The Word on the Street
home | background | illustrations | distribution | highlights | search & browse | resources | contact us

Subject Browse Results

Your search for ballad returned 911 broadsides

Displaying broadsides 571 to 600 of 911:

Mound's Appeal
This ballad begins: 'SCOTMEN ! In Auld Reekie born, / You, who fools and tyrants scorn, / Welcome, this bright April morn, / To do the needful here !'

Mr Aytoun's Campaign against the Airdrie Radicals
This ballad begins: 'COME Brother Conservatives, fill up your glasses, / And start to your feet with hearty hurra! / Tho no more we may draw our broad swords on the asses, / Our tricks and our cunning will win us the day.' An illustration of a haughty-looking man astride a horse that is too small for him, adorns the top of the sheet. He is waving at a mother and her two small children.

Mr John Dowie
This broadside letter begins: 'MR JOHN DOWIE, Libberton's Wynd, Edinburgh. / DEAR JOHNNIE, / I cannot with-hold this tribute of my gratitude from you.' The letter is marked 'EDINBURGH, / 14th Sept. 1789', and is followed by a poem entitled 'Johnnie Dowie's Ale'.

Mrs. M'Leod's last Farewel to John Gibson
Verse 1: 'Now John what makes thee look so shan, / Brush up and look couragious, Man. / We have mad many a Cog between us / E'en Fan De'el a Saul has seen us / And since that nearest Friends must part / Here's to your Health with a' my Heart...' The name of the publisher is not included. 'Shan' is a Scots word meaning 'pitiful'.

Muckle meal pock
This broadside contains two separate ballads. The opening line of the first ballad reads: 'I am a sturdy beggar loon, weel kent the country through'. The opening line of the second ballad reads: 'As I walked out one morning all in the month of May'. This sheet was printed by James Kay of Glasgow and cost one penny. According to the National Library of Scotland's Scottish Book Trade Index, James Kay's publishing business was located at 179 Argyll Street in 1844.

Muckle Meal Pock and Irish Molly, O
This broadside contains two separate ballads. The opening line of the first ballad reads: 'I am a sturdy beggar loon, weel kent the country through'. The opening line of the second ballad reads: 'As I walked out one morning all in the month of May'. This sheet was printed by James Kay of Glasgow and cost one penny. According to the National Library of Scotland's Scottish Book Trade Index, James Kay's publishing business was located at 179 Argyll Street in 1844.

Mungo M'Gill
Verse 1 begins: 'Draw near ilka wight, that licens'd to retail / A dribble o' spirits, an' porter, an' ale, / While I sing o' a carle, a great mense to your trade, / Tho' he forty land miles frae King Willie was bred.'

Mungo M'Gill
Verse 1 begins: 'Draw near ilka wight, that licens'd to retail / A dribble o' spirits, an' porter, an ale, / While I sing o' a carle, a great mense to your trade, / Tho' he forty lang miles frae King Willie was bred.' There is no other information attached to this sheet.

Murder of Betsy Smith
This murder ballad begins: 'COME all false hearted young men and listen to my song, / It's of a dreadful murder that lately has been done ; / On the body of a damsel fair, the truth I will unfold, / The bare relation of this deed will make your blood run cold.' It was published by Robert McIntosh of 96 King Street, Calton, Glasgow, and includes a rather crude woodcut illustration.

Murder of Maria Marten
Verse 1: 'Come all you thoughtless young men, a warning take by me, / And think upon my unhappy fate to be hanged upon a tree; / My name is William Corder, to you I do declare, / I courted Maria Marten, most beautiful and fair.' The name of the publisher is not included and the sheet is not dated.

My Ain Fireside
Verse 1: 'Come, my lads, let us mount and go, / For I'm going home, will ye gang or no? / For the drink's a' done; and the reckonings paid, / And I'm going home to my ain fire-side.' The publisher of this broadside was Muir, but the town and the date of publication are not cited.

My Ain Folk, They're Far Far Awa, Gallowa' Hills, and Dark Flodden Field
The first ballad begins: 'Far frae my ain hame I wander, / But still my thoughts return'. The second ballad begins: 'They're far ower the sea, the freen's we lo'e sae weel, / They're far, far across the stormy main'. The third ballad begins: 'Says I, bonnie lassie, will ye gang wi' me, / An' leave your friends in their ain country?' The fourth ballad begins: 'Our bravest on the turf lie dead / On dark Flodden Field'.

My Big Wig All So Mealy and White
Verse 1 begins: 'Plain John is my name, though they've made me Sir John, / A straight-forward man, when I have not got on / My big wig all so mealy and white'. The introduction reveals that the song was sung by his Majesty's Attorney-General to the tune 'The Black Joke'.

My Bonnie Meg, My Jo
Verse 1 begins: 'My bonnie Meg, my jo, Meg, / When we were first acquant, / A tighter hizzy never brush'd / The dew frae aff the bent'. The woodcut at the top of the sheet shows a well-to-do couple, seemingly arguing, in what appears to be a parlour.

My Boughel Roe
Verse 1 begins: 'Come all ye tender lovers till I relate my grief, / My darling's gone and left me with the small hopes of relief'. The top of the sheet carries a woodcut of a grand, classical-styled building, which is built over an archway. There are no publication details given, but this is one of two songs - printed by James Lindsay - on this sheet.

