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Your search for ballad returned 911 broadsides

Displaying broadsides 361 to 390 of 911:

Hansel Poem of the Deliverers of the Mid-Lothian Advertiser
Verse 1: 'Respectit Freen's, baith great an' sma', / In hamely rhyme we greet ye a', / Sincerely hopin' Sixty-twa, / Whan dead an' gane, / May leave within ilk hoose an' ha' / Nae grief or pain.' The authorship of the poem is credited to 'one of themselves', 'themselves' being a reference to the 'Deliverers' of the title. The sheet carries no publication details.

Hare's Dream!
The ballad begins: 'Good people all give ear to what I say, / 'Twill make your very blood run cold, / And fill you with dread dismay, / When the truth to you I've told.' This broadside was priced at one penny. The sheet has had two related articles pasted to it. One is an advertisement for a full report of the trial of William Burke and Helen McDougal, for the murder of Margery Campbell. The other is a short report from the Edinburgh Evening Post claiming that 'investigation into the late criminal transactions has been renewed'.

Harp of Caledonia
Verse 1: 'WHEN Scotia tun'd her rustic lyre, / And bad her sons to fame aspire, / To touch wi' nature's glowan fire, / The harp of Caledonia.' This sheet was published by Carse of 36 Prince's Street, Glasgow.

Harp That Once Through Tara's Halls
This ballad begins: 'The harp that once through Tara's hall / The sound of music shed, / Now hangs as mute on Tara's walls, / As if that soul were fled.' It was published in 1875, by the Poet's Box of 80 London Street, Glasgow. The address has been partially obscured - possibly the publisher went into liquidation or moved premises.

Harper o' Mull
Verse 1: 'WHEN Rosie was faithful, how happy was I, / Still gladsome as simmer the time glided by, / I play'd my harp cheery, while fondly I sang, / Of the charms of my Rosie the winter nights lang; / But now I'm as wofu' as wofu' can be, / Come simmer, come winter, tis a' ane to me; / For the dark gloom of falsehood sae clouds my sad soul, / That cheerless for ay is the Harper o' Mull.' The sheet carries no publication details.

Hatton Woods or The Bonnie Woods o' Hatton
Verse 1: 'Ye comrades and companions, and all ye females dear, / To my sad lamentations, I pray you lend an ear ; / There was once I lo'ed a bonnie lass, I lo'ed her as my life, / And it was my whole intention to make her my wedded wife.' This sheet was published by the Poet's Box of the Overgate, Dundee.

Haughs o' Crumdel
This ballad begins: 'As I came in by Auchendown, / A little wee bit frae the town, / Unto the Highlands I was bound / To view the Haughs of Crumdel.' The publisher and date of publication are unknown, but the number 79 in the bottom right corner suggests it is part of a sequence. A 'haugh' is a low-lying piece of ground.

Heather Jock
The first verse begins: 'Heather Jock was stark and grim, / Faught wi' a' would fecht wi' him; / Swauk and supple, sharp and thin, / Fine for gaun against the win''. 'Swack' in this instance probably means 'nimble' or 'agile'. The chorus reads: 'Heather Jock's noo awa, / Heather Jock's noo awa, / The muircock noo may crously craw, / Since Heather Jock's noo awa.' 'Crously' is Scots for 'proudly' or 'boldly'.

Heather Jock
This ballad begins with the chorus: 'Heather Jock's noo awa, / Heather Jock's noo awa, / The muircock noo may crousely craw, / Since Heather Jock's noo awa.' The opening line of verse one reads: 'Heather Jock was stark and grim'.

Here's a Health to Aytoun!
Verse 1: 'Here's a health to Aytoun, / Health and wealth to Aytoun; / He's the man we understan'- / Here's success to Aytoun!' The text preceding this reads: 'A New Song. / TUNE. - Carle an' the King come.' There is a woodcut illustration of two men sitting beside a huge alcohol barrel in a cellar.

