The Word on the Street
home | background | illustrations | distribution | highlights | search & browse | resources | contact us

Broadside concerning the trial and sentence of William Thomson, James Thomson, and John Fram

Transcription

A Full and Particular Account of the
Trial and Senetnce of WILLIAM
THOMSON, JAMES THMSON,
and JOHN, FRAM, who are to be

Executed at Dalkeith, on Thursday 1st
March, 1827, for Highway Robbery.

YESTERDAY, Monday, 22d January, 1827,

came on before the High Court of Justicary,
the trial of William Thomson, James Thomson,
and John Fram, labourers, accused of attacking and
assaulting, on the 30th November last, at or near
the foot of Langside Brae, in the parish of Dalkeith,
George Dickson, farmer, Cousland, who was return-
ing home from Dalkelth market, when they seized
hold of his horse ,and struck the said G. Dickson
several sever blows on the face, head, and breast,
with large wooden bludgeons, or other offencive
weapons, by which he was severly wounded, to the
great efusion of his blood ; and that they afterwards
robbed him of a silver hunting watch....a copy of
the Scotsman, and a letter addressed to Mrs Dick-
son, besides several memorandums.

George Dickson was in Dalkeith on the 30th day
of November,....he left it at 5 o'clock in the after-
noon, on horseback, quite sober. He took the di-
rect road by the Cow Bridge, and Langside Brae,
to Cousland. Thers is a plantation on the west
side of the brae, and on the east side there is a
smaller one, of about two acres. There is a small
burn at the bottom of the brae, near which there
were several piles of stones laid up for breaking.
He was at Langside Brae about 10 minutes past 5,
it was twilight; when at the foot of the brae, a
man started out from these stones, and took hold of
the reins of his horse. He had a large stick in his
hand, with which he made a stroke at witness. It
appeared to be a stick, neatly cut, having a large,
knot at one end. Witness gave his horse a touch
with his foot, upon which the animal reared, but
the moment he came down, another man seized
him on the other side. The horse reared several
times, witness always endeavouring to bring him.
above his assailants, but every time he came to his
feet he was seized by one of the fellows. Witness
received a severe blow on the side of the head ; and
when the horse came to his feet the last time, one
of the men pulled out witness's watch, (which he
described) and some papers, which were in his side,
pocket ; also a newspaper, which was in his coat
pocket. Witness here identified a letter and some
papers : and stated, that he received in all, four se-
vere blows upon the head. He lost a great quan-
tity of blood. He said that there were four men
in the party, and one cried twice, ' Murder the-------,
murder him.'    Witness looked at the prisoners :
He said he knew them all by sight; they were all
of the party who robbed him.    Three of the four
men had on dark coloured clothes, and one had on a
red vest with stone coloured sleeves,...it was Fram
who was thus dressed.    It was William Thomson
who came forward and gave him the first blow : it
was Fram who cried out ' Murder him.' A man, or
rather a boy (William Leslie) was brought into
Court, and identified as the fourth of the party. The
whole, or most of the party, had sticks newly cut_

The Lord Justice Clerk, in an address which oc-
cupied an hour and a half, laid before the jury the
whole case, as brought out in evidence.    After
which, the jury, without leaving the box, unaui-
mously found all the prisonrs guilty, but recomend-
ed James Thomson and John Fram to the mercy
of the crown.    They were then sentenced to be
executed on Thursday the 1st of March, at or near
Dalkeith, or such other place as the Sheriff should
fix upon.                        

previous pageprevious          
Date of publication: 1827   shelfmark: F.3.a.14(36)
Broadside concerning the trial and sentence of William Thomson, James Thomson, and John Fram
View larger image

NLS home page   |   Digital gallery   |   Credits

National Library of Scotland © 2004

National Library of Scotland