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Your search for ballad returned 911 broadsides

Displaying broadsides 541 to 570 of 911:

Margaret and the Minister, A True Tale
This ballad begins: 'A douse, religious kintry wife, / That liv'd a quiet, contented life, / To show respect unto the priest / Wham she esteemed within her breast'. It is dated 'Saturday morning, July 15, 1871'. A note under the title informs the reader that 'Copies can always be had in the POET'S BOX, 80 London Street, Glasgow'.

Margaret Bell's Lament
Verse 1: 'ADIEU unto Barrhead, and to Neilston also, / Where the river Levern it sweetly does flow, / My poor aged mother, for ever farewell, / An exile for life is your poor Margaret Bell.' The broadside was published by James Lindsay of King Street in Glasgow. It is not dated.

Margaret Bell's Lament
Verse 1: 'Adieu unto Barrhead, and to Neilston also, / Where the river Levern it sweetly does flow, / My poor aged mother, for ever farewell, / An exile for life is your poor Margaret Bell.' This ballad is to be sung to the tune of 'Braes of Strathblane'. It was published by Brown and Son, of 56 Trongate and 25 Nelson Street, Glasgow. A woodcut of the Ark adorns the top of the sheet.

Mary Le More
This ballad begins: 'As I stray'd o'er the common on Cork's rugged border, / While the dew-drops of morn the sweet primrose array'd, / I saw a poor female, whose mental disorder / Her quick-glancing eye and wild aspect betray'd.' It was published by Robert McIntosh of King Street, Calton, Glasgow, and includes an illustration at the top of the sheet.

Mary Mackree
Verse 1: 'In a small country cottage by the side of a moor, / Oh there lived one Mary Mackree, / And she kept the sign of the Bell and the Boar, / And very good liquor sold she. / Mary being old, scare could hobble about, / She kept a servant girl to serve the liquor out, / As bonny a lass as ever you did see, /Sold ale to the customers of Mary Mackree.'

Mary MacKree
Verse 1 begins: 'In a small country cottage by the side of a moor, / Oh there lived one Mary Mackree'. There is a note included which reads 'See 11', although there is no context given to this comment. A woodcut of the torso and head of a young highland lady has been included at the top of the sheet.

Mary Neil
Verse 1 begins: 'I am a bold undaunted youth my name is John M'Cann, / I am a native of Donegal, was bred near sweet Strabane'. This sheet was published by James Lindsay of 11 King Street, Glasgow (1860-90).

Mary, the Maid of the Don
Verse 1 begins: 'On the banks of the Don where I wandered with pleasure, / Where life's smiling visage invites me to roam'. There are no publication details attached to this sheet, but a woodcut illustration has been included at the top of the sheet. It shows a young fishwife, standing on a beach, with her nets.

Mary, the Maid of the Inn
Verse 1: 'Who is she, the poor maniac, whose wildly fix'd eyes / Seem a heart overcharg'd to express? - / She weeps not, yet often and deeply she sighs; / She never complains; but silence implies / The composure of settled distress.' This poem was published on 3rd July 1869 by the Poet's Box in Glasgow, priced one penny. At the foot of the sheet it is noted 'The POET is universally admitted to be the cheapest LETTERPRESS PRINTER in the city'. The 'POET' is not named.

Mary's Dream
This ballad begins: 'The moon had climbed the highest hill, / That rises o'er the source of Dee; / And from the eastern summit shed / Her silvery light on tower and tree'. A woodcut of a young woman holding aloft a birdcage whilst being looked at by an unusually large cat (or strangely shaped dog) decorates the top of the sheet. The sheet was published by James Lindsay of 11 King Street, Glasgow.

Mashers of Ramsey's Pend
Verse 1: 'We'll sing you a song, and it wont be long, / If you listen to what we say / It's about two girls you know very well / And they live straight over the way. / There cheeks are as red as a piece of white chalk, / And they wear a Grecian bend; There's no mistake about it, / They're the mashers of Ramsey's Pend.' This song was published by the Poet's Box, 224 Overgate, Dundee.

