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Your search for ballad returned 911 broadsides

Displaying broadsides 211 to 240 of 911:

Country Hirings
Verse 1: 'Come all ye blooming country lads & listen unto me / And if I do but tell the truth, I know you will agree / It's of the jolly farmers, who servants want to have, / For to maintain them in their pride and be to them a slave.' There are no publication details given on this broadside.

Country I'm Leaving Behind
Verse 1: 'My barque leaves the harbour to-morrow, / Across the wide ocean to go, / Bnt, Kitty, my burden of sorrow, / Is more than I'd wish you to know. / there's a dreary dark cloud hanging o'er / And a mighty big cloud on my mind, / And I think of the prospects before me, / And the country I'm leaving behind.' It was published by the Poet's Box of Dundee.

Country I'm Leaving Behind
Verse 1: 'My barque leaves the harbour tomorrow, / Across the wide ocean to go, / But, Kitty, my burden of sorrow / Is more than I'd wish you to know. / There's a dreary dark cloud hanging o'er me, / And a mighty big cloud on my mind, / And I think of the prospects before me, / And the country I'm leaving behind.' This ballad was published by the Poet's Box, 190 Overgate, Dundee.

Cow and the Parson! and The Star of Glengary
'The Cow and the Parson!' begins: ''Twas near ____ town as stories go, - / (I can't say whether true or no;) / There lived a swain of low degree, / Yet with contentment bless'd and free'. 'The Star of Glengary' begins: 'The red moon is up on the moss-covered mountain, / The hour is at hand when I promised to rove'. The sheet carries no publication details.

Cradles Empty Babys Gone
This ballad begins: 'Little empty cradle treasured now with care, / Though thy precious burden it has fled, / How me miss the locks of curly golden hair; / Peeping from thy tiny snow-white bed' Below the title we are told that 'This popular song can always be had at the Poet's B 182 Overgate, Dundee'.

Crocodile
Verse 1 begins: 'Come list, ye landsmen unto me, / To tell you the truth I'm bound, / Of what happened me whilst I was at sea'. The text before this reads: 'This most wonderful song came out of the Poet's Box, and can only be had there for the price of One Penny. / AIR - End for End Jack'.

Crook & Plaid
Verse 1: 'If lassies lo'e their laddies, / They should, like me, confess't, / For every lassie has a laddie / she lo'es aboon the rest- / Who is dearer to her bosom / Whatever be his trade. / And through life I lo'e the laddie / That wears the crook and plaid.'

Cuddle Doon
This ballad begins: 'The bairnies cuddle doon at nicht, / Wi' muckle faucht an' din ; / O, try an' sleep ye waukrife rogues, / Your father's comin' in.' The text preceeding it reads: 'This Popular Recitation can always be had at the Poet's Box, 224 Overgate Dundee.'

Cuddle Doon
This ballad begins: 'The bairnies cuddle doon at nicht, / Wi' muckle faucht an' din; / O, try an' sleep ye waukrife rogues, / Your father's comin' in.' In English, 'muckle faucht' means 'a lot of fighting', and 'waukrife' means 'wakeful'. The sheet was published by the Poet's Box of Dundee.

Cuddy Peggy
This ballad begins: 'In the high town of Gala lived auld Peggy Tinlin, / Wha was blessed wi' content, though at times took to grumblin'; / Her calling in life was provisions to hawk, / And David, her cud, bore them a' on his back!' The broadside was published at 190 & 192 Overgate, Dundee, probably by the Poet's Box.

Cup Of Cold Water Or That's What I Read In The Next Week's Police News
This ballad begins: 'One night as I sat in a cup of cold water, / Nearly frozen to death by the heat of the sun, / I read in the papers a case of man slaughter / Which caused the salt tears from my poor nose to run.' Below the title we are told that, 'Copies of this popular song can always be had at the POET'S BOX, Overgaie, Dundee'. The text underneath the title also states that the song was written by James Curran, and sung by T. Barrick.

Dainty Geordie
Verse 1: 'Now here we're met to tak our glass, / And a' our party-jars suppress, / An' wi' ae mouth a' to confess, / That we like dainty Geordie.' This ballad was sung to the tune of 'Dainty Davie', written by Robert Burns.

Dancing Swell
This ballad begins: 'In the art of dancing / Greatly I excel, / It has a power entrancing / On this agile swell.' It was originally published in 1866 by the Poet's Box, of 80 London Street, Glasgow, although this address has been crudely obscured. It cost a penny to buy.

Dandy Servants
Verse 1 begins: 'Ye braw decenent women I?ll sing ye a song, / Of the wit of the auld and the pride of the young'. There are no further details attached to this publication.

Daring Slack Wire
This ballad begins: 'Good evening, my friends, I'll have you to know / I went to a circus a short time ago ; / When in my box, gazing all about, / Some fellow by my side like a bear shouted out--- / Look where she goes, / My own Sophia, / Swinging, by Jove, / On the daring slack wire.' It was published on April 4th 1874.

