mind this sad relation, which I do give you here'. There are two woodcuts at the top of this sheet. One which represents a man and a woman, of a rustic nature, and some sort of activity being passed from the sky. The other is a dove of hope carrying an olive branch of peace.

Blooming Mountain Rose
Verse 1: 'The moon is bright - her beauty cheers, / The earth, the sky, the sea, lassie, / And fair as her young light appears, / Still fair art thou to me, bonnie lassie, O.' A note below the title states that 'Copies of this very popular song can always be had in the Poet's Box', and that the ballad should be sung to an original air. The sheet was printed on Saturday June 7th, 1873, and cost one penny.

Blue Bells of Scotland
This ballad begins: 'Oh, where, and oh, where is my highland laddie gone, / He's gone to fight the French, for King George upon / the throne, / And it's oh in my heart I wish him safe at home.'

Blue Bonnets Are Over the Border
Verse 1 begins: 'MARCH ! march ! Ettrick and Teviot-dale ! / Why my lads dinna ye march forward in orders?' It was published by T. Birt of 10 Great St Andrew Street, London. It is also noted that the song was greatly enjoyed by audiences when Mr Braham was performing.

Blue Ey'd Mary
Verse 1 begins: 'As I roved out on a summer day, / To view the flowers springing'. This sheet was published by James Lindsay of 9 King Street, Glasgow.

Blythe Johnny Drummond
Verse 1 begins: 'Wha hasna heard tell o' blythe Johnny Drummond, / Wha hasna heard tell o' blythe Johnny Drummond, / If you search a' the warl' frae Lanark to Lunnon, / Ye'll no find the equal o' blythe Johnny Drummond.' The woodcut at the top of the sheet depicts a rather roguish and chirpy gentleman standing on rough ground. The illustration at the bottom is of a well-dressed man in a city street.

Blythe Johnny Drummond
Verse 1 begins: 'Wha hasna heard tell o' blythe Johnny Drummond, / Wha hasna heard tell o' blythe Johnny Drummond, / If you search a' the warl' frae Lanark to Lunnon'. There are two woodcut scenes included on this sheet. The one at the top shows a swashbuckling gentleman. The one at the bottom is of a gentleman walking passed some fine buildings.

Boar Hunt
The ballad begins: 'See the bright sunbeam of gold lights the mountain, / Soon will be gild both the morass and flood.' The text preceeding it reads: 'PRICE ONE PENNY. / Copies of this very popular song can always be had in the POET'S BOX, [text missing] / All kinds of Music supplied to order on moderate terms.' It was to be sung to its own original tune.

Bodies o' the Lyne o' Skene
This ballad begins: 'Ye powers o' rhyme gie me a lift / To string thegither twa'r three line, / About some frien's that I hae here / That's lang been guid to me and mine.' A name at the end of the ballad identifies the writer as W. Chisholm. A note at the foot of the sheet states that it was published by 'A. King and Co., Printers, Aberdeen'. Unfortunately, no date of publication is included on the sheet.

Bold Brannan on the moor
This ballad begins: ?The first of my misfortunes was to list & desert / the way for to rob I soon found an art / Over hedges and ditches when I took my way / And I went a roving by night and by day?. There is no date or place of publication.

Bonnets o' Blue
Verse 1: 'Here's a health to them that's awa', / Here's a health to them that's awa', / And wha winna wish guid luck to our cause / May never guid luck be their fa', / It's guid to be honest and wise, / It's guid to be honest and true, / It's guid to support Caledonia's cause, / And bide by the bonnets o' blue.'

Bonnets o' Blue
This ballad begins: 'Noo I'll sing ye a sang in praise o' that land, / Where the snaw melts on the mountains so grand'. This song was published by the Poet's Box of Dundee.

Bonnie Banks Of Lochlomond
Verse 1: 'It's yon bonny banks and bonny braes, / Where the sun shines bright and bonny, / Where I and my true love went out for to gaze, / On the bonny, bonny banks of Lochlomond.' Below the title we are told that 'Copies of this popular song can be hud at 190 & 192 OVERGATE, DUNDEE'.

Bonnie Bessie Lee
Verse 1 begins: 'Bonnie Bessie Lee had a face fu' o' smiles, / And mirth round her ripe lip was aye dancing slee'. There are two woodcuts on this page. The one included above the title depicts a young man and woman in a field with sickles. The other, at the end of the text, is of a fine lady wearing a grim facial expression.

Bonnie Braes o' Airlie
This ballad begins: 'Bonnie sing the birds in the bright English valleys, / Bonnie bloom the flowers in the lime-sheltered alleys, / Golden rich the air, with perfume laden rarely / But dear far to me the Bonnie Braes o' Airlie.' The song was published by the Poet's Box of Dundee.

Bonnie Brier Bush
Verse 1: 'There grows a bonnie briar bush in oor kail-yard; / An' sweet are the blossoms on't in oor kail-yard, / An ahint that brier bush a ald and lass were heard, / Rich busy, busy cootrn' in oor kail-yard.' The broadside was published by the Poet's Box, Overgate, Dundee.

