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Your search for courtship returned 233 broadsides

Displaying broadsides 181 to 210 of 233:

Nora, the Maid of Killarney
This poem begins, 'Down by the beautiful Lakes of Killarney, / Off times I have met my own dear Barney'. The sheet has been signed by the poet. The National Library of Scotland has two other signed McGonagall poems, 'The Burial of Mr Gladstone' and 'The Blind Girl'. A note at the top states the poem was composed in September 1899.

Norah Magee
Verse 1: 'Norah, dear Norah, I cant live without you, / What made you leave me to cross the wide sea / Norah, dear Norah, oh! why did you doubt me / The world seems so dark and so drearly to me? / Why from old Ireland have you been a ranger / Why have you chosen the wide world to roam / Why did you go to the land of the stranger, / And leave your own Barney alone, all alone?' This song was published by the Poet's Box, 190 & 192 Overgate, Dundee.

Norah O'Neil
Verse 1: 'Oh! I'm lonely to-night, love, without you, / And sigh for one glance of your eye, / For sure there's a charm, love, about you, / Whenever I know you are nigh. / Like the beam of the star when 'tis smiling, / Is the glance which your eye can't conceal; / And your voice is so sweet and beguiling, / That I love you, sweet Norah O'Neil.' This ballad was to be sung to an 'Original' tune and was priced at one penny. It was published on Saturday, 20th February 1869 by the Poet's Box, probably in Glasgow.

Nothing at all
Verse 1: 'In Derry-down Dale when I wanted a mate, / I went with my daddy a-courting to Kate; / With my nosegay so fine, and my holiday clothes, / My hands in my pockets, a courting I goes; / the weather was cold and my bosom was hot, / My heart in a gallop, my mare in a trot; / Now I was so bashful, and loving withal, / My tongue stuck to my mouth, I said nothing at all, / But fol, de rol.' This ballad was published on Saturday, 24th November 1855 by the Poet's Box in Glasgow, priced one penny.

Nothing More
Verse 1: 'In a fair valley I wandere'd, / O'er its meadow pathways green; / Where a singing brook was flowing, / Like the spirit of the scene; / And I saw a lovely maiden, / With a basket brimming o'er; / With sweet buds, and so I ask'd her / For a flower, and - nothing more.' It was printed by Robert M'Intosh, probably in Glasgow.

Now Jenny Lass My Bonny Bird
This ballad begins: 'Now Jenny lass, my bonny bird / My daddy's dead an' a' that, / He's snugly laid a-neath the yaird, / An' I'm his heir an' a' that.' The name of the publisher is not included and the sheet is not dated.

Now, We Will Get Married. We've Got Nothing Else To Do
The first verse reads: 'I am a yeung man in search of a wife, / All for to be the pleasures and comforts of my life, / If anyone should hear me, and I declare its true, / Saying, now we will get married, we've got nothing else to do.' A woodcut illustration showing a young couple sitting underneath a tree, surrounded by several figures, has been included. There are no publication details given, but this is one of two songs - printed by James Lindsay - on this sheet.

On board the "Kangaroo"
Verse 1: 'Once I was a waterman, / And lived at home at ease; / Now I am a mariner, / And plough the angry seas; / I thought I'd like a seafarin' life, / So bid my love "adoo," / And shipped as cook and stewart, boys, / On board o' the "Kangaroo."

On the banks of Allan Water
This ballad begins: 'On the banks of Allan Water / When the sweet spring-time did fall / Was the miller's lovely daughter, / Fairest of them all.' The text preceeding it reads: 'This Popular Song can always be had at the Poet's Boz, 224 Overgate Dundee.'

On the Banks of Allan Water
Verse 1: 'On the banks of Allan Water / When the sweet spring-time did fall / Was the miller's lovely daughter, / Fairest of them all, / For his Brlde a soldier sought her, / And a winning tongue had he! / On the banks of Allan Water, / None so gay as she.' The broadside was published by the Poet's Box in Dundee. It does not carry a date of publication.

Original Songs by John Pettigrew
'Auld Bailie Snap' begins: 'There is auld Bailie Snap he does reign in the east'
'Ancient Striling' begins: 'Let minstrels sing of sparkling wine'
'My Bonnie Dark-Eyed Dearie' begins: 'Oh, the sun has set an gloamin' grey'
'Leaving Thee for Ever' begins: 'I leave thee not in passion's hour'. The broadside was published for the author at the Minerva Printing Works, 80 London Street, Glasgow. It is not dated.

Paisley Officer
Verse 1: 'In blythe and bonny Scotland, where the blue bells do grow, / There dwelt a pretty fair maid down in a valley low'. A woodcut has been included at the top of the sheet. It shows a vanquished man in a wooded glade, surrounded by threatening advisories.

Paisley Officer
This ballad begins: 'In blythe and bonny Scotland where the blue bells do grow, / There dwelt a pretty maid down in a valley low. / Its all the day long she herded sheep upon the banks of Clyde, / Although her lot in life was low she was called the village pride.' The broadside carries no publication details.

Paisley Officer
This ballad begins: 'In blythe and bonny Scotland, where the blue bells do grow, / There dwelt a pretty fair maid down in a valley low.' The woodcut included above the title shows a wooded valley. At the bottom of the valley a uniformed man is being brutally attacked by both women and men, one of whom is on a horse.

Parody on Laird o' Cockpen
This ballad begins: 'The Laird o' Cockpen he's puir and he's duddy / Wi' daidling and drinking his head is aye muddy / But he was determined to hae a bit wife, / Although shs [she] should vex him the rest o' his life'.