Massacre of Glencoe
This ballad begins: 'O! dark lowr'd the night on the wild distant heath; / And the wild raven croak'd out the bodings of death; / While the mood hid her beams in the clouds out o' woe, / Disdaining to gaze on the fields of Glencoe'. It was published by James Lindsay, 9 King Street, Glasgow, and includes a woodcut illustration.

Massacre of Macpherson
Verse 1 and chorus: 'Fhairson swore a feud against the clan Mactavish, / Marched into their land to murder and to ravish, / For he did resolve to extirpate the vipers, / With four and twenty men and five and thirty pipers. / Too ran ach a' be, / Dal a gee a sorus, / Come a' rach an tuch, / And that's a Gaelic chorus'. This ballad was to be sung to an 'Original' tune. The broadside was priced at one penny and published by the Poet's Box in Glasgow. At the foot of the sheet is a 'List of Newest Songs and Recitations' available from the publisher.

McGorran's Lament
This ballad begins: 'Good people give attention / To those truths I herewith mention, / And pour in full extension / Your sympathy to me.' It was published by James Lindsay of 9 King Street, Glasgow, and probably sold for one penny.

Meal Mongers Garland
This ballad is divided into two named parts. The first part of the ballad is called 'The Meal Mongers intreagues and Resolutions', while the second half of the ballad is called 'The Buyers Answer'. The opening line of the first part reads: 'COME Willie I'll tell you the news'. In the second part of the ballad, the opening line is: 'Fire Brands of Satan are you then Resolv'd'. The first part of the ballad was sung to the tune of 'The meal was dear short-fine', while the second part of the ballad is sung to the tune of 'Death and the Lady'.

Meditations of a Coal Horse at a Toll Bar
This ballad begins: 'O SIRS, and maun I stand and chitter / A' nicht aneath the blast sae bitter'. This poem was, allegedly, written by 'A four-footed tee-totaller'.

Meet Me by Moonlight Alone
Verse 1: 'Meet me by moonlight alone, / And then I will tell you a tale, / Must be told by the moonlight alone, / In the grove at the end of the vale. / You must promise to come for I said / I would show the night flowers their queen; / Nay, turn not away thy sweet head, / 'Tis the loveliest ever was seen. / O meet me by moonlight alone.' This song was published by the Poet's Box, Overgate, Dundee, and priced at one penny.

Meet Me on the Gowan Lea
Chorus: 'Meet me on the gowan lea, / Bonnie Mary, sweetest Mary; / Meet me on the gowan lea, / My ain, my artless Mary.' Verse 1: 'Before the sun sinks in the west, / And nature a' hae gane to rest; / There to my faithfu' bosom press'd / O let me clasp my Mary.' This sheet carries no publication details.

Merry Bagpipes
This ballad begins: 'A Shepherd sat him under a Thorn, / he pull'd out his Pipe and began for to play, / It was on a Mid Summers day in the morn, / for honour of that Holy day.' The text preceeding it reads: 'Or, the Pleasant Pastime betwxt a Jolly Shepherd and a Country Damsel, on a Mid-Summer-Day, in the Morning. / To the tune of March Boyes, &c. Licensed according to Order.'

Merry Dialogue, in the Tolbuith of Edinburgh; Betwixt Tonny Ashton, and John Curry
Verse 1: 'Tonny. / COME, my couragious Jack, my metl'd Scot; / Why may'nt we kindle Kindness with a Pot, / Yow've run the Ghent-loup, and yow've try'd the Tron, / Your suffrings are expir'd, when mine comes on'. A handwritten annotation at the foot of the broadside suggested that it was published in Edinburgh on the 16th of April 1728. The price and publisher are not noted.

Milking Pail and Nancies Unkindness to her Lover
Verse 1: 'Ye Nimphs and Silvian Gods, / That Love green Feilds and Woods, / When spring newly Born herself does Adorn / With Flowers and Blooming Budes; / Come singing the Praise, while Flooks does graze / in yonder pleasant Vail: / Or these that choose their Sleep to loose / And in Cold goes with clouted Shoes, / To carry the Milking Pail.' The ballad was to be sung 'To an excellent New Tune, much in request'.