Here's a Health to Aytoun, a New Song
This political ballad begins: 'The Tories they have had their day / The lang-tongued Whigs have had their say'. The chorus begins: 'Here's a Health to Aytoun, / Health and wealth to Aytoun'. A note below the title states that the ballad should be sung to the tune 'Carle an' the King Come'. Although there are no publication details included on this sheet, the reference to Jamie Aytoun suggests that it was most likely published in Edinburgh during the 1830s.

He's or'e the Hills and Far Away
Verse 1: 'I Must or'e Lands and Seas repass, / Face Summers Suns and Winters glass, / Rude Hurry Canes I must endure, / Never wake, nor Sleep, nor rest Secure, / Where Savage Moors makes their abode / And Humane Foot have never trode; / There I perhaps whole years must stay / While she I love is far away.' The ballad was to be sung 'To its Own Proper Tune'.

Highland Laddie
Verse 1: 'The Lawland Lads think they are fine, / But O they're vain and idly gawdy, / How much unlike that graceful Mien, / and manly Looks of my Highland Laddie: / O my bonny Highland Laddie, / my handsome smiling Highland Laddie / may Heav'n still guard and love reward, / the Lawland Lass and her Highland Laddie.' The text below the title reads 'Set by Mar Arne and Sung by Mt Mattocks at the Theatre RL. In Drury Lane'.

Highland Man's Lament
Verse 1: 'Tonald Bayn, her nane dear Shoy, / Maks a' Folk sad save Robin Roy / Who kend him sin he was a Boy, / her nane sell Swons, / To think he'd hangs like Gilderoy, by Loulan Louns.' The lament is 'For the Death of Donald Bayn, alias M'evan Vanifranck, who was Execute in the Grass Market of Edinburgh, on Wednesday the 9th Day of January 1723' and added in pencil: ['For Robbery he dyed denying most of the crimes he was condemned for'].

Highland Mary
The text preceeding this ballad begins: 'The "Castle of Montgomery" referred to in this beautiful effusion was that of Collsfield, near Tarbolton.' The ballad itself begins: 'Ye banks and braes and streams around / The Castle o' Montgomery'. A nicely executed woodcut representing a rather well-dressed Highland Mary decorates the top of the sheet.

Highland Minstrel Boy
Verse 1: 'I hae wander'd mony a night in June / Along the bank's o' Clyde, / Beneath a bright and bonnie moon, / Wi' Mary by my side; / A summer was she to my e'e, / And to my heart a joy, / And weel she lo'ed to roam wi' me, / Her Highland Minstrel Boy, / I hae wander'd, &c.'

Highland Soldier
Verse 1: 'Owre yon hills not far awa, / There dwells a lovely maiden, / As she strolled, ae simmer's night / For to view the soldiers paradin'.' Below the title we are told that 'This popular song can always be had at the Poet's Box, 224 Overgate, Dundee'.

Highlander's Adventures in Glasgow Fair
Verse 1: 'Her nainsel cam to the Lowland town to see the fair and thrang man, / Before she walk'd the city round, she got mony a squeeze and bang, man, / But she'll awa down by the auld brig, bear to the Broomi law, man, / The lads kick'd up the funniest rig, the like you never saw, man.' 'Nainsel' is a nickname for a Highlander, and means 'one's own self'. Unfortunately, no publication details are included on the sheet.

His Grace the Great Duke of Argyl's Welcom to Scotland
This 14-stanza song, to be sung to the tune of 'The drums and the Trumpets Commands Me from Shoar', begins: 'SCOTLAND Rejoyce, with a chearfull Smile / and Drink a full Flass to the Duke ARGYLE / He Feights for our Church and Cause to maintain, / The Clouds is despel'd he's in Scotland again.' No publication details are given.

Home, Dearie, Home, He was only a Private Soldier and Hunting Tower, Or, When Ye Gang Awa' Jamie
The first ballad begins: 'A beauteous fair damsel in London did dwell, / A young man fell in love with her as some people tell'.
The second ballad begins: 'He was only a private soldier - / One of the rank and file'.
The third ballad begins: 'When ye gang awa' Jamie, / Far across the sea, laddie'.

