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Your search for ballad returned 911 broadsides

Displaying broadsides 601 to 630 of 911:

New Medley
Verse 1: 'Of a' the airts the wind can blaw, / Out o'er Benlomond's hill; / She says she loe's me best of a', / The lass of Paities's Mill. / My love she's like the red red rose, / That's newly sprung in June; / Behind yon hills where Lugar flows, / And the banks o' bonnie Doon.'

New Police
Verse 1: 'I'm one of the new police, egad, / The servant maids declare, / There's not a chap in all the force, / can sturt with such an air; / My gloves of white, my coat of blue, / My diginity increase, / And every gesture shows to you. / That I'm one of the new police.' This broadside is not dated and does not carry the name of the publisher or the place of publication.

New Scotch Ballad: Call'd Bothwell-Bridge: Or, Hamilton's Hero
Verse 1: 'When valiant Bucklugh charg'd his Foes, / And put the Rebel Scots to flight, / Full many a Gallant Squire arose / And rush'd into the Fight.' The lyrics should be sung to the tune, 'Fortune my Foe'. It was published in 1679 for T.B. of London.

New Song
This ballad sheet begins: 'Air, ? "Welcome Royal Charlie". / Gude news we meet in ilka street, ? "MACAULAY'S cause speeds rarely;" / For ilka fae ,twa friend's we hae'.

New song
This ballad begins: ?Sin? my uncle?s dead, I?ve lads anew / Wha? ne?er cam here before to woo / But to the laddie, I?ll prove true / that lo?ed me first O ony o?.

New Song
This ballad begins: 'FAREWELL to Lochaber, and farewell my Jean, / Where heartsome with thee I've mony a Day been; / For Lochaber no more, Lochaber no more, / We'll may be return to Lochaber no more.' This ballad is sung to the tune of 'Lochaber no more', and there is a generic woodcut scene of hunting at the top of the page.

New Song
This ballad begins: 'ADIEU, my Celia, Oh adieu! / Adieu my only Treasur!' The text preceeding the ballad reads: 'To the Tune of, Peggy I must love thee. / The Words, by Mr. Ramondon, Senior.' There are two woodcuts at the top of the sheet.

New Song Called The Bold McLusky
The first verse reads: 'You gallant sons of freedom that come from Erin's island, / Come listen to a verse or two, its worthy of your smiling, / A battle was fought in Cumberland - a battle too most cruel, / It was between M'Lusky bold and the brave Anthony Suel.' It was published by James Lindsay of 9 King Street, Glasgow, and probably sold for one penny.

New Song Called the Bridgeton Tradegy
Verse 1 begins: 'Good people all of Glasgow, pray listen unto me, / Whilst I relate this woeful tale and mournful tradegy'. The woodcut at the top of this sheet shows an Irish leprechaun reading an outsize book.

New Song for the Electors of the County of Midlothian
This political ballad begins: 'Oh! The gallant Sir John is a Knight of renown, / And from London post-haste he has lately come down, / Having fairly got out of that innocent scape, / Of the Banners, and Mottos, and bits of Black Crape'. A note below the title states that the ballad should be sung to the traditional tune, 'The Young Lochinvar'. Although there are no publication details included on this sheet, the reference to Jamie Aytoun suggests that it was most likely published in Edinburgh during the 1830s.

New Song of Mallinger
This ballad begins: 'As I went to Mallinger Fair / with my Battel of Bear, / I met with young Peggie, / who's Beautie was clear. / Ratting a rew.' The text preceeding it reads: 'OR, / The Female-Dear-Joy tricked of her Maiden-Head. / To a New Irish Tune.'

New Song on Reform
The first verse begins: 'Oh! Reform now it is the rage, / Wherever you may go; / Mr. Bright now of the present age, / The seed began to sow.' The chorus begins: 'So good people all, on you I call, / And mark what I do say'. There are no publication details given, but this is one of two songs - printed by James Lindsay - on this sheet.

New Song on the Dear Times
This song begins: 'Good people pay attention / To these my humble rhymes, / About the state of Trade, / And those shocking dear times'. The chorus begins: 'Things are so high, poor people cry, / Such times was ne'er before'. It was written by John Wilson of Glasgow, and published by the printer and wholesaler, James Lindsay, of 9 King Street, Glasgow.

New Song on the Dear Times
Verse 1 begins: 'Good people pay attention / To these my humble rhymes, / About the state of Trade, / And those shocking dear times'. This poem was written by John Wilson, Glasgow. The sheet was published by James Lindsay of 9 King Street, Glasgow.

New Song to an Old Tune
This ballad begins: '[VI]CTORIA's doun to Embro' toun, / The Queen o' the North to see, / And a' are join'd in heart and mind / To welcome her wi' glee'. It was to be sung to the tune of 'Up, an' Waur them a', Willie', and cost one penny to buy.

New Song to an Old Tune
Verse 1: 'VICTORIA's doun to Embro' toun, / The Queen o' the North to see, / And a' are join'd in heart and mind / To welcome her wi' glee; / But our Duke, and Peel, that sleeky chiel, / The management hae ta'en, / And honest Leith - in spite her teeth - / She's slighted been again.' The song was to be sung to the tune 'Up, an' Waur Them A', Willie'. The broadside was priced at one penny. It does not carry the name of the publisher or the place of publication.