Bonnie Den o' Airlie
Verse 1: 'It fell upon a day, on a bonnie simmer's day, / We got up in the morning early, / To hae our annual jaunt to that romantic spot, / Yoo've heard o' the Bonnie Den o' Airlie.' The sheet was published in Dundee by the Poet's Box.

Bonnie Ellerslie
Verse 1: 'She's gentle as the zephyr, / That sips of every sweet; / She's fairer than the lily / In nature's soft retreat. / Her eyes are like the crystle brook, / As bright and clear to see; / her lips outshine the scarlet flower / Of bonnie Ellerslie.' This song was to be sung to a tune named 'The Scarlet Flower'. The name and location of the published have been obscured on the broadside.

Bonnie Jeanie Deans
Verse 1: 'Far awa' frae bonnie Scotland, / I have often spent my time, / By the mountains, lakes, and valleys, / In some distant, foreign clime. / There I'd sit and sometimes ponder. / 'Midst their bright and varied scenes, / But my thoughts would always wander / To the hame o' Jeanie Deans.' 'BARR, LONDON STREET, GLASGOW' is printed at the bottom of the sheet.

Bonnie Jeanie Shaw
Verse 1: 'I'm faur awa' frae Scotland / Nae lovin' yin is near, / I dinna see the auld folk / The folk I loe sae dear; / But I'll leave this foreign laun' / Wi its scenes and sichts sae braw; / And I'll wander hame tae Scotland / An' my bonnie Jeanie Shaw'. The song was published by the Poet's Box of Dundee.

Bonnie Lass o' Broughty Ferry
Verse 1: 'A something's birrin through my head, / An' at my heart's a hurlie burlie; / At times I think I'm halflins dead, / An' whiles I laugh an' whiles I'm sury. / I kenna fu' to gie't a name, / That's dung me in this tirrie-wirrie; / Gin it be love, she's a' the blame - / The Bonnie lass o' Boughty Ferry'. The broadside was published by the Poet's Box, Overgate, Dundee, and at the foot of the page, we learn that the publisher also runs a postal service for songs.

Bonnie Lass That Would Lie in a Barrack
Verse 1 begins: 'O say bonnie lass will ye lie in a barrack, / And marry a sodger, and carry his wallet?' There is an address to the reader at the beginning of the song, which comments on the plight and prettiness of soldiers' wives. There is also a pro-Scots coat-of-arms included at the top of the page.

Bonnie Lasses' Answer
Verse 1 begins: 'Farewell to Glasgow, / Likewise to Lanarkshire, / And farewell my dearest parents, / For I'll ne'er see you mair'. This sheet was published by James Lindsay of 11 King Street, Glasgow. The woodcut at the top of the sheet depicts a small town with three women standing talking together in the street.

Bonnie Lassie's Answer
Verse 1: 'Farewell to Glasgow, / Likewise to Lanarkshire, / And farewell my dearest parents, / For I'll never see you mair; / For the want of pocket money, / And for the want of cash, / Makes mony a bonny laddie, / to leave his bonny lass.'

Bonnie Lassie's Answer
Verse 1: 'Farewell to Glasgow, / Likewise to Lanarkshire, / And farewell my dearest parents, / For I'll never see you mair; / For the want of pocket money, / And for the want of cash, / Makes mony a bonny laddie, / to leave his bonny lass.' The chorus begins: 'For I am forced to go, my love / Where no one shall me know'. Included at the top of the sheet is a woodcut illustration of a man and woman holding hands. The word 'Kangaroo' is from the title of another ballad that appeared on the same sheet: 'On Board the Kangaroo'.

Bonnie Lizie Balie
This ballad begins: 'It fell about the Lambmass Tide, / When the Leaves were fresh & green, / Lizie Bailie is to Gartartain / to see her Sister Jean. / She had not been in Gartartain, / even but a little while, / Till Luck and Fortune happn'd her, / and she went to the Isle.' This was a popular ballad, first published as a broadside but later collected in 'Herd's Ancient and Modern Songs' in 1776.

Bonnie Nelly Brown
This ballad begins: 'O bonnie Nelly Brown, / I will sing a sang to thee, / Though oceans wide between us row, / Ye'll aye be dear to me.' The text preceeding it reads: 'This Popular Song can always be had at the Poet's Box, / Overgate Dundee.'

Bonnie Scotland I Adore Three
Verse 1: 'Bonnie Scotland! I adore thee / Now I wander sadly o'er thee, / Thy enchantments will restore me / Bonnie, bonnie Scotland! / Mid the rays of summer weather / Sweetly blooms thy mountain heather; / Love and beauty sport together; / Bonnie bonnie Scotland Oh.'

Results page:   1     2     3     4     5     6     7     8     9     10     11     12     13     14     15     16     17     18     19     20     21     22     23     24     25     26     27     28     29     30     31

 

Return to Search page