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Your search for courtship returned 233 broadsides

Displaying broadsides 31 to 60 of 233:

Bonnie Lass o' Broughty Ferry
Verse 1: 'A something's birrin through my head, / An' at my heart's a hurlie burlie; / At times I think I'm halflins dead, / An' whiles I laugh an' whiles I'm sury. / I kenna fu' to gie't a name, / That's dung me in this tirrie-wirrie; / Gin it be love, she's a' the blame - / The Bonnie lass o' Boughty Ferry'. The broadside was published by the Poet's Box, Overgate, Dundee, and at the foot of the page, we learn that the publisher also runs a postal service for songs.

Bonnie Lass That Would Lie in a Barrack
Verse 1 begins: 'O say bonnie lass will ye lie in a barrack, / And marry a sodger, and carry his wallet?' There is an address to the reader at the beginning of the song, which comments on the plight and prettiness of soldiers' wives. There is also a pro-Scots coat-of-arms included at the top of the page.

Bonnie Lasses' Answer
Verse 1 begins: 'Farewell to Glasgow, / Likewise to Lanarkshire, / And farewell my dearest parents, / For I'll ne'er see you mair'. This sheet was published by James Lindsay of 11 King Street, Glasgow. The woodcut at the top of the sheet depicts a small town with three women standing talking together in the street.

Bonnie Lassie's Answer
Verse 1: 'Farewell to Glasgow, / Likewise to Lanarkshire, / And farewell my dearest parents, / For I'll never see you mair; / For the want of pocket money, / And for the want of cash, / Makes mony a bonny laddie, / to leave his bonny lass.' The chorus begins: 'For I am forced to go, my love / Where no one shall me know'. Included at the top of the sheet is a woodcut illustration of a man and woman holding hands. The word 'Kangaroo' is from the title of another ballad that appeared on the same sheet: 'On Board the Kangaroo'.

Bonnie Lassie's Answer
Verse 1: 'Farewell to Glasgow, / Likewise to Lanarkshire, / And farewell my dearest parents, / For I'll never see you mair; / For the want of pocket money, / And for the want of cash, / Makes mony a bonny laddie, / to leave his bonny lass.'

Bonnie Lizie Balie
This ballad begins: 'It fell about the Lambmass Tide, / When the Leaves were fresh & green, / Lizie Bailie is to Gartartain / to see her Sister Jean. / She had not been in Gartartain, / even but a little while, / Till Luck and Fortune happn'd her, / and she went to the Isle.' This was a popular ballad, first published as a broadside but later collected in 'Herd's Ancient and Modern Songs' in 1776.

Bonnie Nelly Brown
This ballad begins: 'O bonnie Nelly Brown, / I will sing a sang to thee, / Though oceans wide between us row, / Ye'll aye be dear to me.' The text preceeding it reads: 'This Popular Song can always be had at the Poet's Box, / Overgate Dundee.'

Bonny Aberdonian; or, Marry an Aberdonian
Verse 1: 'Now I've been looking up and doun / For months, I'm sure, about this toun, / A thrifty wife my joys to croon - / But I'll no say I'll take ony ane. / O' a' the places I ha'e seen / In different places I ha'e been, / Nae damsel pleases my twa een / Like a strapping Aberdonian.' This song was supplied by the Poet's Box. The town or city is not specified, but it was probably published in Dundee.

Bonny Bruicked Lassie she's Blew Beneath the Eye
This ballad begins: 'Down by yon River side, / where early falls the Dew, / Betwixt my Love and I, / there were kind Kisses anew.'

Bonny Dundee
Verse 1: 'I who was once a day Courted by many, / Now am most scornfully Slighted by thee; / Others some reason had, thou ner'e had any, / Returning with Disdain my Court[e]sie: Slave to Affection and thy sweet Complection, / Thus far have I been but no longer shall be; / A rash Election, goes not by Direction, / Of the weak Feminine Amorous we.'

Bonny Gray-ey'd Morn; or, Jockie Rouz'd with Love
This ballad begins: 'THe bonny Gray-ey'd Morn began for to peep / when Jockie rouz'd with Love came blithly on; / And I who wishing lay depriv'd of Sleep, / abhor'd the lazy hours that flow did run.' It was to be sung 'To an excellent new Tune'.

Bonny Helen
This ballad begins: 'ON Atrick side in Yarrow, / a place pleasant and fair, / I thought on bonny Helen'. The text preceeding this ballad reads: 'A New Song. / To the Tune of the Yellow Haird Ladie.'

Bonny Lad of High Renown
This ballad begins: 'Whom to shall I make my Adress? / or whom to shall I mak my Moan? / the bonny Lad that I Lov'd best, / an other is come and tane him me from.' The text preceeding it reads: 'An Excellent New Song / INTITULED / A Bonny LAD of High Renown / To its own proper Tune.'

Bonny Lass of Branksome
This ballad begins: 'As I came in by Tiviot side / and by the braes of Branksome, / There met I with a pretty Lass, / that was both neat and handsome: / If that her mother say me nay / then with the Daughter will I play, / Whether that she will or nay / have at the bonny Lassie.'

Bonny Mary of Argyle
This ballad begins: 'I have heard the mavis singing, / Its love song to the morn, / I have seen the dew-drop clinging / To the rose just newly born'. The sheet was published by James Lindsay of 11 King Street, Glasgow. A woodcut of a woman walking along a country lane carrying a basket in each arm and a birdcage on her head, decorates the top of the sheet.