Dark Bonnymuir
Verse 1 begins: 'As evening dashed on the western shore, / Caledonia stood perched on the waves of the Clyde; / Her arms wide extended she raised with devotion, / "My poor bleeding country" she vehemently cried'.

Dark Girl Dressed in Blue
This ballad begins: 'When first in Glasgow I arrived, the truth I will unfold, / I had a pocketbook with me, well filled with notes and gold'. A woodcut of a black woman carrying a basket and wearing European dress illustrates the top of the sheet. She is in a tropical setting as there is a palm tree behind her.

Dark Girl Dressed in Blue
Verse 1 begins: 'When first in Glasgow I arrived, the truth I will unfold, / I had a pocketbook with me, well filled with notes and gold'. There is a woodcut of a black woman, holding a basket standing in front of a palm tree.

Dark-hair'd Girl and The Moon
'The Dark-hair'd Girl' begins: 'Oh, my dark-hair'd girl, your ringlets deck / In silken curls your graceful neck; / Your neck is like the swan, and pure as the pearl, / And diamonds are thy eyes, Oh, my dark-hair'd girl.'

Darlin' Old Stick and Loch Katrine Water
'Darlin' Old Stick' begins: 'My name is bold Morgan M'Carthy, from Trim, / My relations all dead, except one brother Jim'. 'Loch Katrine Water' begins: 'The brave highland chieftains went forth hand in hand, / For to welcome their Queen at the head of their clan'. The author of 'Loch Katrine Water' is given as 'JOHN WILSON, Ballad-Singer', and the poem is dedicated to 'Her Majesty'. The sheet carries no date or publication details.

Day wi' the Rabbits at West Preston, Kirkbean
Verse 1: 'A Blackbird, a Craw, a Swan, and a Lamb / Ae day wi' the Forrester met on the Sands ; / Says the yin to the ither, "the rabbits are thrang ; / "Could we no' get a day to gie them a bang?".' A chain-detail decorative border has been included on the sheet to increase its preceived value.

Dear Old pal
This ballad begins: 'I like to meet with dear old pals, / Wherever I may be, / I like a song, a pipe and glass, / And jovial company.' The text preceeding it reads: 'NEW YEAR'S SONG 1899 / Written expressly for the Poet's Box / [title] / Copies of this New and Popular Song can always be had at the Poet's Box, 10 Hunter Street, Dundee.'

Death and the Lady
Verse 1 'DEATH?Fair lady, lay your costly robes aside, / No longer may you glory in your pride; / Take leave of all your carnal vain delight, / I'm come to summons you away tonight.' The poem is prefaced by stern quotes from the bible that include 'She that liveth in pleasure is dead while she liveth' (Timothy, verse 6) and 'Tremble, ye women that are at ease' (Isaiah).

Death of Abercrombie and Workhouse Boy
The first ballad begins: 'RECITATIVE. / Twas on the spot, in ancient lore oft nam'd, / Where Isis and Osiris once held sway / O'er kings who sleep in pyramidic pride'.

Death of Dr Livingstone
This ballad begins: 'Since making songs is all the rage I thought I'd try my hand / And bring before you something new, but you must understand.' It should be sung to its original tune. This sheet was published by the Poet's Box, Glasgow and would have sold for a penny a sheet.

Death of Gen. Gordon
Verse 1: 'Across the vast Soudan was borne, / While England bowed her head, / The words which thrilled each British heart, / "Our mighty hero s dead." / With bated breath we heard that praise, / Which buries hope - "too late!" / For honour! General Gordon lived - / For honour met his fate.' Given the subject matter of this ballad, it is likely that the sheet was published around 1885.

Defence of Scotland
Verse 1 begins: 'AULD ROBIN he came frae the town, / An' a frighten'd man was he'. The text preceding this reads: 'FROM THE CALEDONIAN MERCURY, AUGUST 4, 1803. / TUNE - "I hae been Courting at a Lass".'

Deil's Boolin' Match on Montrose Green
Verse 1 begins: 'The nicht was dismal, dark, and drear, / Nae lichtsome star did e'er appear / To gie the worthy burghers cheer / In Auld Montrose'. The poem is initialled 'R.D.M.' and decorative woodcut borders have been included on the sheet.

Destruction of Abercrombie!
This ballad begins: 'ABERCROMBIE came down like a wolf on the fold, / And his pockets were furnish'd with Devonshire gold; / And his pale senseless face was as fearful to see, / As the dark troubl'd wave on the deep Galilee.'

Destruction of Abercrombie!
Verse 1 begins: 'ABERCROMBIE came down like a wolf on the fold, / And his pockets were furnish'd with Devonshire gold'. There is a hand-written note dating this sheet to the 9th July 1832. There is also a woodcut of a well-dressed but merry gentleman straddling a barrel of beer in a cellar.

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