Miss Hooligan's Christmas Cake
Verse 1: 'As I sat at my windy one evening, / The letter man brought unto me / A little gilt edged invitation, / Saying, Gilhooly, come over to tea. / Sure I knew that the Hooligans sent it, / So I went just for old friendship's sake, / And the first thing they gave me to tackle / Was a piece of Miss Hooligan's cake.' The text beneath the title reads: 'Sung by Harry Melville and J.M. Oates with success.' The song was published by the Poet's Box, 10 Hunter Street, Dundee, priced one penny.

Moderate Man's Advice against Extravagant Drinking; or, Enough is as Good as a Feast
Verse 1: 'Come all you brave hearts of Gold, / let's learn to be merry and wise / For it is a true saying of old, / Suspicion is doubtless disguis'd: / Whatever we say or do, / Let's not drink to disturb our brain; / But laugh for an hour or two, / And never be Drunk again.' This ballad was to be sung 'To an Excellent New Tune', and was published by John Moncur of Sclater's Close, Edinburgh, in 1707.

Money
This ballad begins: ''Tis mony makes the mair to go is a saying old and true / And when you've go the ready cash, friends will stick like glue, / But when your purse is empty, those friends you thought sincere, / Will proudly turn upon their heels and quickly disapper.' A note below the title states that this ballad was 'Sung by Harry Russell, with great success', and that 'Copies of this popular song can always be had at the POET'S BOX, Overgaie, Dundee'.

Monk and the Miller's Wife; Or, A' Parties Pleased
Verse 1 begins: 'Now lend your lugs, ye benders fine, / Wha ken the benefit of wine; / And you wha laughing feud brown ale, / Leave jinks a wee and hear a tale'. This sheet was published on Saturday 15th July, 1871, by the Poet's Box. It would have cost a penny to buy.

Monmouth And Bucleugh's Welcome from the North: or the Loyal Protestants Joy for his Happy Return
This ballad begins: 'When stout young Jemmy went abroad / To fee the Northen Races / He met ten Thousands in the Road, / That swore they were his Graces.' A note below the title states that this ballad should be sung to the tune of 'York and Albany's Welcome to England', this being a reference to James the Duke of York, brother of King Charles II.

Moon is Out Tonight Love and Mother Take Me Home Again
The first verse of 'THE MOON is out to-night Love OR, SWEET KITTY OF THE GLEN!' begins: 'THE moon is out to-night love, / Floating thro' the sky, / Little stars are laughing, As she passes by'. The chorus begins: 'The moon is out to-night love, / Meet me with a smile'. The broadside is decorated with sun motifs.

Morag's Fary Glen
Verse 1: 'Ye ken whar you wee burnie, love, / Rins roarin' to the sea ; / And tumbles o'er its rocky beds, Like spirits wild and free. The mellow maves tunes his lay, / The blackbird swells his not ; / And little robin sweetly sings, / Above the woody grot.' The ballad was published by the Poet's Box of Dundee.

Mother of Jealousie; or, The Husband's Lament, that he should part with his Wife by reason of her Jealousie of him
Verse 1: 'WHen my dearest Dear did first appear, / I bless'd the time that I had found her: / Her beauty did my Heart inchear, / But now alas we two must sinder!' This should be sung 'To the Tune of Wo's my Heart that we should sinder'. Here 'sinder' is the poet's or printer's orthography for sunder, meaning to part.

Mother's Magpie
Verse 1: 'HE. One day while working at the plough, / Fal, lal, &c. / I felt just here I can't tell how, / Fal, lal, &c. / I turned my head round, just to see / who 'twas I heard, when there stood thee, / Like Venus com'd out of the Sea. / Fal, lal, &c.' This ballad was to be sung to the tune 'Blue Tailed Fly'.

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