New Song to an Old Tune
Verse 1 begins: '[VI]CTORIA doun to Embro' toun, / Queen o' the North to see, / And a' are joined in heart and mind'. The song should be sung to the tune 'Up, An' Waur Them A', Willie' and would have sold for a penny a copy.

New Song, Called the Bridgeton Tragedy
Verse 1 begins: 'Good people all of Glasgow, pray listen unto me, / Whilst I relate this woeful tale and mournful tragedy'. This sheet was printed by James Lindsay of 9 King Street, Glasgow (1852-59).

New Way of Bonny Jean
Verse 1: 'The Nymph. / Loves fairest Youth, in blooming May, / stood Musing by a River Side, / Where the Bright Goddess of the Day, / Had deck'd the Plain in Glorious Pride: / Then Laurels green crown'd bonny Jean, / And secret Flames bred Constancy; / Almighty Jove soon from above, / Fix'd Love's sweet Passions in her Eye.' This broadside was published by John Reid of Pearson's Close in Edinburgh, in 1719.

New Way of Gaberlunyman
Verse 1: ONce in a Morning Sweet and Fair, / as I went forth to take the Air, / I spip'd a Nimph without Compare, / was following the Gaberlunyman.' This ballad was to be sung 'To its own Proper New Tune'. The broadside carries no date or place of publication.

New Way of Jocky Blyth and Gay
Verse 1: ' BLyth Jockie young and gay, / Is all my hearts delight, / He's all my talk by Day, / And in my Dreams by night. / If from the Lad I be, / It's Winter then with me, / But when he's with me here, / 'Tis Summer all the year.' The text under the title reads, 'A song much in Request' and 'To an Excellent new Tune'. The name of the publisher has not been included.

New Way of the Bonny Highland Laddie, &c.
This ballad begins: 'I crossed Forth, I crossed Tay, / I left Dundee, and Edinborrow, / I saw nothing there was worth my stay.' This song was supposed to be sung to its own proper tune.

New Way of the Broom of Cowden Knows
Verse 1: 'HArd Fate that I should banisht be / And Rebell called with Scorn, / For serving of a Lovely Prince, / As e'er yet was Born, / O the Broom the Bonny Broom, / The Broom of Cowding Knows, / I wish his Frinds had Stayed at home / Milking there Dadys Ewes.'

New way, of the Bonny Highland Laddie
This ballad begins: 'I crossed Forth, I crossed Tay, / I left Dundee, and Edinborrow, / I saw nothing there worth my Stay, / and so I bad them all Good-morrow . . . ' Below the title, a note states that this ballad is sung 'To it's own Proper Tune &c'.

New Whig Garland
Verse 1: 'I am a freeman, tight and sound, / Of Edinbro's good town, / For trade and lads of honest heart, / A place of high renown'. The song is by 'C. M'K.' and should be sung to the tune 'A begging we will go'. There is a woodcut depiction of a well-dressed lady resting, with her basket, under a leafy tree in the countryside.

New Year
This ballad is sung to the tune of the 'Laird of Cockpen' and begins: 'To get drunk at Nairday is counted nae sin, / Although that your neighbours be leadin' you blin', / For wasting of money there's naebody cares; / They run and they'll roar like the Russian bears.' The chorus begins: 'And now we've to enter another New Year, / When little is thought on but whisky and beer'. A woodcut illustration showing a man standing next to large kegs of whisky, rum and brandy has been included at the top of this sheet.

New Year's Song. Comrades, Comrades
This ballad begins: 'We from childhood played together, / My dear comrade Jack and I; / We would fight each other's battles, / To each other's aid we'd fly'. The sheet was published by the Poet's Box of 224 Overgate, Dundee.

Newhaven Fishwife
Verse 1: 'Look kind on me, I'm sure you ought, / I dinna feel just richt, sirs; / I'm rather bashfu', 'tis my faut, / My first attempt the nicht, sirs. / At me I see the laddies steal / Sly looks of admiration; / But ladies ye alane can feel / My delicate situation.' This was to be sung to the tune of 'Up in the Morning?s no for Me'. The broadside was published on 27th June 1874, priced at one penny, and published by the Poet?s Box in Glasgow.

Noble Man's Generous Kindness; or, the Country-man's Unexpected Happiness
Verse 1: 'A Noble Man lived near a Village of late, / Hard by a poor T[h]resher, whose Charge it was great; / He had seven children and most of them small, / And none but his Labour to keep them withall.' The ballad was to be sung 'To an Excellent New Tune'. The top of the broadside is illustrated with woodcuts, the first showing one man extending the hand of friendship to another, the second showing an armed man on horseback.

Norah Magee
Verse 1: 'Norah, dear Norah, I cant live without you, / What made you leave me to cross the wide sea / Norah, dear Norah, oh! why did you doubt me / The world seems so dark and so drearly to me? / Why from old Ireland have you been a ranger / Why have you chosen the wide world to roam / Why did you go to the land of the stranger, / And leave your own Barney alone, all alone?' This song was published by the Poet's Box, 190 & 192 Overgate, Dundee.

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