Honest Jemmy Ayton
This ballad begins: 'The Whigs are vaporing thro the town, / That Frank, the Barber's coming down, / (The doited, petted, grabby loon) / To put out Jemmy Ayton.' The text preceeding it reads: 'A NEW REFORM SONG. / AIR- 'The King of the Cannibal Islands'.'

Honest Jemmy Ayton
This ballad begins: 'The Whigs are vapouring thro the town, / That Frank, the Barber's * coming down, / (The doited, petted, gabby loon) / To put out Jemmy Ayton.' A note below the title states that this ballad is 'A NEW REFORM SONG', and should be sung to the air, 'The King of the Cannibal Islands'. Unfortunately, no publication details are included on the broadside. However, the reference to Francis Jeffrey (founder and editor of 'the Edinburgh Review') at the foot of the sheet, suggests that it was most likely published in the 1820s or 1830s.

Honest Jemmy Ayton, A New Reform Song
This ballad (sung to the air, 'The King of the Cannibal Islands') begins: 'The Whigs are vapouring thro' the town, / That Frank, the Barber's coming down, / (The doited, petted, gabby loon) / To put out Jemmy Ayton.' It is decorated with a woodcut illustration, which incorporates the motto 'ENGLAND EXPECTS EVERY MAN TO DO HIS DUTY' - famously signalled by Nelson at the Battle of Trafalgar.

Hope Farewel, Adieu to all Pleasure, or Silvia's Matchless Cruelty
This ballad begins: 'Hope farewel, adieu to all Pleasure, / No Torment so great as Love in despair: / Sylvia frowns, my Endeavours to please her, / And laughs at those pains she makes me to bear.' A generic woodcut has been included to add to the market appeal of the sheet. This broadside ballad should be sung to the tune of 'Hail great Sir, &c'. It was probably printed by John Reid in Edinburgh.

Horse Chestnut and a Chestnut Horse
This ballad begins: 'An Eton stripling, training for the law, / A dunce at syntax - but a dab at taw, / One happy Chirtmas laid upion the shelf, / His cap and gown and store of learned pelf'. 'Taw' is a game of marbles and 'pelf' means 'riches' or 'booty'. The publisher of the broadside was the Poet's Box, but the town of publication has been obscured. The sheet was published on Saturday, 28th January 1871, and was priced at one penny.

Hot Ashfelt!
This ballad begins: 'Good evening to ye, Glasgow boys, I'm glad to see ye well, / I'm consaytier myself tonight than any tongue can tell, / For I'm in a situation - oh, begor! a fancy job, / N'hye, an' whisper, I've a weekly wage of fifteen bob.'

Hungry Army
This ballad begins: 'The wind in thundering gales did roar / As I left home in black October, / The hail and rain in torrents came, / And the world I thought was surely over.' There are no publication details given, but this is one of two songs - printed by James Lindsay - on this sheet.

Huy and Cry After Sir John Barlycorn
This ballad begins: 'WE all the Drunkards of the Nation, / Issue Our Royal Proclamation / To you great King at Arms, the Lion, / (Since every Liedge thro' drought is dying;) / With all your bretheren, Heraulds too, / And Pursuevants, that follow you.'

Huzza for Honest Aytoun
This ballad begins: 'The Whigs are vap'ring through the toun, / Wi' Campbell, counsel o' the Croun- / As if a Lunnon lawyer loon / Could ere compete wi' Aytoun!' It was advertised as a new song and was to be sung to the tune, 'The auld wife ayont the fire'. A woodcut illustration of a rather dubious-looking character adorns the top of the sheet.

Huzza for Honest Aytoun!
This political ballad begins: 'THE Whigs are vap'ring through the toun, / Wi' Campbell, counsel of the croun - / As is a lunnun lawyer loon, / Could ere compete wi' Aytoun!' A note below the title states that this is a new song, and should be sung to the tune, 'The auld wife ayont the fire'. While there are no publication details included on this sheet, the reference to Jamie Aytoun suggests that it was almost certainly published in Edinburgh during the 1830s.

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