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Your search for ballad returned 911 broadsides

Displaying broadsides 721 to 750 of 911:

Robert Muirheads Lament
This ballad begins: 'Leave of my minde why thinks thou on, / She that was once my dear / does thou not know that she is gone, / and married now I hear / what madness make the recolect / to think on such a maide / who allwife payd me with neglect / and my desinges bewraed.' The text preceeding it reads: 'To a Pleasant New Tune'.

Robert Stirrat's
This ballad begins: 'Confession of the Murder of his own Aunt in John Street, Glasgow. / The morning was calm, and it dawned with joy, / To the hearts of the weary, now freed from employ. / And the day it was sacred, to rest set apart, / When Stirrat resolved to pierce his aunt's heart.' This sheet was published by the printer William Carse.

Robin Rattle's Bastard
The first verse of this ballad begins: 'Saw ye Jenny Nettles, Jenny Nettles, Jenny Nettles, / Coming frae the matket; / Her fee and bountith on her lap'. The sheet was published by William Anderson, at the Poet's Box, Paisley. A woodcut of a mother and child, framed by a border of foliage, adorns the top of the sheet.

Robin Tamson's Smiddy
Verse 1: 'My mither men't my auld breeks, / An' wow! But they were duddy, / An sent me to get shod our mare / At Robin Tamson's smiddy. / The smiddy stands beside a burn / That wimples through the clachan; / I never yet gae by the door, / But aye I fa' a lauchin.' The printer and supplier of this broadside are not identified, but at the foot of the page there is an advertisment for songbooks 'sent post free to any address for 7 stamps'.

Robin's So Shy
Verse 1: 'Young Robin, my sweetheart, is handsome and fair, / His cheeks are fresh coloured and raven his hair, / My Robin is nimble and light on his feet, / To me he's the dearest I ever did meet, / But Robin's so shy: / 'Tis very distressing that Robin's so shy.' This ballad was to be sung to an 'Original' tune and was priced at one penny. It was published on Saturday, 9th March 1867, by the Poet's Box, probably in Glasgow.

Rocks of Bonnie Gibraltar
Verse 1: 'The first night I was married, laid in my marriage bed / There came a bold sea-captain and stood at my bed side / Says arise arise O young man and go along with me / To the rocks of bonnie Gibraltar to fight the enemy.' A note below the title states that ' This popular song can always be had at the Poet's Box, 224 Overgate, Dundee'.

Roderick the Last of the Goths, and the Knight of the Iron Visage, Engaging the Tories and Radicals
Verse 1: 'The Whigs hae taken the field, Edie, / The Whigs hae taken the field, / We maun strain every nerve, / Our Party to serve, / And force our opponents to yield, Edie, / We maun blin the enemy's een, Edie, / We maun blin the enemy's een, / While we cry 'Dinna pledge,' / Let us try to engage, / As mony's we can while unseen, Edie.'

Rodney's Glory
This ballad begins: 'Come all you Britons stout and bold / Who scorns now to be controu'd / Good news unto you I will unfold / It is of brave Rodney's glory / Who always bore a noble heart / And from his colours ne'er could start / But always takes his country's part'.

Room, Room for a Rover
This ballad begins: ' Room, Room, Room for a Rover, / London is so Hot; / I a Country Lover, / bless my Freedom got; / This Celestial Weather, / such enjoyment gives, / We like Birds flock hither, browsing on green leaves.' It is subtitled 'OR An Innocent Country Life prefer'd before the Noise Claymors of a Restless Town. The ballad was to be sung 'To a New Tune', not named, and was published by John Moncur of Sclater's Close in Edinburgh, in 1707.

Roslin Castle
Verse 1: ''Twas in the season of the year, / When all things gay and light appear, / That Colin with his morning ray, / Arose and sung the rural lay, / Of Nanny's charms the Shepherd sung, / The hills and dales with Nanny rung / While Roslin Castle heard the swain, / And echo'd back the cheerful strain.' The broadside carries no publication details.

Royal Robe
This ballad begins: 'Come all ye knight templars that blest round the globe, / That wear the badge of honour, I mean the royal robe; / For Noah he wire it in the ark where he stood, / When the world was destroyed by a deluge flood.' The sheet was published by James Kay of Glasgow, and cost one penny.

Royal Shepherd's Happy Life
This ballad begins: 'How sweet was the time when keeped our Flocks, / In Shades of the Mountains, and Coverts of Rocks?' This ballad is sung to the tune of 'The Yellow-hair'd Laddie: Or Jenney Milking the Ewes'.

Russian Host
Verse 1: 'Scotland, aroused from her slumbers, / By the war-drnm which beats the alarms, / Ne'er afraid for to face hostile numbers, / When arrayed in her wild warlike arms. / Since the days of the great Julius Caesar, / Till Alma's heights stood in view, / There the Russian host did surrender, / To the lads with their bonnets sae blue! / Three cheers for the bonnets, &c.'

Russians Are Coming! Or, the Finishing Stroke
Verse 1 begins: 'The Russians are coming to Scotland they say, / Get ready old women, they're now on their way ; / Be true to your colours and laugh at the joke'.

Sailor and farmer's daughter
This ballad begins: ?A sailor courted a farmer?s daughter / that lived convenient to the Isle of man / But mark good people what followed after / a long time courting against their will?. There is no date or place of publication.

Sailor Boy
This ballad begins: 'One dark and stormy night / The snow lay on the ground / A sailor boy stood on the quay / His ship was out ward bound . . . ' Below the title, we are told that this ballad 'Can be had at the Poet's Box, Dundee', and that it costs one penny.