My Father's Old Coat
This ballad begins: 'There's puir wee Johnny Clark, / That Sells the News and Star, / He whistles and he sings, / And he paddles through the glaur'. 'Glaur' is a Scots word used to describe muddy, slippery, and especially icy conditions. The song was published by the Poet's Box of Dundee.

My Friend Bill
This ballad begins: 'I'll try and sing a verse, / Or two, on the topics of the day, / And tell you what I think is wrong. / And what I think's fairplay, / There's such funny thing accours, / Now a day's that fill me with surprise.' The text beneath the title reads: 'Wretten Composed and Sung by WILFORD TAYLOR, Comedian and Vocalist with emmense success, [Strictly Copyright,]'. The broadside was published by the Poet's Box, Overgate, Dundee.

My Husband has no Courage in him and The Souldiers Reel
The first ballad begins: 'INTO a morning as I went abroad / even for to see the Flowers a springing, / In ever bush there sate a Bird, / changing their notes were sweetly singing.' The text preceeding it reads: 'A / Rare new Ballad / Entituled / My Husband has no courage in Him / To its own proper Tune.'

My lad your Mother's dead
This ballad begins: 'A soldier he returned again, / Back from a foreign shore, / He longed to see those loving ones, / For them he did adore.' The text preceding it reads: 'This Popular Song, can always be had the Poet's Box, / 190 and 192 Overgste, Dundee.'

My Love She is the Ring-leader
This ballad is comprised of two parts. The opening line of the first part reads: 'ALL ye who do desire to write'. In the second part of the ballad, the opening line is: 'Nature hath strain'd her utmost skill'. Below the title, there is a note stating that the ballad should be sung to a tune called 'My Love's a handsome shoe-maker'. This sheet was printed by John Reid of Pearson Cross, Edinburgh, in 1720.

My Lovely Lowland Caroline
Verse 1: 'Soft rolls Clyde's bonny silver stream, / Blow gentle breezes o'er yon lawn, / Bright Phoebus with his golden beams, / May cheer the birds while I do mourn. / The damask rose so bonny blows, / And honeysuckles may entwine, / Yet all are adding to my woes - / I've lost my lowland Caroline.' This sheet was published by James Lindsay of Glasgow but is not dated.

My Maggie she can wash
This ballad begins: 'Noo, I am a simple chappie and plainly you may see, / I have settled doon in to this toon, and would you credit me, / I have married got, it was my lot, I have got a decent.'

My Nancy
This ballad begins: 'Tho' I'm laid up in port, and not outward bound, / In my upper works nothing is ailing; / My rudder and compass are both safe and sound, / And when called on I'm ready for sailing.' A note below the title states that 'Copies of this popular song can always be had in the Poet's Box', and that the ballad should be sung to an original tune. The sheet was printed on Saturday the 6th of August, 1870, and cost one penny.

My Nannie's Awa
Verse 1: 'Now in her green mantle blythe nature arrays, / And listen the lambkins that bleat owre the braes, / While birds warble welcome in ilka green shaw; / But to me its delightless - my Nannie's awa''. This sheet was published by James Lindsay of 11 King Street, Glasgow.

My Nannie's Awa and Burns and his Highland Mary
'My Nannie's Awa'' begins: 'Now in her green mantle blythe Nature arrays, / And listen the lambkins that bleat owre the braes'. 'Burns and his Highland Mary' begins: 'In green Caledonia there ne'er were twa lovers, / Sae enraptured and happy in each ithers arms'. This broadside was published by James Lindsay of King Street in Glasgow. It does not carry a price or a date of publication.

My Own Mountain Home
This ballad begins: 'Though far from thee, my mountain home, / my mountain home I love thee still, / As when my light steps were wont to roam, / To wander o'er my native hill, / I'll ne'er forget the happy lays, / Sung at evening's welcome hour, / Now the thought of Childhood's days, / Sheds a soft and soothing power.'

Nell Flaherty's Drake
This ballad begins: 'My name it is Nell, quite candid I tell, / And I live near Coothill I will never deny, / I had a large drake, the truth for to speak, / That my grandmother left me and she going to die.'

Nelly Ray
Verse 1: 'I love a little country queen, a village beauty rare, / With rosy cheeks, white pearly teeth and lovely nut-brown air; / Her waist is so slender, and her feet are sosmall, / Of all the girls I ever loved, my Nelly beats them all.'

Nether Mill Glen
Verse 1: 'I've wandered my ain native isle, Caledonia, / O'er moor and o'er mountain, through valley and fen, / But nae pleasure like those at the clear crystal fountain, / By the banks o' the Forth, in sweet Nether Mill Glen.' This ballad was to be sung to the tune 'Garland of Love', and was written by James Niven, author of 'Kinninie Braes'.

New Ballad
This ballad begins: 'INto the month of March, / As I went to the North, / Beyond the Carnemont. / Far beyond Tay and Forth.' The text preceeding it reads: 'THE NEVV BALLAD. / OF THE LASS OF PEATIES MILL. / To its own Proper Tune.'

Results page:   1     2     3     4     5     6     7     8     9     10     11     12     13     14     15     16     17     18     19     20     21     22     23     24     25     26     27     28     29     30     31

 

Return to Search page