The Word on the Street
home | background | illustrations | distribution | highlights | search & browse | resources | contact us

Subject Browse Results

Your search for ballad returned 911 broadsides

Displaying broadsides 631 to 660 of 911:

Norah O'Neil
Verse 1: 'Oh! I'm lonely to-night, love, without you, / And sigh for one glance of your eye, / For sure there's a charm, love, about you, / Whenever I know you are nigh. / Like the beam of the star when 'tis smiling, / Is the glance which your eye can't conceal; / And your voice is so sweet and beguiling, / That I love you, sweet Norah O'Neil.' This ballad was to be sung to an 'Original' tune and was priced at one penny. It was published on Saturday, 20th February 1869 by the Poet's Box, probably in Glasgow.

Northern Ditty; Or, the Scotchman Outwitted by a Country Lass
This ballad begins: 'COLD and raw the North did blow, / Bleak in the morning early; / All the trees were hid with snow / Covered with winter early'. A rather crude woodcut has been included on this sheet depicting a man and woman on horseback. The woman has just escaped across the river, while her persuer looks on in frustration. There is a town and a hill in the background of the image.

Norval on the Grampian Hills
This ballad begins: 'My name is Norval. On the Grampian hills / My father feeds his flocks; a frucal swain; / Whose constant cares were to increase his store, / And keep his only son, myself, at home.' The sheet was published by the Poet's Box, but it is not clear where.

Nothing at all
Verse 1: 'In Derry-down Dale when I wanted a mate, / I went with my daddy a-courting to Kate; / With my nosegay so fine, and my holiday clothes, / My hands in my pockets, a courting I goes; / the weather was cold and my bosom was hot, / My heart in a gallop, my mare in a trot; / Now I was so bashful, and loving withal, / My tongue stuck to my mouth, I said nothing at all, / But fol, de rol.' This ballad was published on Saturday, 24th November 1855 by the Poet's Box in Glasgow, priced one penny.

Nothing More
Verse 1: 'In a fair valley I wandere'd, / O'er its meadow pathways green; / Where a singing brook was flowing, / Like the spirit of the scene; / And I saw a lovely maiden, / With a basket brimming o'er; / With sweet buds, and so I ask'd her / For a flower, and - nothing more.' It was printed by Robert M'Intosh, probably in Glasgow.

Nottinghamshire Ballade
This ballad begins: 'AN orator was found in Nottinghamshire, / Who for his great Parts was summon'd to appear / At Court, to give the necessary assistance there.' The text preceeding the ballad reads: 'An Excellent / New SONG, / BEING / The Intended Speech of a Famous Orator.' It was published in 1711.

Now Jenny Lass My Bonny Bird
This ballad begins: 'Now Jenny lass, my bonny bird / My daddy's dead an' a' that, / He's snugly laid a-neath the yaird, / An' I'm his heir an' a' that.' The name of the publisher is not included and the sheet is not dated.

Now, We Will Get Married. We've Got Nothing Else To Do
The first verse reads: 'I am a yeung man in search of a wife, / All for to be the pleasures and comforts of my life, / If anyone should hear me, and I declare its true, / Saying, now we will get married, we've got nothing else to do.' A woodcut illustration showing a young couple sitting underneath a tree, surrounded by several figures, has been included. There are no publication details given, but this is one of two songs - printed by James Lindsay - on this sheet.

O Caledon, O Caledon
This ballad begins: 'O CALEDON, O CALEDON, / How wretch is thy Fate, / I, thy St. ANDREW do lament, / Thy poor abandon'd State.' The text preceeding it reads: 'An Excellent new / SONG / To the Tune of, OLD LONG SYNE.'

Och Hey, Johnnie Lad
This ballad begins: 'Och hey, Johnnie Lad! / Ye're no sae kind's ye should ha'e been, / Och hey, Johnnie lad!' Included at the top of the sheet is a woodcut illustration of a well-dressed man holding a sword behind his head.

O'Connell the Brave!
This ballad begins: 'You sons of Old Scotia, now show yourselves true, / Hoist up the thistle, with the buff and the blue, / All for the sake of the shamrock so green, / M. P. O'Connell he soon will be here'. The piece was written by John McLean, coalminer. It was published by Sanderson of Edinburgh.

O'Donnell Abu! and Jamie Raeburn
These ballads begin: 'Proudly the note of the trumpet is sounding, / Loudly the war cries arise on the gale, / Fleetly the steed by Loch Suilig is bounding, / To join the thick squadrons in Saimear's green vale'; 'My name is Jamie Raeburn, / In Glasgow I was born, / My place and habitation / I was forced to leave in scorn.' The broadside was priced at one penny and published by James Kay of Glasgow.

Old Arm Chair
This ballad begins: 'I love it, I love it, and who shall dare / To chide me for loving that old arm chair: / I've treasured it long as a noble prize, / I've bedewed it with tears, and embalmed it with sighs'. It was published by James Lindsay of 9 King Street, Glasgow, and probably sold for one penny.

Old Long Syne
This ballad begins: 'Should Old Acquaintance be forgot, / and never thought upon, / The flames of Love extinguished, and fully past and gone.' The text preceeding it reads: ' An excellent and proper New Ballad, Entituled, / OLD LONG SYNE / Newly corrected and amended, with a large and new / Edition of several excellent Love Lines. / To be sung with its own proper Musical Sweet Tune.'