Sailors Adventures in Edinburgh
This ballad begins: 'As I came into Edinburgh, / down by the High Street I did stray, / To drink I to a change-house went, / I spent all that night and the next day'. The chorus begins: 'Lilty turin inurin inurin, / Lilty turin inurin inay'. 'Change-house' is Scots for an 'alehouse' or 'tavern'. A woodcut illustration of a drunken man addressing the moon has been included at the top of this sheet.

Sally Munro
Verse 1: 'Come all you young females I pray you attend, / Unto these few lines that I have here pen'd; / I'll tell you the hardships I did undergo, / With my bonny lass named Sally Munro, / James Dixon's my name, I'm a blacksmith by trade / In the town of Ayr I was born and bred, / From that unto Belfast I lately did go, / There I got acquainted with Sally Munro.' The broadside carries no publication details.

Sally Munro
Verse 1: 'Come all you young females I pray you attend, / Unto these few lines that I have here pen'd; / I'll tell you the hardships I did undergo, / With my bonny lass called Sally Munro, / James Dixon's my name, I'm a blacksmith by [t]rade / In the town of Ayr I was born and bred, / From that unto Belfast I lately did go, / There I got acquainted with Sally Munro.' The sheet carries no publication details.

Samson's Foxes
This ballad begins: 'FROM the fine Roman Whore, or Geneva Slut; / The one dawbed with Paint, the other with Smut; / From the Beast's horned Head, or his cloven Foot, / Libera, &c.' The text preceeding it reads: 'A New Litany, / To the Tune of, An old Courtier of the Queen.' It was printed by James Watson, of Edinburgh, in 1713.

Samson's Foxes, a New Litany
This ballad begins: 'From the fine Roman Whore, or Geneva Slut ; / The one dawbed with Paint, the other with Smut ; / From the Beast's horned Head, or his cloven Foot'. It is to be sung to the tune of 'An old Courtier of the Queen'. It was published in Edinburgh by James Watson, in 1713.

Sandy and the Days o' Langsyne
Verse 1: 'What makes ye sae wae, wi' tear in your e'e, / For blythe ye was ance, man, wi' pleasure and glee. / Come gie me yer loof in this auld loof o' mine, / And we'll tak a wee drappie for the days o' langsyne.' The name of the publisher is not included and the sheet is not dated.

Satyr upon Allan Ramsay
This ballad begins: 'D----d brazen Face, how could you hope / To imitate Horatian Strain, / A Labour roo refin'd for Pope, / A Task which pussel'd Prior's Pen.' Because, at the time this was printed, 'damned' was considered a strong word to put into print, the dashes represent the other letters. The 'D' of the first word has been illuminated; a swan nestles inside it and foliage decorates the outside. No publication details are present.

Scotch Medley
This ballad begins: 'Gae bring my guid auld harp ance mair, / Gae bring it free and fast ; / Of a' the airts the win' can blaw, / I dearly lo'e the wast'. This translates as 'Go bring my good harp once more, / Go bring it free and fast; / Of all the arts the wind can blow, / I dearly love the west.' It is to be sung to the tune of 'Scotland Yet'. It was published in Dundee by the Poet's Box.

Scotch Words
Verse 1: 'They speak in riddles north between the Tweed, / The plain, pure English they can deftly read; / Yet when without the book they come to speak, / Their lingo is half English and half Greek.' Although the sheet is not dated and the publisher is not named, a note below the title states that 'Copies can always be had at 80 London Street'.

Scotia's Dirge
Verse 1: 'AULD Scotia now may sigh aloud, / Her tears in torrents fa', / Her sweetest harp now hangs unstrung, / Since WILSON'S ta'en awa'. / He sang o' a' her warlike deeds, / An' sons that gallant were - / Her hoary towers, an' snaw-clad hills, / An maidens sweet an' fair.' The poem is an elegy on 'JOHN WILSON, Esq., the Scottish Vocalist, who died in America, on the 9th July 1849.' The author was William Jamie of Gourdon Schoolhouse, and the poem is dated 7th August 1849.

Scotia's Thistle
Verse 1: 'Scotia's thistles guard the grave, / Where repose our dauntless brave; / Never yet the foot of slave / Hath trod the wilds of Scotia. / Free from tyrant's dark control, / Free as waves of ocean roll, / Free as thought of minstrel soul, / Still roam the sons of Scotia.' This broadside was priced at one penny and published on Saturday, 21st May 1870, by the Poet's Box. The town of publication has been obscured, but was probably Glasgow.

Scotland Yet
Verse 1: 'Gae bring my guid auld harp ance mair, / Gae bring it free and fast, / For I maun sing anither sang / E'er a' my glee be past; / and trow ye, as I sing, my lads / The burden o't shall be - / Auld Scotland's howes, and Scotland's knowes / And Scotland's hills for me; / I'll drink a cup to Scotland yet, / Wi' a' the honours three!' This broadside was published by James Lindsay of King Street in Glasgow. It is not dated.

Scotland's Stagnation! or, Where Is All The Money Gone
This ballad begins: 'The oldest person in the world, on land or on the water, / Never saw such times before, since Sampson killed his daughter.' The chorus reads: 'Tens of thousands out of work, what will the country come to ? / I cannot think, says every one, where all the trade is gone to.'

Scotland's Stagnation; or, where is al the Money Gone?
Verse 1: 'The oldest person in the world, on land or on the water, / Never saw such times before, since Sampson killed his daughter. / The peoples' doors, I am so sure, are on the hinges creaking; / All clothes are pop'd, all works are stopp'd, and all the Merchants breaking.' The sheet carries no publication details.

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