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Broadside ballad entitled 'Donald's Return to Glencoe'

Transcription

DONALD'S RETURN

TO    GLENCOE.

As I wag a walking one evening- of late,
When Flora's gay mantle the fields decorate,
I carelessly wandered where 1 did not know,
On the banks of a fouutain that lies in Glencoe.

Like her whom the prize on Mount Ida had won,
There approached me a lassie as bright as the sun;
The ribbands and tartans around her did flow,
That once graced M'Donald, the pride of Glencoe.

With courage undaunted I to her drew nigh,
The red ruse and lilly on her cheek seemed to vie;
I asked her name, and how far she did go ?
She answered me, "Kind sir, I'm bound to Glencoe."

" Young man,'' she made answer, "your suite I disdain
I once had a sweetheart, young Donald his name,
He went to the wars about ten years ago,
And a maid I'll remain till he returns to Glencoe.''

" Perhaps your young Donald regards not your name,
Bui has plae'd his affection on seme foreign dame,
And may have forgotton, for ought that you know,
The lovely young lassie he left in Glencoe.

" My Donald's true valour, when tried in the field,
Like his gallant ancestors disdaining to yield,
The Spaniards and French he will soon overthrow,
And in splendour return to my arms in Glencoe."

" The power of the French, love, is hard to pull down,
They have caused many heroes to die in their wounds ;
And with yonr own Donald it may happen so,
'The man you love so dearly perhaps is laid low."

" My Donald can ne'er from his promise depart,
For love, truth, and honour, are found in his heart;
And if ! ne'er see him ! single will go,
And mourn for my Donald, the pride of Glencoe.

Now finding her constant, I pull'd out the glove,
Which, at parting, she gave me as a token oi love,
She hung on his breast, while tears did flow,
Saying, Are You my Donald, return'd to Glencoe ':''

Cheer up my dear Flora. your sorrows are o'er,
While life does remain, we will never part more;
The rude storms of war at a distance may blow,
While in pace and contentment I reside in. Glencoe."

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Probable period of publication: 1830-1850   shelfmark: L.C.Fol.178.A.2(206)
Broadside ballad entitled 'Donald's Return to Glencoe'
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