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Your search for ballad returned 911 broadsides

Displaying broadsides 241 to 270 of 911:

Dialogue between ald John M'Clatchy and Young Willie Ha
This ballad begins: ' THE Meal was dear short shine, / When they were Married together, / Ann Maggy she was in her prime, / When Willy made Courtship till her. / Twa Pistols Charge'd be-guess, / To give the Courtier a Shot, / Ann fine came ban the Lass, / Wee Swats drawn frae the Butt?' This ballad was to be sung 'To an Excellent New Tune', which unfortunately is not given.

Dialogue Between Death and A Sinner
Verse 1 begins: 'DEATH: "O Sinner ! come by Heaven's decree, / My warrant is to summon thee'. It was supposedly composed by a Sunday school teacher. It was published by James Lindsay of 9 King Street, Glasgow (1852-59), and includes three woodcut illustrations along the top.

Dialogue between his Grace the Duke of Argyle and the Earl of Mar
This ballad begins: 'Argyle and Mar are gone to War / Which hath breed great Confusion / For Church & State they do debate / Through Difference and Division'. A note below the title states that this dialogue was to be sung to a tune called 'the Hare Merchants Rant, &c'. Unfortunately, no publication details are included on the sheet.

Dialogue Betwixt Satan and a Young Man
This ballad begins: SATAN. / WHat Haste! Young Man, why up so soon I' th' Morn? / YOUNG MAN. / My Work is great, and, to do it I'm Sworn. / SATAN. / It is too soon, ly down, and take thy Rest. / YOUNG MAN. / My Work is weighty, and I must not Jest.' The broadside was published in 1716 by John Reid of Pearson's Close in Edinburgh.

Diana Kitty Annie Maria
This ballad begins: ''Twas in the month of June, when the birds were in full tune, / I first met a charming little creature, / Hey eyes they shone as bright as the twinkling stars at night, / And a kind smile played on every feature.' A note below the title states that ' Copies of this highly popular song can only be had in the Poet's Box', and that the sheet cost one penny. A further note mentions that the ballad should be sung to an original tune.

Doctor and his Patients
This ballad begins: 'THERE was a prudent grave Physician, / Careful of Patients as you'd wish one; / Much Good he did with Purge and Glister, / And well he knew to raise a Blister; / Many he cur'd, and more he wou'd, / By Vomit, Flux, and letting Blood; / But still his Patients came again, / And most of their old Ills complain'.

Donald and his Mither
Verse 1: 'Come my lass and be nae blate, / And I will be your guard for ever, / And I will dwat you air and late, / And you'll sit beside young Donald's mither.' Chorus: 'Come awa' wi' me, lassie, / Come awa' wi' me lassie, / I'll row ye in my tartan plaid. / My lowland bride - my bonnie lassie.'

Donald Blue
Verse 1 begins: 'My names Donald Blue, you ken me fu' we'll / And if you be civil I'm a civel chiel'. There are no publication details attached to this sheet. A woodcut of two clasped hands has, however, been included above the title.

Donald o' Dundee
This ballad begins: 'Young Donald is the blythest lad, / That e'er made love to me ; / Whene're he's by my heart is glad, / He seems so gay and free'. The sheet was published by the Poet's Box, who operated out of 182 Overgate, Dundee.

Donald of Dundee
Verse 1 begins: 'YOUNG Donald is the blithest lad / That e'er made love to me'. It was published by Pitts of 6 Great St Andrew Street, London. Above the title a crude woodcut of a well-dressed lady holding a long curly wig has been included.

Donald's Farewell to Lochaber
Verse 1: 'Farewell to Lochaber, and farewell my Jean, / Where heartsome with thee I hae monie days been; / For Lochaber no more, Lochaber no more, / We'll maybe return to Lochaber no more.' Unfortunately, no publication details are included on the sheet.

Donald's Return to Glencoe
This ballad begins: 'As I was walking one evening of late, / When Flora's gay mantle the fields decorate, / I carelessly wandered where I did not know, / On the banks of a fountain that lies in Glencoe.' Two woodcut illustrations decorate this sheet, one of a man and a woman in a rural setting and the other of a young woman on her own.

Donald's Return To Glencoe and 'Scotland Yet
The first ballad begins: 'As I was walking one evening of late, / When Flora's green mantle the field decorate, / I carelessly wandered, where I did not know, / On the banks of a fountain that lies in Glencoe.' This sheet was published by James Lindsay of 11 King Street, Glasgow.

Donnelly and Cooper, Silver bells and Larboard Watch
The first ballad begins: 'Come all you true-born Irishmen wherever ye be, / I pray you give attention, and listen unto me'. This song is given the greatest space and boldest print on the sheet and so must have been given more precedence.

Don't Let Us Be Strangers
Verse 1: 'I hate to be unsociable with anyone I meet, / I like someone to chatter to me when I sit down to eat / And if I have to go by train a mile or two away, / Unto my fellow passenger I?m pretty sure to say . . .' Below the title we are told that, 'This popular song can always be had at the Poet's Box, 224 Overgate, Dundee'.