Bonny Mary of Argyle
Verse 1 begins: 'I have heard the mavis singing / Its love song to the morn'. This sheet was published by James Lindsay of 11 King Street, Glasgow. Included above the title is a clear and detailed image of country girl crossing a stream.

Bonny Moon
This ballad begins: 'As I went out to my cot, at the close of the day, / About the beginning of June, / By a jessamine shade, I spy'd a fair maid, / And she sadly complain'd to the moon.' It was printed by T. Birt of Great St Andrew Street, London, and includes an advertisement.

Bonny Nelly Brown
Verse 1: 'Bonny Nelly Brown, I will sing a song to thee, / Tho' oceans wide between us roar, ye'll aye be dear to me, / Tho' mony a year's gane o'er my head, since down in Linton's dell, / I took my last fond look o' thee, my ain dear Nell.'

Bra' Lass Will Ye Gang to North Highlands, Wi' Me
The ballad begins: 'It is down in yon meadow, and there I did see. / A bonnie wee lassie that dazzled my Eee'. The woodcut at the top of this sheet is unusually detailed and expressive for broadside publications. A uniformed man is kneeling at the feet of a well-dressed and veiled woman, both characters appear to be in emotional turmoil.

Braes o' Gleniffer and Henry and Nancy, or, The Lover's Separation
'The Braes o' Gleniffer' begins: 'KEEN blaws the wind, / O'er the braes O' Gleniffer'. 'Henry and Nancy' begins: 'As I walked out one morning in the spring time of the year, / I overheard a sailor bold, likewise a lady fair'. The sheet was published by Harkness of Church Street in Preston. The author of 'The Braes o' Gleniffer' is given as Tannahill.

Braes of Birnibouzle
This ballad begins: 'WILL ye gang wi' me Lassie, / To the braes of Birnibouzle / Baith the earth and sea Lassie / Will I rob to feed thee / I'll hunt the otter and the brook'. It was published by J. Pitts of Great St Andrew Street, possibly London, and includes a woodcut illustration of a well-dressed man standing next to a window.

Braes of Strathblane
Verse 1 begins: 'As I went a walking one morning in May, / Down by yon green meadows I carelessly did stray'. There is a woodcut included above the song which features a happy young couple, quite sprucely dressed, talking together. There are no publication details given, but this is one of two songs - printed by James Lindsay - on this sheet.

Bridgeton Tragedy
This ballad begins: 'Good people all of Glasgow, pray listen unto me, / Whilst I relate this woeful tale and mournful tragedy; / 'Tis of a fair and handsome girl, in Bridgeton she did dwell, / She was her parents sole delight, her comrades loved her well.' It was advertised as a new song and includes a woodcut illustration of a small leprechaun-like figure reading a book.

Burns and Highland Mary
This ballad begins: 'In green Caledonia there ne'er were two lovers, / Sae enraptured and happy in each others arms, / As Burns the sweet bard and his dear Highland Mary, / And fondly and sweetly he sang of her charms.' A note at the foot of this sheet states it was published by 'Moore, Printer, Cheapside, Belfast'.

Burns and his Highland Mary
This ballad begins: 'IN green Caledonia there ne'er were twa lovers, / Sae enraptured and happy in each ither's arms ; / As Burns the sweet bard, and his dear Highland Mary.' Included at the top of the sheet is a small illustration of a lyre surrounded by foliage and musical notation.

Burns and his Highland Mary and Gae Bring tae me a Pint o' Wine
The first of these pieces begins: 'In green Caledonia there ne'er were twa lovers / Sae enraptured and happy in each ither's arms, / As Burns the sweet bard and his dear Highland Mary / And fondly and sweetly he sang o' her charms.' A simple woodcut of three children sitting on a fence decorates the top of the sheet.

Buudle [Bundle] an' Go
Verse 1 begins: 'Clyde's bonny hills whar the heather was blooming / An' laddies and lassies lang lo' a' the day'. This sheet is numbered 35 in the publisher's sequence. There are no publication details given, but this is one of two songs - printed by James Lindsay - on this sheet.

Caledonain Laddie and Sich a Getting Up Stairs
'The Caledonian Laddie' begins: 'Blythe Sandy is a bonny boy, And always is a wooing, O, / He is e'er so bold and kind, / Although he is a wooing, O!' 'Sich a Getting Up Stairs' begins: 'At Kentuck last night a party met, / Dey say dem going to hab a treat'. The sheet was published by J. Harkness of Church Street, Preston, and is illustrated with two woodcuts.

Captain Glen
Verse 1: 'As I was walking to take the air, / To see the ships all sailing O, / The sailors all invited me on board, / And the captain likewise to his cabin O.' There are no publication details given on this broadside.

Castle O' Montgomery
Verse 1: 'Ye banks, and braes, and streams around / The Castle o' Montgomery, / Green be your woods, and fair your flowers, / Your waters never drumlie! / There simmer first unfauld her robes, / And there they langest tarry; / For there I took the last fareweel / O' my sweet Highland Mary.' This broadside was published by J. Scott of Pittenweem in Fife, and sold by J. Wood of 49 North Richmond Street in Edinburgh.

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