Poor Forsaken Village Maid
Verse 1: 'A VILLAGE maid she sat weeping / She thought of happy days gone by, / And as her darling babe lay sleeping / A tear fell gently from her eye. / She tho ught of home and her deceiver / Poor girl by him she was betrayed, / She's left alone now broken hearted, The poor forsaken village maid.'

Pretty Little Nell
This broadside begins: 'LADY'S VERSION OF / PRETTY LITTLE NELL / THE FARMER'S DAUGHTER. / Written and Composed expressly for / Miss NELL MOONEY, / By Mr James A. Kerr, Edinburgh. / Air. PRETTY NELL.' The ballad begins: 'Now I am not a fast young lady, / Nor do I lead a fashionable life'.

Pretty Little Nell the Farmers Daughter and Down Among the Coal
The first verse of 'Pretty Little Nell' begins: 'When strolling on one summer's day down / a country lane, / just for a change of air, my boys, from town that / day I came'. The chorus begins: 'Pretty Little Nell, the farmer's daughter / I met her at the well drawing water'. Included at the top of the sheet is a woodcut illustration of a young woman with a dog.

Pretty Rosaline
This ballad begins: 'Twas near the banks of bonny Tweed, / And in a flowery dell, / A rustic cottage reared its head, / The traveller knew it well; / For there a little lassie dwelt, / As fair as beauty's queen - / Not one so rare, not one so fair / As pretty Rosaline.' It was to be sung to an 'Original' tune, and was published on Saturday, 23rd December 1871 by the Poet's Box in Glasgow, priced one penny.

Ranty, Tanty
This ballad begins: 'Nansey's to the Green. Wood gane, / To hear the Lintwhite chattering / And Willie's follow'd her alane; / To gain her Love by flattering. / But all that he could do or say, / She snuft and sneered at him, / And ay when he began to Woe, She had him mind wha gat him.'

Return o' the Gallowgate Lad
Verse 1: 'I'm as happy as a queen, and the day gangs alang / Like an hour in the month o' May, / Said young Maggie Benson, wi'a face fu o' smiles, / For my lad's come back the day. / Aye, and mony's the lang weary nicht I've passed / Since my love bade me gudebye; / I never thocht I'd leeve to see this happy day, / For I've done nocht but cry. ' This ballad was to be sung to the tune of 'My Love Nell', and was published by the Poet's Box, Dundee.

Robin Tamson's Smiddy
Verse 1: 'My mither men't my auld breeks, / An' wow! But they were duddy, / An sent me to get shod our mare / At Robin Tamson's smiddy. / The smiddy stands beside a burn / That wimples through the clachan; / I never yet gae by the door, / But aye I fa' a lauchin.' The printer and supplier of this broadside are not identified, but at the foot of the page there is an advertisment for songbooks 'sent post free to any address for 7 stamps'.

Robin's So Shy
Verse 1: 'Young Robin, my sweetheart, is handsome and fair, / His cheeks are fresh coloured and raven his hair, / My Robin is nimble and light on his feet, / To me he's the dearest I ever did meet, / But Robin's so shy: / 'Tis very distressing that Robin's so shy.' This ballad was to be sung to an 'Original' tune and was priced at one penny. It was published on Saturday, 9th March 1867, by the Poet's Box, probably in Glasgow.

Roslin Castle
Verse 1: ''Twas in the season of the year, / When all things gay and light appear, / That Colin with his morning ray, / Arose and sung the rural lay, / Of Nanny's charms the Shepherd sung, / The hills and dales with Nanny rung / While Roslin Castle heard the swain, / And echo'd back the cheerful strain.' The broadside carries no publication details.

Sailor and farmer's daughter
This ballad begins: ?A sailor courted a farmer?s daughter / that lived convenient to the Isle of man / But mark good people what followed after / a long time courting against their will?. There is no date or place of publication.

Sailor Boy
This ballad begins: 'One dark and stormy night / The snow lay on the ground / A sailor boy stood on the quay / His ship was out ward bound . . . ' Below the title, we are told that this ballad 'Can be had at the Poet's Box, Dundee', and that it costs one penny.

Sally Munro
Verse 1: 'Come all you young females I pray you attend, / Unto these few lines that I have here pen'd; / I'll tell you the hardships I did undergo, / With my bonny lass named Sally Munro, / James Dixon's my name, I'm a blacksmith by trade / In the town of Ayr I was born and bred, / From that unto Belfast I lately did go, / There I got acquainted with Sally Munro.' The broadside carries no publication details.

Sally Munro
Verse 1: 'Come all you young females I pray you attend, / Unto these few lines that I have here pen'd; / I'll tell you the hardships I did undergo, / With my bonny lass called Sally Munro, / James Dixon's my name, I'm a blacksmith by [t]rade / In the town of Ayr I was born and bred, / From that unto Belfast I lately did go, / There I got acquainted with Sally Munro.' The sheet carries no publication details.

Science of Kissing
This broadside feature begins: 'People will kiss, yet not one in a hundred years knows how to extract bliss from lovely lips, any more than he knows how to make diamonds from charcoal. And yet it is easy, at least for us. First know whom you are going to kiss.' Although no publication date is included, a note at the foot of the sheet states that it was published, or supplied, by 'L. Macartney, The Poet's Box, 184 Overgate, Dundee'.

Slaney Side
Verse 1: 'I am a noble hero, / By birth I am enslaved, / Near to the town of Wexford, / There dwells a comely maid, / She is fairer than Diana, / She is free from earthly pride, / And, this lovely maid, her dwelling place, / Is near the Slaney side.' This broadside was published by James Lindsay of 9 King Street, Glasgow.

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