Don't Sit Down and Grumble
Verse 1: 'There's people in this world, who though, / Possessed of strength and health; / Will sit and sigh and grumble, / Because they have not wealth; / Instiad of trying to win it, / They're time they wile away, / When people such as these I meet, / To them these words I say.' This song was written, composed and sung by Tom Glen, and published by the Poet's Box, Overgate, Dundee.

Dooley Fitba' Club
This ballad begins: 'Noo ye a' ken my big brither Jock, / His richt name is Johnny Shaw, / We'll he's lately jined a fitba' club, / For he's daft aboot fitba'.' The text preceeding it reads: 'Written by JAMES CURRIN. Sung by J.C. M'Donald.' This sheet was published by the Poet's Box, Overgate, Dundee.

Dooley Fitba' Club
The first verse begins: 'Noo ye a' ken my big brither Jock, / His richt name is Johnny Shaw, / We'll he's lately jined a fitba' club, / For he's daft aboot fitba'. It was written by James Currin and sung by J.C. McDonald, and could be purchased from the Poet's Box, Overgate, Dundee.

Dorrn's Ass
Verse 1 begins: 'One Paddy Doyle lived near Killearney, / He courted a maid called Biddy Toole'.

Dowie Dens o' Yarrow
The first verse reads: 'Late at e'en, drinking the wine, / And ere they paid the lawing, / They set a combat them between, / To fight it in the dawing.' This broadside includes decorative detail around the title, and a small illustration of a sailing vessel after the last verse.

Downfall of Brigham Young
This ballad begins: 'Come listen now and you shall hear the news that came to hand, / Concerning Saint Brigham Young, that famous lady's man, / We're told that all the Mormons, and his bawling squalling band, / Will have for to skedaddle from the Yankee Doodle land . . . '

Downfall of the Dyke
This ballad begins: 'You've heard tell of this muckle dyke, / Built on the banks of Clyde, man, / That has near stood the 6th year's flood, / And Winter's storm beside, man'. It was published by William Carse of Glasgow and probably sold for one penny.

Dreadful Voice of Fire
This ballad begins: 'The Elements, Earth, Water, Air and Fire, / Make happy Men, or sometime they conspire.' The text preceeding this ballad reads: 'Begun at Edinburgh, the 3d of February 1700. ????? Quis, talia fando, / Temperet a Lachrymiss? ????'.

Drink and be Merry; or, The Bold 42!
Verse 1 and chrous: 'There was a puir lassie I pity her lot, / Her lad went and listed to wear the red coat, / To wear the red coat he has gaen faur awa', / Oh, my love's gone and listed in the bold forty-twa. / Let us drink and be merry / All sorrows refrain, / For we may and may never / All meet here again.' The broadside was published by The Poet's Box, 224 Overgate, Dundee, which advertises at the top of the sheet, 'NEW SONGS OUT EVERY WEEK', and at the bottom, 'Songs sent to any part of the country on receipt of postage stamps'.

Driven from Home
Verse 1: 'Out in the cold world, out in the street, / Asking a penny of each one I meet, / Shoeless I wander about through the day, / Wearing my young life in sorrow away; / No one to help me, no one to bless, / No one to pity me, none to caress; / Fatherless, motherless, sadly I roam, / A child of misfortune, I'm driven from home.'

Drivin' in tae Glesca in a Sour Milk Cart
This ballad begins: 'My name is Jemie Broon, an' I'm servin' at Polnoon. / A farmhouse near Eaglesham, that fine, old-fashioned toon - / Whaur wi' the milk ilk mornin', a wee while after three, / We tak, the road richt merrily, the auld black horse and me.' The broadside was published by the Poet's Box. 224 Overgate, Dundee.

Drucken Jock
Verse 1: 'They ca' me drucken Jock; / That may a' be true - / I neither beg nor steal, / Although I'm sometimes fou. / I'm neither lame nor crazy, / And I pay for what I drink; / There's no sae muckle odds o' fock / As ane would think.' 'Drucken' means 'drunken' and 'fou' means 'intoxicated'. The name of the publisher is not included and the sheet is not dated.

Drunkard's Raggit Wean
This ballad begins: 'A wee bit raggit laddie gangs wan'ren thro' the street, / Wadin' 'mang the snaw wi' his wee hackit feet, / He's shiv'rin i' the cauld blast, greetin' wi' the pain.' The text preceeding it reads: 'New Songs out every week. Copies of this Popular Song can always be had at the Poet's Box, 224 Overgate, Dundee.'

Drunkard's Raggit Wean
Verse 1 begins: 'A wee bit raggit laddie gangs wan'rin through the street / Wadin' through the snaw wi' his wee hackit feet'. This sheet was published by James Lindsay of 9 King Street, Glasgow.

Drunkard's Raggit Wean
This ballad begins: 'A wee bit raggit laddie gangs an'ren thro' the street, / Wadin' 'mang the snaw wi' his wee hackit feet, / He's shiv'rin' I' the cauld blast, greetin' wi' the pain; / Wha's the puir wee callan? he's a drunkard's raggit wean.' The broadside was published by the Poet's Box in Dundee. It does not carry a date of publication.

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