Old World; or, It is Far from the World that I Have Seen
This ballad begins: 'WHen Vesperus with Vitage gray, / Had darkened all our Hemisphere,' and ends, unusually, with: 'AMEN'. It was supposed to be sung to its own proper tune.

On board the "Kangaroo"
Verse 1: 'Once I was a waterman, / And lived at home at ease; / Now I am a mariner, / And plough the angry seas; / I thought I'd like a seafarin' life, / So bid my love "adoo," / And shipped as cook and stewart, boys, / On board o' the "Kangaroo."

On the banks of Allan Water
This ballad begins: 'On the banks of Allan Water / When the sweet spring-time did fall / Was the miller's lovely daughter, / Fairest of them all.' The text preceeding it reads: 'This Popular Song can always be had at the Poet's Boz, 224 Overgate Dundee.'

On the Banks of Allan Water
Verse 1: 'On the banks of Allan Water / When the sweet spring-time did fall / Was the miller's lovely daughter, / Fairest of them all, / For his Brlde a soldier sought her, / And a winning tongue had he! / On the banks of Allan Water, / None so gay as she.' The broadside was published by the Poet's Box in Dundee. It does not carry a date of publication.

One pound two
This ballad begins: 'Now, Maggy dear, I do declare, / You have been on the spree, / Where is my whole weeks' wages gone, / I pray now tell to me.'

One Pound Two
This ballad begins: 'Now Maggy dear, I do hear you have been on the spree. / Where is my whole week's wages gone, I pray come tell to me / When I come home at night I get no smell of drink on you, / Yet I wish to know how you lay out my one pound two.' It was published by James Lindsay of 9 King Street, Glasgow, and includes a woodcut illustration of a young man begging before a seated gentleman. A woman stands to one side and a windmill is visible in the background.

One Pound Two
This ballad begins: 'Now Maggy dear, I do hear you have been on the spree, / Where is my whole week's wages gone, I pray come tell to me'. A note at the top states that the sheet was 'Printed and Sold by JAMES LINDSAY, Stationer, &c,, 9 King Street, Glasgow'.

Oor Maggie's got a Bairn
This ballad begins: 'While taking a crack ower a guid social drap, / In a public-house near to the station / Blawing up their heads about my great deeds, / And other important things o' the nation'. It was published in Dundee by the Poet's Box.

Oor Wee Kate
Verse 1: 'Was there ever sic a lassie kent as oor wee Kate? / There's no a wean in a' the toon like oor wee Kate; / Baith in an' out, at kirk and schule she rins at sic a rate, / A pair o shoon list last a month wi poor wee Kate.' Below the title we are told that 'Copies can always be had at the Poet's Box, 192 OVERGATE, DUNDEE'. 'Shoon' means 'shoes'.

Orphan Boy
Verse 1 begins: 'I hear the people sing about the Drunkard's raggit wean, / As I wander through the streets, quite dejected and alane, / Baith hungry, cauld, and raggit, and nae frien's at a' hae I'. It is not clear from the introduction whether John Wilson of Glasgow was the publisher or author, or both, of this sheet.

Oul' Bog Hole
Verse 1 begins: 'The pig is in the mire, and the cow is on the grass, / And a man without a woman is no better than an ass'. The reader is directed to sing this song to the 'Air - 'Old Zipcoon'. There is a woodcut included above the title which shows a hooded and shawled girl, carrying a basket, walking along a country path.

Paddy on the Railway
This ballad begins: 'A PADDY once in Greenock town, / For Glasgow city he was bound, / Staring all round and round, / At length he saw the Railway.' A woodcut illustration of a man carrying two guns has been included at the top of the sheet. Standing next to him is a dog or some other type of animal. Sometimes used in a derogatory way, 'Paddy' is a familiar form of the name Patrick or an informal name for an Irishman.

Paisley Officer
This ballad begins: 'In blythe and bonny Scotland, where the blue bells do grow, / There dwelt a pretty fair maid down in a valley low.' The woodcut included above the title shows a wooded valley. At the bottom of the valley a uniformed man is being brutally attacked by both women and men, one of whom is on a horse.

Paisley Officer
This ballad begins: 'In blythe and bonny Scotland where the blue bells do grow, / There dwelt a pretty maid down in a valley low. / Its all the day long she herded sheep upon the banks of Clyde, / Although her lot in life was low she was called the village pride.' The broadside carries no publication details.

Paisley Officer
Verse 1: 'In blythe and bonny Scotland, where the blue bells do grow, / There dwelt a pretty fair maid down in a valley low'. A woodcut has been included at the top of the sheet. It shows a vanquished man in a wooded glade, surrounded by threatening advisories.

Panegyrick on Robert Cowan's Trip to the Tron
This ballad begins: 'What Moonshine or Trade-wind hath blown thee here, / Loadstone of Trade, why did the Skipper Stear / Thy Vessel for to Harbour at this Tree, / And failing down our Coasts cry Helmalee.' Following on from the title, there is some text explaining the motive for writing this ballad, some scribbled notes and a dedication in Latin. Although no publisher is named, the sheet was printed in 1724.

Results page:   1     2     3     4     5     6     7     8     9     10     11     12     13     14     15     16     17     18     19     20     21     22     23     24     25     26     27     28     29     30     31

 

Return to Search page